Current Cystic fibrosis News and Events

Current Cystic fibrosis News and Events, Cystic fibrosis News Articles.
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New therapy for flu may help in fight against COVID-19
A new therapy for influenza virus infections that may also prove effective against many other pathogenic virus infections, including HIV and COVID-19, has been developed by Purdue University scientists. The Purdue team's approach uses a targeted therapy approach against the virus infections. (2020-11-24)

Stem cell transplantation: undesirable rejection mechanism identified
In the treatment of leukaemia, stem cell transplantation subsequent to chemotherapy and radiation can often engender severe adverse inflammatory reactions - especially in the skin or in the gut, since these so-called barrier organs are more frequently affected. Up until now, the reason for this was unclear. A team of researchers in Vienna has now identified an immune mechanism that is partially responsible for this. (2020-11-19)

Understanding lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis
For young people with cystic fibrosis, lung infection with Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, is common and is treated with antibiotics in the hope that this will prevent a decline in lung function. However there has recently been debate over the role S. aureus plays in CF lung disease. Researchers from the University of Warwick have used a new model of CF lungs which could be used to make better decisions about future use of antibiotics. (2020-11-19)

Which particulate air pollution poses the greatest health risk?
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, together with colleagues from several other European institutions, have investigated whether particulate matter from certain sources can be especially harmful to human health. They found evidence that the amount of particulate matter alone is not the greatest health risk. Rather, it could be the so-called oxidative potential that makes particulate pollution so harmful. They are publishing their results today in the scientific journal Nature. (2020-11-18)

Liver condition identified in patients using urine samples: new research
Fifty fragments of proteins, termed peptides, have been identified in the urine of liver fibrosis patients in a new study that could pave the way for a potential diagnostic urine test for the condition if further validated. (2020-11-16)

A change of heart -- new drug for HCM reduces heart mass
For the first time, a medication has impacted heart muscle thickness and function for patients with the most common inherited heart condition, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rather than simply addressing their symptoms. (2020-11-16)

One step for fibrosis, one giant leap for scleroderma
At the Medical University of South Carolina, a team of researchers has demonstrated a ''moonlighting'' role for lysyl oxidase (LOX) in scleroderma. It was previously known that LOX crosslinked the connective tissue. However, this research showed that, independent of its crosslinking function, LOX plays multiple additional roles in promoting fibrosis in scleroderma, known as ''moonlighting.'' Furthermore, these researchers demonstrated that LOX could be a potential biomarker and target for antifibrotic therapy. (2020-11-16)

Targeted therapies developed to reduce lung fibrosis
A new treatment option for lung fibrosis is being developed by Purdue University scientists. People with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have a life expectancy of less than five years. The Purdue team has developed two targeted therapies for people with IPF. (2020-11-11)

Liver scarring relatively common among middle-aged adults
A substantial minority of participants from the Framingham Heart Study, (nearly nine percent), had potentially clinically significant liver fibrosis (scarring). This the first study of this size and scale done in the United States. (2020-11-09)

Genetic mutation could worsen heart function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients
DALLAS - Nov. 4, 2020 - A mutation in the gene that causes cystic fibrosis may accelerate heart function decline in those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a new study by UT Southwestern researchers suggests. The findings, published online recently in the Journal of the American Heart Association, could help doctors develop new strategies to preserve heart function in this population, potentially extending patients' lives. (2020-11-04)

Promising therapeutic approach against COPD
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common and deadliest diseases worldwide. Until today, COPD is not curable. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now succeeded in curing COPD in mice exposed to chronic cigarette smoke. Their goal is to test the novel therapeutic approach in human clinical trials over the next few years. (2020-11-04)

SARS-CoV-2 might attack red marrow and block new erythrocytes formation
Specialists from the Department of Fundamental Medicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with Russian and Japanese colleagues have probed into mechanisms of COVID-19 inside-the-body distribution linked to erythrocytes damaging. According to researchers, virus might attack red marrow, thus being detrimental not only for erythrocytes in the bloodstream but also for the process of the formation of the new ones. A related article appears in Archiv EuroMedica. (2020-10-30)

Let's (not) stick together
New research led by the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering examines the properties of the mucus of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the role it plays in a pathogens' ability to survive. The new information could have important implications for CF treatment. (2020-10-28)

