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Current Cytoplasm News and Events

Current Cytoplasm News and Events, Cytoplasm News Articles.
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Parasitology: Mother cells as organelle donors
Microbiologists at LMU and UoG have discovered a recycling process in the eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii that plays a vital role in the organism's unusual mode of reproduction. (2019-09-13)
Nobel Laureate, Tom Cech, Ph.D., suggests new way to target third most common oncogene, TERT
Study in PNAS shows that trapping TERT mRNA in the cell nucleus may keep TERT oncogene from being manufactured, silencing the action of TERT in driving cancer. (2019-09-10)
Moving faster in a crowd
Cell particles move more quickly through a crowded cellular environment when the crowding molecules are non-uniformly distributed. (2019-08-30)
Northern white rhino eggs successfully fertilized
After successfully harvesting 10 eggs from the world's last two northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu, on August 22nd in Kenya, the international consortium of scientists and conservationists announces that 7 out of the 10 eggs (4 from Fatu and 3 from Najin) were successfully matured and artificially inseminated. (2019-08-26)
Sticky proteins help plants know when -- and where -- to grow
When it comes to plant growth and development, one hormone is responsible for it all: auxin. (2019-08-14)
Cell biology: Compartments and complexity
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists have taken a closer look at the subcellular distribution of proteins and metabolic intermediates in a model plant. (2019-08-13)
Lupus antibody target identified
Researchers have identified a specific target of antibodies that are implicated in the neuropsychiatric symptoms of lupus, according to human research published in JNeurosci. (2019-08-12)
Smuggling route for cells protects DNA from parasites
An international research team has now uncovered new insight into how safety mechanisms keep genetic parasites in check so that they do not damage the genome. (2019-08-09)
Closing the door: breaking new ground related to a potential anticancer drug target
In order to sustain fast growth, cancer cells need to take up nutrients at a faster rate than healthy cells. (2019-07-31)
Discovery could lead to new treatments for Parkinson's, other brain diseases
A small protein previously associated with cellular dysfunction and death in fact serves a critical function in repairing breaks in DNA, according to new research. (2019-07-29)
Rotavirus cell invasion triggers a cacophony of calcium signals
Time-lapsing imaging and other experimental approaches reveal that rotavirus induces hundreds of discrete and highly dynamic calcium spikes that increase during peak infection. (2019-07-25)
Living components
Programmable structural dynamics successful for first time in self-organizing fiber structures (2019-07-22)
New insight into microRNA function can give gene therapy a boost
Scientists at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Oxford have shown that small RNA molecules occurring naturally in cells, i.e. microRNAs, are also abundant in cell nuclei. (2019-07-17)
Mystery of immunosuppressive drug's biosynthesis finally unlocked
The biogenesis of mycophenolic acid (MPA), an old and important molecule, has remained an unsolved mystery for more than a century. (2019-06-21)
Preventing drugs from being transported
A research team has investigated the transport mechanism of a bacterial membrane protein using an artificially produced antibody fragment. (2019-06-17)
How the cell protects itself
The cell contains transcripts of the genetic material, which migrate from the cell nucleus to another part of the cell. (2019-06-12)
Scientists discover signalling circuit boards inside body's cells
Cells in the body are wired like computer chips to direct signals that instruct how they function, research from the University of Edinburgh suggests. (2019-05-24)
New technique promises improved metastatic prostate cancer detection
Results reported in Biomicrofluidics promise a new way to detect prostate cancer through a simple device, which forces cell samples through channels less than 10 microns wide. (2019-05-21)
Cell polarity -- An aurora over the pole
A recent research led by Assistant Professor Fumio Motegi, Principal Investigator at the Mechanobiology Institute at the National University of Singapore, has identified the master switch that triggers the symmetry breaking process in the zygotes of the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. (2019-05-17)
Why Hodgkin's lymphoma cells grow uncontrollably
Although classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is generally easily treatable today, many aspects of the disease still remain a mystery. (2019-05-13)
Keeping things in proportion: Lem2 necessary for nuclear scaling
A research team led by Hiroshima University found that inner nuclear membrane protein Lem2, backed up by endoplasmic reticulum protein Lnp1, acts as a valve to control the flow of the membrane into and out of the nuclear envelope. (2019-05-13)
How the cytoplasm separates from the yolk
The segregation of yolk from the surrounding cytoplasm in the very early fish embryo is a key process for the development of the fish larva. (2019-05-09)
Study reveals amyloid clumps of a truncated p53 structure related to endometrial cancer
Brazilian scientists have discovered that a truncated variant of the tumor suppressor protein p53 is present as amyloid aggregates in endometrial cancer cells. (2019-05-03)
What happens in the bodies of ALS patients?
