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Current Cytoplasm News and Events

Current Cytoplasm News and Events, Cytoplasm News Articles.
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Scientists edge closer to treatment for myotonic dystrophy
Scientists at the University of Nottingham have taken a step closer towards developing a treatment for the long-term genetic disorder, myotonic dystrophy. (2020-04-29)
Ion channel VRAC enhances immune response against viruses
VRAC/LRRC8 chloride channels do not only play a decisive role in the transport of cytostatics, amino acids and neurotransmitters. (2020-04-10)
Mutation reduces energy waste in plants
In a way, plants are energy wasters: in order to protect themselves from excessive electron transport, they continuously quench light energy and don't use it for photosynthesis and biomass production. (2020-04-08)
Pancreatic cancer blocked by disrupting cellular pH balance
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys have found a new way to kill pancreatic cancer cells by disrupting their pH equilibrium. (2020-04-07)
Understanding the HIV-1 rev regulatory axis may help researchers to halt AIDS progression
HIV infection and replication within a human cell is a complex mechanism that involves multiple steps and several biochemical factors such as nucleic acids and proteins. (2020-03-31)
Discovery that cells inject each other opens new line of attack on cancer
Discovery of an entirely new source of cancer cell diversity has profound implications for cancer research and treatment, research from the University of Sydney has found. (2020-03-24)
The growth of an organism rides on a pattern of waves
Study shows ripples across a newly fertilized egg are similar to other systems, from ocean and atmospheric circulations to quantum fluids. (2020-03-23)
Cancer diagnostics
A good indicator of dysregulation in live cells is a change in their RNA expression. (2020-03-16)
New mechanism involved in senescence modulates inflammation, response to immunotherapy
Wistar scientists discovered a novel pathway that enables detection of DNA in the cytoplasm and triggers inflammation and cellular senescence. (2020-02-19)
Studies of membrane vesicles pave the way to innovative treatments of degenerative diseases
Membrane vesicles can become a new therapeutic tool in regenerative medicine and a new class of effective and safe medications. (2020-01-15)
Sensing protein wellbeing
The folding state of the proteins in live cells often reflect the cell's general health. (2020-01-09)
Molecular factories: The combination between nature and chemistry is functional
Researchers at the University of Basel have succeeded in developing molecular factories that mimic nature. (2020-01-09)
Researchers map malaria parasites proliferate in human blood cells
Malaria parasites transform healthy red blood cells into rigid versions of themselves that clump together, hindering the transportation of oxygen. (2019-12-25)
Virus multiplication in 3D
Vaccinia viruses serve as a vaccine against human smallpox and as the basis of new cancer therapies. (2019-12-12)
Host cell proteases can process viral capsid proteins
It has long been suggested that a cell protease could take part in enterovirus infection. (2019-12-04)
Biophysics: Pattern formation on the cheap
Many cellular processes involve patterned distributions of proteins. Scientists have identified the minimal set of elements required for the autonomous formation of one such pattern, thus enabling the basic phenomenology to be explored. (2019-12-02)
New principle for activation of cancer genes discovered
Researchers have long known that some genes can cause cancer when overactive, but exactly what happens inside the cell nucleus when the cancer grows has so far remained enigmatic. (2019-11-29)
Silencing retroviruses to awaken cell potential
Silencing of retroviruses in the human genome is a crucial step in the production of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic cells. (2019-11-27)
Article proposes important mucin link between microbial infections and many cancers
In a review article, cancer biologists Pinku Mukherjee and Mukulika Bose argue that recent research suggests a mechanism that may implicate bacterial infections as important factors in epithelial cell cancers. (2019-11-18)
Cytoplasm of scrambled frog eggs organizes into cell-like structures, Stanford study finds
The cytoplasm of ruptured Xenopus frog eggs spontaneously reorganizes into cell-like compartments, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2019-11-06)
Argonaute proteins help fine-tune gene expression
A protein, with a name reminiscent of legendary Greek sailors, has an unexpected role inside the human nucleus. (2019-10-28)
Cell stiffness may indicate whether tumors will invade
Engineers at MIT and elsewhere have tracked the evolution of individual cells within an initially benign tumor, showing how the physical properties of those cells drive the tumor to become invasive, or metastatic. (2019-10-21)
Parasitology: Mother cells as organelle donors
Microbiologists at LMU and UoG have discovered a recycling process in the eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii that plays a vital role in the organism's unusual mode of reproduction. (2019-09-13)
Nobel Laureate, Tom Cech, Ph.D., suggests new way to target third most common oncogene, TERT
Study in PNAS shows that trapping TERT mRNA in the cell nucleus may keep TERT oncogene from being manufactured, silencing the action of TERT in driving cancer. (2019-09-10)
Moving faster in a crowd
Cell particles move more quickly through a crowded cellular environment when the crowding molecules are non-uniformly distributed. (2019-08-30)
Northern white rhino eggs successfully fertilized
After successfully harvesting 10 eggs from the world's last two northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu, on August 22nd in Kenya, the international consortium of scientists and conservationists announces that 7 out of the 10 eggs (4 from Fatu and 3 from Najin) were successfully matured and artificially inseminated. (2019-08-26)
Sticky proteins help plants know when -- and where -- to grow
When it comes to plant growth and development, one hormone is responsible for it all: auxin. (2019-08-14)
Cell biology: Compartments and complexity
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists have taken a closer look at the subcellular distribution of proteins and metabolic intermediates in a model plant. (2019-08-13)
Lupus antibody target identified
Researchers have identified a specific target of antibodies that are implicated in the neuropsychiatric symptoms of lupus, according to human research published in JNeurosci. (2019-08-12)
Smuggling route for cells protects DNA from parasites
An international research team has now uncovered new insight into how safety mechanisms keep genetic parasites in check so that they do not damage the genome. (2019-08-09)
Closing the door: breaking new ground related to a potential anticancer drug target
In order to sustain fast growth, cancer cells need to take up nutrients at a faster rate than healthy cells. (2019-07-31)
Discovery could lead to new treatments for Parkinson's, other brain diseases
A small protein previously associated with cellular dysfunction and death in fact serves a critical function in repairing breaks in DNA, according to new research. (2019-07-29)
Rotavirus cell invasion triggers a cacophony of calcium signals
Time-lapsing imaging and other experimental approaches reveal that rotavirus induces hundreds of discrete and highly dynamic calcium spikes that increase during peak infection. (2019-07-25)
Living components
Programmable structural dynamics successful for first time in self-organizing fiber structures (2019-07-22)
New insight into microRNA function can give gene therapy a boost
Scientists at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Oxford have shown that small RNA molecules occurring naturally in cells, i.e. microRNAs, are also abundant in cell nuclei. (2019-07-17)
Mystery of immunosuppressive drug's biosynthesis finally unlocked
The biogenesis of mycophenolic acid (MPA), an old and important molecule, has remained an unsolved mystery for more than a century. (2019-06-21)
Preventing drugs from being transported
A research team has investigated the transport mechanism of a bacterial membrane protein using an artificially produced antibody fragment. (2019-06-17)
How the cell protects itself
The cell contains transcripts of the genetic material, which migrate from the cell nucleus to another part of the cell. (2019-06-12)
Scientists discover signalling circuit boards inside body's cells
Cells in the body are wired like computer chips to direct signals that instruct how they function, research from the University of Edinburgh suggests. (2019-05-24)
New technique promises improved metastatic prostate cancer detection
Results reported in Biomicrofluidics promise a new way to detect prostate cancer through a simple device, which forces cell samples through channels less than 10 microns wide. (2019-05-21)
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