Researchers create human airway stem cells from patients' cells
For the first time, researchers have successfully created airway basal stem cells in vitro from induced pluripotent stem cells by reprogramming blood cells taken from patients. Given that airway basal cells are defined as stem cells of the airways because they can regenerate the airway epithelium in response to injury, this study may help accelerate research on diseases impacting the airway, including COVID-19, influenza, asthma and cystic fibrosis. (2020-10-23)

Immune activation in the liver illuminated with new glycan-tagging strategy
A signaling system implicated in liver fibrosis and immune activation is better understood thanks to this creative chemical fishing lure. (2020-10-19)

Ultrasound technique offers more precise, quantified assessments of lung health
Researchers have developed a technique that uses ultrasound to provide non-invasive assessments of pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary edema. The technique has been shown to both quantify lung scarring and detect lung fluid in rats. A study on pulmonary edema in humans is under way. (2020-10-15)

Even mild fatty liver disease is linked to increased mortality
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD, affects nearly one in four adults in Europe and the U.S. Earlier research has demonstrated an increased risk of death in patients with NAFLD and advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Massachusetts General Hospital in the U.S. show that mortality increases with disease severity, but even mild fatty liver disease is linked to higher mortality. The findings have been published in the journal Gut. (2020-10-12)

Pulmonary artery thrombosis a complication of radiation therapy
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, the imaging findings of in situ pulmonary artery thrombosis (PAT) associated with radiation therapy (RT) are different from those of acute pulmonary emboli and do not appear to embolize. Due to the differences in clinical prognosis and subsequent management strategies, in situ PAT associated with RT -- which has not previously been described in the English literature -- must be distinguished from pulmonary embolism. (2020-10-09)

Mechanical forces of biofilms could play role in infections
Studying bacterial biofilms, EPFL scientists have discovered that mechanical forces within them are sufficient to deform the soft material they grow on, e.g. biological tissues, suggesting a ''mechanical'' mode of bacterial infection. (2020-10-08)

Treating cystic fibrosis with mRNA therapy or CRISPR
The potential for treating cystic fibrosis (CF) using mRNA therapies or CRISPR gene editing is possible regardless of the causative mutation. CF clinical trials showing that a genotype-agnostic gene therapy for CF is possible (2020-10-08)

Igniting the synthetic transport of amino acids in living cells
Researchers from ICIQ's Ballester group and IRBBarcelona's Palacín group have published a paper in Chem showing how a synthetic carrier calix[4]pyrrole cavitand can transport amino acids across liposome and cell membranes bringing future therapies a step closer. (2020-10-06)

Gene expression altered by direction of forces acting on cell
Tissues and cells in the human body are subjected to a constant push and pull - strained by other cells, blood pressure and fluid flow, to name a few. The type and direction of the force on a cell alters gene expression by stretching different regions of DNA, researchers at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and collaborators in China found in a new study. (2020-10-01)

Landmark clinical trial shows effectiveness of oral antibiotics in treating cystic fibrosis condition
A major national study led by experts from Bristol and Nottingham has found that oral antibiotics are just as effective as intravenous antibiotics in killing a common germ that causes dangerous complications in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. (2020-09-29)

A step toward helping patients breathe deeply
In a new study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) report that a protein called TL1A drives fibrosis in several mouse models, triggering tissue remodeling, and making it harder for lungs and airways to function normally. (2020-09-24)

BU researchers discover how COVID-19 may trigger fatal levels of lung inflammation
Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, requires models that can duplicate disease development in humans, identify potential targets and enable drug testing. Specifically, access to primary human lung in vitro model systems is a priority since a variety of respiratory epithelial cells are the proposed targets of viral entry. (2020-09-21)

New high-speed test shows how antibiotics combine to kill bacteria
Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method to determine - rapidly, easily and cheaply - how effective two antibiotics combined can be in stopping bacterial growth. The new method is simple for laboratories to use and can provide greater scope for customising treatment of bacterial infections. The study is published in PLOS Biology. (2020-09-17)

