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Current Dark energy News and Events

Current Dark energy News and Events, Dark energy News Articles.
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New test of dark energy and expansion from cosmic structures
A new paper has shown how large structures in the distribution of galaxies in the Universe provide the most precise tests of dark energy and cosmic expansion yet. (2020-06-03)
Extraordinary modulation of light polarization with dark plasmons in magnetoplasmonic nanocavities
Enhancing magneto-optical effects is crucial for the size reduction of key photonic devices based on non-reciprocal propagation of light and to enable active nanophotonics. (2020-06-02)
Finding balance between green energy storage, harvesting
Generating power through wind or solar energy is dependent on the abundance of the right weather conditions, making finding the optimal strategy for storage crucial to the future of sustainable energy usage. (2020-06-02)
Smart molecules could be key to computers with 100-times bigger memories
Researchers have discovered a single molecule 'switch' that can act like a transistor and offers the potential to store binary information -- such as the 1s and 0s used in classical computing. (2020-06-02)
Class of stellar explosions found to be galactic producers of lithium
A team of researchers, led by astrophysicist Sumner Starrfield of Arizona State University (ASU), has combined theory with both observations and laboratory studies and determined that a class of stellar explosions, called classical novae, are responsible for most of the lithium in our galaxy and solar system. (2020-06-01)
The effectiveness of a heating system is validated, heating air from solar radiation
The device, which takes advantage of heat generated on the outer layer of building facades, could cover the heating required to ventilate a building for up to 75% of the days in a cold season. (2020-05-28)
Technology is studied that could save 12% of the energy used in pressurized irrigation
A study, performed in two Andalusian provinces, analyzed the potential of producing electricity by means of recovering hydraulic energy by implanting new technology based on pumps working as turbines (2020-05-27)
Physicists measure a short-lived radioactive molecule for first time
Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have combined the power of a super collider with techniques of laser spectroscopy to precisely measure a short-lived radioactive molecule, radium monofluoride, for the first time. (2020-05-27)
Going nuclear on the moon and Mars
It might sound like science fiction, but scientists are preparing to build colonies on the moon and, eventually, Mars. (2020-05-20)
Grasshoppers are perfectly aware of their own coloration when trying to camouflage
A research team from the Pablo de Olavide University of Seville, led by Pim Edelaar, has carried out an experimental study that shows that grasshoppers are perfectly aware of their own colouration when choosing the place that provides them with better camouflage. (2020-05-20)
HHU physicists: No evidence of an influence of dark matter on the force between nuclei
Although most of the universe is made up of dark matter, very little is known about it. (2020-05-18)
Exoplanet climate 'decoder' aids search for life
After examining a dozen types of suns and a roster of planet surfaces, Cornell University astronomers have developed a practical model - an environmental color ''decoder'' - to tease out climate clues for potentially habitable exoplanets in galaxies far away. (2020-05-18)
Observation of intervalley transitions can boost valleytronic science and technology
An international research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has observed light emission from a new type of transition between electronic valleys, known as intervalley transmissions. (2020-05-15)
Surrey unveils fast-charging super-capacitor technology
Experts from the University of Surrey believe their dream of clean energy storage is a step closer after they unveiled their ground-breaking super-capacitor technology that is able to store and deliver electricity at high power rates, particularly for mobile applications. (2020-05-14)
Seeing the universe through new lenses
A new study by an international team of scientists revealed hundreds of new strong gravitational lensing candidates based on a deep dive into data collected for a US Department of Energy-supported telescope project in Arizona called the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. (2020-05-14)
Marine waste management: Recycling efficiency by marine microbes
It was only relatively recently that tiny, single-celled thaumarchaea were discovered to exist and thrive in the pelagic ocean, where their population size of roughly 1028 (10 billion quintillion) cells makes them one of the most abundant organisms on our planet. (2020-05-12)
Photosynthesis in a droplet
Researchers develop an artificial chloroplast. (2020-05-11)
Computer vision helps SLAC scientists study lithium ion batteries
New machine learning methods bring insights into how lithium ion batteries degrade, and show it's more complicated than many thought. (2020-05-08)
Our pupil moves to the rhythm of the environment
Regular processes in the environment improve our eyesight. (2020-05-08)
Transporting energy through a single molecular nanowire
Photosynthetic systems in nature transport energy very efficiently towards a reaction center, where it is converted into a useful form for the organism. (2020-05-08)
Telescopes and spacecraft join forces to probe deep into Jupiter's atmosphere
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the ground-based Gemini Observatory in Hawaii have teamed up with the Juno spacecraft to probe the mightiest storms in the solar system, taking place more than 500 million miles away on the giant planet Jupiter. (2020-05-07)
Study: could dark matter be hiding in existing data?
