Current Crystal News and Events

Current Crystal News and Events, Crystal News Articles.
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Natural three-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal
Nonlinear photonic crystals are playing a prominent role in laser and nonlinear optics. Here, Scientists in China presented a natural potassium-tantalate-niobate (KTN) nonlinear photonic crystal with 3D Rubik's domain structures. The composite rotated domains could be useful for different phase-matching conditions with rich reciprocal vectors along arbitrary direction. KTN crystal breaks strict requirements for incident light and crystal direction in nonlinear optics and trigger newfangled optoelectronic applications for perovskite ferroelectrics. (2020-12-02)

Hitting the quantum 'sweet spot': Researchers find best position for atom qubits in silicon
Australian researchers have located the 'sweet spot' for positioning qubits in silicon to scale up atom-based quantum processors. (2020-11-30)

Using a soft crystal to visualize how absorbed carbon dioxide behaves in liquid
A team of scientists has succeeded in visualizing how carbon dioxide (CO2) behaves in an ionic liquid that selectively absorbs CO2. The finding is expected to help develop more efficient methods to capture CO2 in the atmosphere, one of the major factors causing global warming. (2020-11-25)

Scientists determine the structure of glass-shaping protein in sponges
Researchers from TU Dresden and the Swiss Light Source at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland are the first to determine the three dimensional (3D) structure of a protein responsible for glass formation in sponges. They explain how the earliest and, in fact, the only known natural protein-mineral crystal is formed. The results were published in the journal PNAS. (2020-11-25)

Efficient and durable perovskite solar cell materials
POSTECH professor Kilwon Cho's research team fabricates highly efficient and stable perovskite solar cells through molecular designing of organic spacers. (2020-11-24)

Using strain to control oxynitride properties
Japanese scientists have stumbled onto a simple method for controlling the introduction of defects, called 'vacancy layers', into perovskite oxynitrides, leading to changes in their physical properties. The approach, published in the journal Nature Communications, could help in the development of photocatalysts. (2020-11-23)

A new beat in quantum matter
Oscillatory behaviors are ubiquitous in Nature, ranging from the orbits of planets to the periodic motion of a swing. In pure crystalline systems, presenting a perfect spatially-periodic structure, the fundamental laws of quantum physics predict a remarkable and counter-intuitive oscillatory behavior: when subjected to a weak electric force, the electrons in the material do not undergo a net drift, but rather oscillate in space, a phenomenon known as Bloch oscillations. (2020-11-23)

Staying ahead of the curve with 3D curved graphene
A team of researchers has amplified 3D graphene's electrical properties by controlling its curvature. (2020-11-20)

New insights into memristive devices by combining incipient ferroelectrics and graphene
Scientists are working to create neuromorphic computers, with a design based on the human brain. A crucial component is a memristive device, the resistance of which depends on the history of the device - just like the response of our neurons depends on previous input. Materials scientists from the University of Groningen analysed the behaviour of strontium titanium oxide, a platform material for memristor research and used the 2D material graphene to probe it. (2020-11-20)

Scientists age quantum dots in a test tube
Researchers from MIPT and the RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics have proposed a simple and convenient way to obtain arbitrarily sized quantum dots required for physical experiments via chemical aging. (2020-11-19)

Scientists discover a new mineral
The research team headed by Stanislav Filatov, Professor at the Department of Crystallography at St Petersburg University, has discovered a new mineral species in Kamchatka - petrovite. The scientists named the find in honour of Tomas Petrov, an outstanding crystallographer and Professor at St Petersburg University. He together with his students Arkady Glikin and Sergei Moshkin, was the first in the world to create a technology for growing jewellery malachite. (2020-11-16)

Success in controlling perovskite ions' composition paves the way for device applications
Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites have received much attention as potential next generation solar cells and as materials for light-emitting devices. Kobe University's Associate Professor TACHIKAWA Takashi (of the Molecular Photoscience Research Center) and Dr. KARIMATA Izuru (previously a graduate student engaged in research at the Graduate School of Science) have succeeded in completely substituting the halide ions of perovskite nanocrystals while maintaining their morphology and light-emitting efficiency. (2020-11-13)

Order from chaos
Engineers from Kyoto Universityg have developed a new beam scanning device utilizing photonic crystals, eliminating the use of mechanical mirrors. The team found that modulating the shape and position of the lattice allows the laser beam to be emitted in a unique direction, opening the door for compact multi-directional beam scanner technology. (2020-11-13)