New treatments for deadly lung disease could be revealed by 3D modeling
A 3D bioengineered model of lung tissue built by University of Michigan researchers is poking holes in decades worth of flat, Petri dish observations into how the deadly disease pulmonary fibrosis progresses. (2020-09-14)

Excessive lung release of neutrophil DNA traps may explain severe complications in Covid-19 patients
Researchers from the University of Liège (Belgium) has detected significant amounts of DNA traps in distinct compartments of the lungs of patients who died from Covid-19. These traps, called NETs, are released massively into the airways, the lung tissue and the blood vessels. Such excessive release could be a major contributor to severe disease complications leading to in-hospital death. These results are published this week in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. (2020-09-14)

Drugging the undruggable: Yale finds treatment path for muscular dystrophy
Researchers at Yale have identified a possible treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a rare genetic disease for which there is currently no cure or treatment, by targeting an enzyme that had been considered ''undruggable.'' The finding appears in the Aug. 25 edition of Science Signaling. (2020-09-11)

UNC researchers publish striking images of SARS-CoV-2 infected cells
The UNC School of Medicine laboratory of Camille Ehre, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, produced striking images in respiratory tract cultures of the infectious form of the SARS-CoV-2 virus produced by infected respiratory epithelial cells. The New England Journal of Medicine featured this work in its 'Images in Medicine' section. (2020-09-10)

Rare immune cells drive gut repair
Scientists from King's College London have discovered an unexpected tissue reparative role for a rare immune cell type in the gut that could tip toward fibrosis or cancer if dysregulated. The breakthrough will have important implications for treating patients who suffer from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. (2020-09-07)

New method of detecting illnesses including coronavirus and cystic fibrosis
A new and quicker method of diagnosing diseases in patients has been created by researchers. The team has developed a system of examining individual molecules to detect the presence of disease in blood. (2020-09-02)

Immune protein IL-17A responsible for lethal side effects of gastric cancer
The formation of scar tissue, or fibrosis, as gastric cancer disseminates throughout the peritoneum can be more lethal than the cancer itself and can interfere with chemotherapy. Researchers from Kanazawa University have now found that proinflammatory cytokine IL-17A from mast cells heavily influences the degree of fibrosis and causes structural changes in peritoneal cells. Preventing mast cells from releasing IL-17A may therefore be a promising treatment strategy for gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination. (2020-08-26)

New insights into mechanism of therapy to reduce liver fat and prevent fibrosis
A team led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has taken an important step forward in the goal of developing a potential treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. (2020-08-26)

Researchers show children are silent spreaders of virus that causes COVID-19
Researchers provide critical data showing that children play a larger role in the community spread of COVID-19 than previously thought. (2020-08-20)

Research reveals cilia's role in cardiovascular functions and genetic diseases
Research from Chapman University discover ciliary extracellular-like vesicles (cELVs). Released by fluid-shear, cELVs act as nano-compartments within a cilium. Proteomic identification reveals the role of cELVs in human genetic diseases and cardiovascular functions. (2020-08-20)

Electronic consultations between primary providers and radiologists improve patient care
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), the eConsult electronic consultation system allowed primary care providers to easily consult with radiologists, was perceived as high value by primary care providers, resulted in altered patient management, and avoided unnecessary imaging tests. ''We identified follow-up imaging of cystic lesions and imaging workup of pain in patients as opportunities for continuing medical education for primary care providers,'' the AJR authors wrote. (2020-08-19)

Protein produced by the nervous system may help treatments for inflammatory diseases
A Rutgers-led team discover a protein produced by nervous system may be key to treating inflammatory diseases like asthma, allergies, chronic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (2020-08-17)

Exercise induces secretion of biomarkers into sweat
The aim was to reveal the potential of microRNAs in sweat extracellular vesicles in monitoring exercise performance. (2020-08-12)

The CNIO pave the way for a future gene therapy to reverse pulmonary fibrosis associated with ageing
''Our results indicate that a new therapy may be developed to prevent the development of pulmonary fibrosis associated with ageing,'' says CNIO's Maria Blasco, principal investigator of the study * Lung tissue of patients with pulmonary fibrosis does not regenerate because the cells involved in lung generation have damaged telomeres, the ends of the chromosomes. The new study describes a gene therapy that activates the enzyme that repairs telomeres (2020-08-10)

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