A new study, led by researchers at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley, suggests new paths for catching the signals of dark matter particles that have their energy absorbed by atomic nuclei. (2020-05-04)
Looking for dark matter with the universe's coldest material
A study in PRL reports on how researchers at ICFO have built a spinor BEC comagnetometer, an instrument for studying the axion, a hypothetical particle that may explain the mystery of dark matter. (2020-05-01)
Ending the daily work commute may not cut energy usage as much as one might hope
A mass move to working-from-home accelerated by the Coronavirus pandemic might not be as beneficial to the planet as many hope, according to a new study by the Centre for Research into Energy Demand Solutions (CREDS). (2020-04-30)
Eyes send an unexpected signal to the brain
New research, led by Northwestern University, has found that a subset of retinal neurons sends inhibitory signals to the brain. (2020-04-30)
A census of star brightness: The sun is less active and variable than similar stars
By analyzing the brightness variations of 369 solar-like stars, researchers have concluded that the sun is less magnetically active and shows less variability in its brightness than similar stars in the galaxy. (2020-04-30)
Computational techniques explore 'the dark side of amyloid aggregation in the brain'
As physicians and families know too well, though Alzheimer's disease has been intensely studied for decades, too much is still not known about molecular processes in the brain that cause it. (2020-04-29)
MA3Bi2I9 single-crystal enables X-ray detection down to nanograys per second
A zero-dimensional (0D) MA3Bi2I9 (MA=CH3NH3) single crystals with inch-sized were fabricated by solution methods. (2020-04-28)
Arctic wildlife uses extreme method to save energy
The extreme cold, harsh environment and constant hunt for food means that Arctic animals have become specialists in saving energy. (2020-04-28)
Delivery drones instead of postal vans? Study reveals drones still consume too much energy
When delivering parcels, drones often have a poorer energy balance than traditional delivery vans, as shown by a new study conducted at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg. (2020-04-22)
From Voldemort to Vader, fictional villains may draw us to darker versions of ourselves
According to new research published in the journal Psychological Science, people may find fictional villains surprisingly likeable when they share similarities with the viewer or reader. (2020-04-22)
Coffee changes our sense of taste
Sweet food is even sweeter when you drink coffee. This is shown by the result of research from Aarhus University. (2020-04-21)
Often and little, or rarely and to the full?
If we were talking about food, most experts would choose the former, but in the case of energy storage the opposite is true. (2020-04-20)
Physicists develop approach to increase performance of solar energy
Experimental condensed matter physicists in the Department of Physics at the University of Oklahoma have developed an approach to circumvent a major loss process that currently limits the efficiency of commercial solar cells. (2020-04-20)
Diamonds shine in energy storage solution
QUT researchers have proposed the design of a new carbon nanostructure made from diamond nanothreads that could one day be used for mechanical energy storage, wearable technologies, and biomedical applications. (2020-04-20)
In search of the Z boson
At the Japanese High-energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, in Tsukuba, about 50 kilometers north of Tokyo, the Belle II experiment has been in operation for about one year now. (2020-04-16)
Clemson scientist explores the colorful intricacies of pollen
A collaborative study by Clemson scientist Matthew Koski suggests that pollen color can evolve independently from flower traits, and that plant species maintain both light and dark pollen because each offers distinct survival advantages. (2020-04-16)
Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way help test dark matter theory
A research team led by physicists at the University of California, Riverside, reports tiny satellite galaxies of the Milky Way can be used to test fundamental properties of 'dark matter' -- nonluminous material thought to constitute 85% of matter in the universe. (2020-04-15)
Shedding light on dark traps
A multi-institutional collaboration, co-led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), has identified the source of efficiency-limiting defects in potential materials for next generation solar cells and LEDs. (2020-04-15)
Questionable stability of dissipative topological models for classical and quantum systems
In a new paper in EPJ D, Rebekka Koch from Amsterdam and Jan Carl Budich from Dresden analyse the spectral instability of energy-dissipative systems caused by their boundaries: A situation that is naturally given in experimental setups. (2020-04-15)
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