Time for a new state of matter in high-temperature superconductors
Scientists from Universität Hamburg have pointed out how to create a time crystal in an intriguing class of materials, the high-temperature superconductors. They propose to drive these superconducting materials into a time crystalline state by inducing Higgs excitations via light. The work is reported in the journal Physical Review Research. (2020-11-12)

Environmentally friendly method could lower costs to recycle lithium-ion batteries
A new process for restoring spent cathodes to mint condition could make it more economical to recycle lithium-ion batteries. The process, developed by nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego, is more environmentally friendly than today's methods; it uses greener ingredients, consumes 80 to 90% less energy, and emits about 75% less greenhouse gases. (2020-11-12)

Researchers make key advance for printing circuitry on wearable fabrics
Electronic shirts that keep the wearer comfortably warm or cool, as well as medical fabrics that deliver drugs, monitor the condition of a wound and perform other tasks, may one day be manufactured more efficiently thanks to a key research advance. (2020-11-12)

Turning heat into power with efficient organic thermoelectric material
Thermoelectric materials can turn a temperature difference into electricity. Organic thermoelectric materials could be used to power wearable electronics or sensors; however, the power output is still very low. An international team led by Jan Anton Koster, Professor of Semiconductor Physics at the University of Groningen, has now produced an n-type organic semiconductor with superior properties that brings these applications a big step closer. Their results were published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-11-11)

Researchers trap electrons to create elusive crystal
Now, a Cornell-led collaboration has developed a way to stack two-dimensional semiconductors and trap electrons in a repeating pattern that forms a specific and long-hypothesized crystal. (2020-11-11)

Getting single-crystal diamond ready for electronics
Researchers from Osaka University and collaborating partners polished single-crystal diamond to near-atomic smoothness without damaging it. This will improve the performance and sustainability of future electronics. (2020-11-10)

Crystals reveal the danger of sleeping volcanoes
Most active volcanoes on Earth are dormant and are normally not considered hazardous. A team of volcanologists from the University of Geneva has devised a technique that can predict their devastating potential. The scientists used zircon, a tiny crystal contained in volcanic rocks, to estimate the volume of magma that could be erupted once Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico) will wake up from its dormancy. Up to 350 km3 of magma are currently lying below. (2020-11-05)

New mineral discovered in moon meteorite
The high-pressure mineral Donwilhelmsite, recently discovered in the lunar meteorite Oued Awlitis 001 from Apollo missions, is important for understanding the inner structure of the earth. (2020-11-03)

A new method to measure optical absorption in semiconductor crystals
Tohoku University researchers have revealed more details about omnidirectional photoluminescence (ODPL) spectroscopy - a method for probing semiconducting crystals with light to detect defects and impurities. (2020-10-29)

Crystal structure of SARS-CoV-2 papain-like protease
The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is changing the world like never before. This crisis is unlikely contained in the absence of effective therapeutics or vaccine. The papain-like protease (PLpro) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) plays essential roles in virus replication and immune evasion, presenting a promising drug target. (2020-10-27)

FSU researchers investigate material properties for longer-lasting, more efficient solar cells
FSU researchers are helping to understand the fundamental processes in a material known as perovskites, work that could lead to more efficient solar cells that also do a better job of resisting degradation. (2020-10-26)

Do the twist: Making two-dimensional quantum materials using curved surfaces
Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have discovered a way to control the growth of twisting, microscopic spirals of materials just one atom thick. The continuously twisting stacks of two-dimensional materials built by a team led by UW-Madison chemistry Professor Song Jin create new properties that scientists can exploit to study quantum physics on the nanoscale. (2020-10-22)

Crystal structure of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein RNA binding domain reveals potential unique drug targeting sites
Crystal structure of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein RNA binding domain reveals potential unique drug targeting sites. (2020-10-20)

Scientists discover unusual materials properties at ultrahigh pressure
An international team of scientists from NUST MISIS (Russia), Linköping University (Sweden) and University of Bayreuth (Germany) found that, contrary to the usual physical and chemical laws, the structure of some materials does not condense at ultrahigh pressures. Actually, it forms a porous framework filled with gas molecules. This happened with samples of Os, Hf, and W put together with N in a diamond anvil at a pressure of one million atmospheres. The discovery is described in Angewandte Chemie. (2020-10-20)

