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Current Critical care News and Events

Current Critical care News and Events, Critical care News Articles.
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CF patients experience improved lung health with lumacaftor-ivacaftor but with caveats
In adolescent and adult patients with cystic fibrosis taking lumacaftor-ivacaftor (ORKAMBI®), the combination drug appears to improve lung function and body weight and reduce the need for intravenous antibiotic treatment, according to a French study published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2019-10-11)
New evidence on the mistreatment of women during childbirth
New evidence from a World Health Organization (WHO)-led study in four countries shows more than one-third of women experience mistreatment during childbirth in health facilities. (2019-10-08)
Some ICU admissions may be preventable, saving money and improving care
Many admissions to the intensive care unit may be preventable, potentially decreasing health care costs and improving care, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (2019-10-04)
Women with asthma appear more likely to have lower levels of testosterone
Women with asthma appear more likely to have lower levels of 'free' (not attached to proteins) testosterone than women who do not have asthma, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2019-09-30)
As we age, oral health plays increasing role in overall health
The need is evident, say the authors. Data from the National Center for Health Statistics indicates that the prevalence of cavities is more than twice as high in older adults than younger adults. (2019-09-26)
Prediction system significantly increases palliative care consults
A trigger system powered by predictive analytics increased palliative care consultations by 75 percent after its implementation (2019-09-25)
Predicting epileptic seizures might be more difficult than previously thought
By studying the brain dynamics of 28 subjects with epilepsy, scientists demonstrated there is no evidence for a previously suspected warning sign for seizures known as 'critical slowing down,' which refers to characteristic changes in the behavior of a complex system that approaches a theoretical tipping point; when this point is exceeded, there can be impactful and devastating changes. (2019-09-24)
ACC issues principles for overcoming compensation, opportunity inequity
The American College of Cardiology today published its first health policy statement on cardiologist compensation and opportunity equity, recognizing that both are critical to the health and future of the cardiovascular workforce and achieving ACC's mission to transform cardiovascular care and improve heart health. (2019-09-16)
Groundbreaking study targets one of Canada's most deadly medical conditions
Scientists have shown for the first time evidence that early sampling of blood for microorganisms in sepsis is critical to treating the common and potentially fatal condition. (2019-09-16)
More severe OSA leads to higher blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension
In patients with high blood pressure resistant to treatment who also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the more severe their OSA, the higher their blood pressure, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (2019-09-13)
Researchers identify focus points to reduce opioid overdose deaths
A new study identifies specific locations where medication and harm reduction services for people with opioid use disorder should be available in order to have the greatest impact on reducing opioid overdose deaths. (2019-09-13)
How sepsis care program saves lives and reduces costs
A sepsis care quality improvement program saves lives, shortens hospital stays and reduces healthcare costs, according to a study by researchers at Loyola Medicine and Loyola University Chicago. (2019-09-04)
Heart attack care in Sweden superior to UK
People suffering from heart attacks in Sweden were less likely to die from them in the short and long-term than those in England and Wales, according to a new study. (2019-09-02)
Rutgers-developed model for ICU pharmacists addresses common dilemma for hospitals
A new team-based model for intensive care unit (ICU) pharmacists, developed by Rutgers and RWJBarnabas Health System, resolves a common dilemma for hospitals and improves care for critically ill patients. (2019-08-05)
Flu vaccine reduces risk of dying for elderly intensive care patients
An influenza vaccine does not just work when it comes to influenza. (2019-08-02)
ATS publishes clinical guideline on obesity hypoventilation syndrome
The American Thoracic Society has published an official clinical guideline on the evaluation and management of obesity hypoventilation syndrome in the Society's Aug. (2019-08-01)
Emergency medicine: Department-based intensive care unit improves patient survival rates
A new Michigan Medicine study found that implementing a dedicated emergency medicine department-based intensive care unit improved patient survival rates and lowered inpatient intensive care unit (ICU) admissions. (2019-07-25)
Patients want physicians more involved in their health outside of the doctor's office
A media briefing on a nationwide survey of physicians and consumers conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs on:How consumers and physicians define self-care. (2019-07-22)
Ivacaftor may reduce common infections in patients with CF
Patients with cystic fibrosis who take ivacaftor appear to have fewer respiratory infections over time than those not taking the drug, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (2019-07-19)
AGS commends bipartisan leaders on bringing training legislation closer to law
As members of the House Committee on Energy & Commerce move to debate, amend, and revise a host of important health proposals, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) again pledged enthusiastic support for one of the Committee's most important bills under consideration: The Educating Medical Professionals and Optimizing Workforce Efficiency and Readiness (EMPOWER) for Health Act of 2019 (H.R. (2019-07-11)
A structured approach to detecting and treating depression in primary care
A questionnaire-based management algorithm for major depressive disorder in primary care is feasible to implement, though attrition from treatment is high. (2019-07-10)
Nonphysician practitioners absorbing more new patient requests post Affordable Care Act
The advent of the Affordable Care Act has led to millions of new patients seeking primary care. (2019-07-10)
How primary care physicians can make Astana work
The Astana Declaration, adopted by the World Health Organization in October 2018, acknowledges the importance of primary health care to achieve better health outcomes globally. (2019-07-10)
Catheters: Big source of infection, but often overlooked
Indwelling devices like catheters cause roughly 25% of hospital infections, but ongoing efforts to reduce catheter use and misuse haven't succeeded as much as health care workers would like. (2019-07-01)
New initiative improved care for sepsis patients, but black patients saw smaller benefits
The New York Sepsis Initiative was launched in 2014 with the goal of improving the prompt identification and treatment of sepsis. (2019-07-01)
Shorter rotations in intensive care units mitigate burnout among physicians
Shortening the length of rotations in a medical intensive care unit (MICU) from the traditional 14-consecutive day schedule to only seven days helps mitigate burnout among critical care physicians, according to a new Penn Medicine pilot study. (2019-06-25)
What influences critical care doctors in withdrawing life support for patients with brain injury?
