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Current Crystals News and Events

Current Crystals News and Events, Crystals News Articles.
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X-ray laser sight reveals drug targets
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have published a review on serial femtosecond crystallography, one of the most promising methods for analyzing the tertiary structure of proteins. (2019-07-19)
'Crystal clocks' used to time magma storage before volcanic eruptions
The molten rock that feeds volcanoes can be stored in the Earth's crust for as long as a thousand years, a result which may help with volcanic hazard management and better forecasting of when eruptions might occur. (2019-07-18)
2D perovskite materials found to have unique, conductive edge states
A new class of 2D perovskite materials with edges that are conductive like metals and cores that are insulating was found by researchers who said these unique properties have applications in solar cells and nanoelectronics. (2019-07-15)
Coral skeleton crystals record ocean acidification
The acidification of the oceans is recorded in the crystals of the coral skeleton. (2019-07-11)
A crystal clear step closer to commerical solar cells
Record-breaking, high-efficiency single crystals bring perovskite solar cells closer to market. (2019-07-11)
Giving nanowires a DNA-like twist
Argonne National Laboratory played a critical role in the discovery of a DNA-like twisted crystal structure created with a germanium sulfide nanowire, also known as a 'van der Waals material.' Researchers can tailor these nanowires in many different ways -- twist periods from two to twenty micrometers, lengths up to hundreds of micrometers, and radial dimensions from several hundred nanometers to about ten micrometers. (2019-07-10)
Researchers discover semiconducting nanotubes that form spontaneously
EPFL researchers have discovered a way of making semiconducting, photoluminescent nanotubes form spontaneously in liquid solutions. (2019-07-08)
A new way of making complex structures in thin films
Self-assembling materials called block copolymers, which are known to form a variety of predictable, regular patterns, can now be made into much more complex patterns that might someday be useful for making optical or plasmonic devices (in which electromagnetic waves interact with electrons), according to an MIT study. (2019-07-05)
UH researcher reports the way sickle cells form may be key to stopping them
University of Houston chemist Vassiliy Lubchenko is reporting a new finding in Nature Communications on how sickle cells are formed, which may lead not only to stopping their formation, but to new avenues for making uniformly-sized nanoparticles for industry. (2019-07-02)
UIC, AbbVie scientists develop a novel device to screen advanced crystalline materials
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and AbbVie Inc. have developed a novel device that will help scientists and pharmaceutical companies more effectively screen and test formation of drug substance -- active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). (2019-06-26)
A better way to encapsulate islet cells for diabetes treatment
MIT researchers have come up with a novel way to prevent fibrosis, which can lead to rejection of implantable medical devices, by incorporating a crystallized immunosuppressant drug into the devices. (2019-06-26)
The making of 'warm ice'
The Center for Convergence Property Measurement, Frontier in Extreme Physics Team at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) succeeded in creating room-temperature ice and controlling its growth behaviors by dynamically compressing water up to pressures above 10,000 atmospheres. (2019-06-25)
'Bathtub rings' around Titan's lakes might be made of alien crystals
The frigid lakeshores of Saturn's moon Titan might be encrusted with strange, unearthly minerals, according to new research being presented at the 2019 Astrobiology Science Conference, June 24-28, co-hosted by AGU and NASA in Bellevue, Wa. (2019-06-24)
Researchers explain visible light from 2D lead halide perovskites
Researchers led by an electrical engineer from the University of Houston have reported solving a lingering question about how a two-dimensional crystal composed of cesium, lead and bromine emitted a strong green light, opening the door to designing better light-emitting and diagnostic devices. (2019-06-24)
Electron-behaving nanoparticles rock current understanding of matter
Northwestern University researchers have made a strange and startling discovery that nanoparticles engineered with DNA in colloidal crystals -- when extremely small -- behave just like electrons. (2019-06-20)
Crystal with a twist: Scientists grow spiraling new material
Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have created new inorganic crystals made of stacks of atomically thin sheets that unexpectedly spiral like a nanoscale card deck. (2019-06-20)
The secret of platinum deposits revealed by field observations in South Africa
There are two competing ideas of how platinum deposits formed: the first involves gravity-induced settling of crystals on the chamber floor, while the second idea implies that the crystals grow in situ, directly on the floor of the magmatic chamber. (2019-06-19)
Freezing bubbles viral video inspired research published
The mesmerizing sight of ice crystals floating around the bubble made the engineers wonder what caused the phenomenon (2019-06-19)
News from the diamond nursery
Unlike flawless gems, fibrous diamonds often contain small saline inclusions. (2019-06-19)