Lara Marrone and Jared Sterneckert from the Centre for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at Technische Universit├Ąt Dresden (TUD), together with collaborating scientists from Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and the USA, have now discovered that interactions between RNA-binding proteins are more critical to ALS pathogenesis than previously thought. (2019-04-15)
Designer organelles bring new functionalities into cells
For the first time, scientists have engineered the complex biological process of translation into a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell. (2019-03-28)
Solving the efficiency of Gram-negative bacteria
Superbugs, also known as Gram-negative bacteria, are causing a global health crisis. (2019-03-21)
Selfish genetic elements amplify inflammation and age-related diseases
Researchers from the University of Rochester show that LINE1 retrotransposons, a class of selfish genetic elements, become more active with age and may cause age-related diseases by triggering inflammation. (2019-03-11)
The ABS of molecular engines
Peroxisomes are cell organelles that carry out a number of functions, including the degradation of cytotoxins. (2019-03-08)
Researchers find the immune system's unknown messenger
A previously unknown messenger which alarms nearby cells when the immune system recognises a bacterial or viral infection has been uncovered. (2019-02-25)
Lobster's underbelly is as tough as industrial rubber
Flip a lobster on its back, and you'll see that the underside of its tail is split in segments connected by a translucent membrane that appears rather vulnerable when compared with the armor-like carapace that shields the rest of the crustacean. (2019-02-19)
Biologists answer fundamental question about cell size
MIT biologists have discovered why cell sizes are so tightly regulated. (2019-02-07)
A solid scaffolding for our cells
To perform properly the task for which they have been synthesized, proteins must first assemble to form effective cellular 'machines'. (2019-01-28)
A protein that makes skin cancer cells more invasive
Loss of a protein called TRIM29 promotes cancer cell invasion in a common type of skin cancer, suggesting a novel diagnostic marker and a possible therapeutic target. (2018-11-20)
Solving the mystery of NPM1 in acute myeloid leukemia
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells expressing the NPM1 mutant gene are highly dependent on continued export of protein NPM1c to proliferate. (2018-11-13)
Researchers closer to gonorrhea vaccine after exhaustive analysis of proteins
In a study of proteins historic in its scope, researchers have pushed closer both to a vaccine for gonorrhea and toward understanding why the bacteria that cause the disease are so good at fending off antimicrobial drugs. (2018-11-08)
Novel quantum dots enhance cell imaging
A team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Mayo Clinic have engineered a new type of molecular probe that can measure and count RNA in cells and tissue without organic dyes. (2018-10-29)
Early changes to synapse gene regulation may cause Alzheimer's disease
TMDU-led Japanese research revealed a role for splicing proteins in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. (2018-10-12)
Researchers explain how viral protein promotes deadly infection by Nipah and Hendra viruses
Researchers have identified how a viral protein, which plays a major role in causing deadly Nipah and Hendra virus infections, targets a critical function in human cells to suppress immune responses and promote fatal disease. (2018-09-12)
Mitochondria come together to kill cancer cells
Uncovered details of a molecular pathway in cancer cells could lead to improved treatment. (2018-09-12)
Folding poisons
Researchers show how toxins of the bacterium Clostridium difficile get into cells in the gut. (2018-09-11)
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