Decisions to withdraw life support treatments in critically ill patients with severe brain injury are complicated, are based on many factors, and are usually made by critical care physicians and families in the intensive care unit. (2019-06-17)
Bacterial chemical 'signatures' a sign of damaged gut microbiome in critical illness
Chemicals produced by healthy bacteria could be used to assess the health of the gut microbiome and help identify critically-ill children at greatest risk of organ failure, a study published in Critical Care Medicine has found. (2019-06-13)
Organ and tissue donation in patients considering MAiD: new guidance helps navigate emerging area
A new publication in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) aims to help health care teams navigate clinical and ethical issues that arise when patients choose to donate organs or tissue after medical assistance in dying (MAiD) or withdrawal of life-sustaining measures. (2019-06-03)
Countries' essential medicines lists vary greatly from one another & WHO's model list
Countries' essential medicines lists vary from one another and from the World Health Organization's (WHO) model list, pointing to a potential need for greater care in selecting medicines that best meet the health care priorities of a population, suggests a study led by Toronto's St. (2019-06-03)
Hospital-acquired infections may be lower in closed ICUs
Three hospital-acquired infections rates appear to be lower in patients admitted to a 'closed' intensive care unit, meaning that the ICU team has primary responsibility for the patient, rather than a primary care physician, (2019-05-22)
SCAI releases multi-society endorsed consensus on the classification stages of cardiogenic shock
A newly released expert consensus statement proposes a classification schema for cardiogenic shock that will facilitate communication in both the clinical and research settings. (2019-05-20)
Do family members belong in ICU during procedures? Study finds clinicians mixed on practice
Do family members of loved ones who are critically ill and being treated in an intensive care unit at a hospital belong there when clinicians are performing bedside procedures? (2019-05-20)
New risk scores help physicians provide better care for high-risk pulmonary patients, study finds
Study of more than 17,000 patients finds new laboratory-based method of estimating outcomes for patients with a severe pulmonary disorder that has no cure can help physicians better provide proper care, referrals, and services for patients at the end of life. (2019-05-19)
Bacterial pneumonia predicts ongoing lung problems in infants with acute respiratory FAI
Bacterial pneumonia appears to be linked to ongoing breathing problems in previously healthy infants who were hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure. (2019-05-19)
New tool measures primary care as a whole
There are a number of measures to assess aspects of primary care, but a new measure breaks new ground by combining experiences of patients, clinicians, and payers and allowing the most informed reporter -- the patient -- to assess vital primary care functions that are often missed. (2019-05-14)
In rural areas, buprenorphine is provided by primary care clinicians
As the United States undertakes intense efforts to increase the number of prescribers of buprenorphine for opioid use disorder, it is critical to understand who currently provides such treatment and how. (2019-05-14)
Azithromycin appears to reduce treatment failure in severe, acute COPD exacerbations
The antibiotic azithromycin may reduce treatment failure in patients hospitalized for an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2019-05-03)
Finnish school students outperform US students on 'fake news' digital literacy tasks
A recent study revealed students at an international school in Finland significantly outperformed US students on tasks which measure digital literacy in social media and online news. (2019-05-02)
Study finds low hand hygiene compliance on ICUs
Healthcare workers on intensive care units (ICUs) are regularly missing opportunities to clean their hands during the care of patients, despite its critical importance for infection control, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16). (2019-04-14)
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