Tuning into the LCDs of tomorrow: Exploring the novel IGZO-11 semiconductor
Indium-gallium-zinc oxide ceramics are used as the backplane for flat-panel displays, this was made possible through substantial synergistic contributions coming from the powerhouse that is Japan. (2019-06-17)
Binary solvent mixture boosting high efficiency of polymer solar cells
CB, CF and their mixture were selected as solvents to regulate molecular order and the nanoscale morphology of the photoactive layer. (2019-06-12)
Engineers use graph networks to accurately predict properties of molecules and crystals
Nanoengineers at UC San Diego have developed new deep learning models that can accurately predict the properties of molecules and crystals. (2019-06-10)
UCI scientists create new class of two-dimensional materials
Oxide perovskite crystals have many interesting physical and chemical properties, and materials science engineers would like to fabricate them as two-dimensional layers for use in advanced electronics and, potentially, quantum computers. (2019-06-06)
Probing semiconductor crystals with a sphere of light
Tohoku University researchers have developed a technique using a hollow sphere to measure the electronic and optical properties of large semiconducting crystals. (2019-06-06)
Jam-packed: A novel microscopic approach to amorphous solids
Researchers at the University of Tokyo have developed a new method for understanding the structure organization of disordered materials fundamentally different from previous geometric approaches of ordered crystals. (2019-06-05)
2D crystals conforming to 3D curves create strain for engineering quantum devices
A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory explored how atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals can grow over 3D objects and how the curvature of those objects can stretch and strain the crystals. (2019-06-03)
New substance can form in the OA process of crystal growth, new study reveals
Chinese scientists from the Institute of Solid State Physics (ISSP) under the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science of the Chinese Academy of Scienceshave revealed that a new substance can form during the oriented attachment (OA) process of crystal growth, which may shed new light on the microscopic mechanism of crystal growth. (2019-05-29)
Scientists offer designer 'big atoms' on demand
Physicists report that they can build and control particles that behave like tiny atoms with a precision never seen before. (2019-05-29)
Researchers introduce novel heat transport theory in quest for efficient thermoelectrics
NCCR MARVEL researchers have developed a novel microscopic theory that is able to describe heat transport in very general ways, and applies equally well to ordered or disordered materials such as crystals or glasses and to anything in between. (2019-05-28)
Imperfection is OK for better MOFs
Imaging defects in MOF crystals, and monitoring how they develop, will allow control of defect formation to design better MOFs for many applications. (2019-05-27)
Scientists (dis)solve a century-long mystery to treat asthma and airway inflammation
Belgian research groups from the VIB, Ghent University, Ghent University Hospital, and the biotech company argenx have solved a century-long puzzle about the presence of protein crystals in asthma. (2019-05-23)
How to enlarge 2D materials as single crystals?
IBS scientists have presented a novel approach to synthesize large-scale of silicon wafer size, single crystalline 2D materials.They have found a substrate with a lower order of symmetry than that of a 2D material that facilitates the synthesis of single crystalline 2D materials in a large area. (2019-05-22)
Original kilogram replaced -- new International System of Units (SI) entered into force
In addition to Ampere, Kelvin, Mol and Co., the kilogram also is now defined by a natural constant. (2019-05-21)
New technique prepares 2D perovskite single crystals for highest photodetectivity
A research group led by Professor Liu Shengzhong from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Dr. (2019-05-15)
From Earth's deep mantle, scientists find a new way volcanoes form
Far below Bermuda's pink sand beaches and turquoise tides, geoscientists have discovered the first direct evidence that material from deep within Earth's mantle transition zone -- a layer rich in water, crystals and melted rock -- can percolate to the surface to form volcanoes. (2019-05-15)
Copper oxide photocathodes: laser experiment reveals location of efficiency loss
Solar cells and photocathodes made of copper oxide might in theory attain high efficiencies for solar energy conversion. (2019-05-09)
New approach for solving protein structures from tiny crystals
Scientists have developed a new approach for solving atomic-scale 3-D protein structures from tiny crystals. (2019-05-03)
Resolving the 'invisible' gold puzzle
In Carlin-type gold deposits, which make up 75% of the US production, gold does not occur in the form of nuggets or veins, but is hidden -- together with arsenic -- in pyrite, also known as 'fool's gold.' A team of scientists has now shown for the first time that the concentration of gold directly depends on the content of arsenic in the pyrite. (2019-05-01)
Unprecedented insight into two-dimensional magnets using diamond quantum sensors
For the first time, physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale. (2019-04-25)
Frustrated materials under high pressure
People are not the only ones to be occasionally frustrated. (2019-04-24)
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