Making new materials using AI
POSTECH Professors Daesu Lee and Si-Young Choi's joint research team demonstrates a novel physical phenomenon by controlling variations of the atomic structure. (2020-10-14)

Well-formed disorder for versatile light technologies
Researchers at ETH have managed to make an efficient material for broadband frequency doubling of light using microspheres made of disordered nanocrystals. The crucial idea for the method arose during a coffee break. In the future, the new approach could be used in lasers and other light technologies. (2020-10-13)

Chemists create new crystal form of insecticide, boosting its ability to fight mosquitoes and malaria
Through a simple process of heating and cooling, New York University researchers have created a new crystal form of deltamethrin -- a common insecticide used to control malaria -- resulting in an insecticide that is up to 12 times more effective against mosquitoes than the existing form. (2020-10-12)

Sapphires show their true colors: Not water-loving
The researchers investigated the wetting behavior of four different crystal surfaces of sapphire (alumina) single crystal and found that although the surface of polycrystalline alumina is hydrophilic (water contact angle was about 10°), the intrinsic water contact angles of all four crystal surfaces are greater than 10°. Among them, the (1-102) crystal surface is intrinsic hydrophobic, which water contact angle is close to 90°. (2020-10-10)

Future ocean conditions could cause significant physical changes in marine mussels
Scientists from the University of Plymouth showed increased temperature and acidification of our oceans over the next century could have a range of effects on an economically important marine species (2020-10-09)

New techniques probe vital and elusive proteins
Researchers at the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery and ASU's School of Molecular Sciences, along with their colleagues, investigate a critically important class of proteins, which adorn the outer membranes of cells. Such membrane proteins often act as receptors for binding molecules, initiating signals that can alter cell behavior in a variety of ways. (2020-10-06)

Tohoku University teaches old spectroscope new tricks
Tohoku University researchers have improved a method for probing semiconducting crystals with light to detect defects and impurities. The details of their 'omnidirectional photoluminescence (ODPL) spectroscopy' set-up were published in the journal Applied Physics Express, and could help improve the fabrication of materials for electric cars and solar cells. (2020-10-05)

Stable supramolecular structure system to identify activity origin of CO2 electroreduction
N-doped or N-heterocyclic nanostructured electrocatalysts for electrocatalytic CO2 reduction reaction have made important progress in product selectivity. For further development, it is significant to identify exactly activity origin of these electrocatalysts. Crystal electrocatalysts with accurate structure can provide a visual research platform for identifying catalytic active sites and studying reaction mechanism. The catalytic activity of pyridine N for CO2 electroreduction was firstly determined structurally by crystal supramolecular coordination compound model system. (2020-09-28)

Lipids, lysosomes, and autophagy: The keys to preventing kidney injury
Lysosomes are cellular waste disposal organelles containing potent enzymes that cause cellular damage if they leak out of ruptured lysosomes. In a recent study led by Osaka University, researchers found that several distinct pathways involved in the repair or elimination of damaged lysosomes work together in response to lysosomal damage. The proper activation and function of these pathways was essential for preventing kidney injury in a mouse model of oxalate crystal-induced kidney damage. (2020-09-28)

FSU researchers help develop sustainable polymers
Researchers at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering have made new discoveries on the effects of temperature on sustainable polymers. Their findings may help the industry to produce plastics that are better for the environment. (2020-09-25)

New materials: A toggle switch for catalysis
A special material made of lanthanum, strontium, iron and oxygen can be switched back and forth between two different states: In one state the material is catalytically extremely active, in the other less so. The reason for this is the behavior of tiny iron nanoparticles on the surface. This finding should now make it possible to develop even better catalysts. (2020-09-23)

Having a ball: Crystallization in a sphere
Researchers at The University of Tokyo and Fudan University furthered our understanding of the crystallization process in confined spaces by visualizing the ordering of colloidal particles in a droplet. The team conducted real-time microscopic observations of the assembly of colloidal particles in droplets to clarify the crystallization process. They found that the kinetically controlled interactions between particles affected the order of the final crystal. Their results take us closer to realizing controlled crystal formation. (2020-09-21)

Defying a 150-year-old rule for phase behavior
Today, researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology and University Paris-Saclay are defying a classical theory from American physicist Josiah Willard Gibbs, with proof of a five-phase equilibrium, something that many scholars considered impossible. (2020-09-18)

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