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Current Decision making News and Events, Decision making News Articles.
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New UTA study finds people tune out facts and trust their guts in medical emergencies
A study conducted by two associate professors of marketing at The University of Texas at Arlington shows that people are more likely to base decisions on anecdotal information instead of facts when they feel anxious and vulnerable. (2020-04-03)
Colorado study overturns 'snapshot' model of cell cycle in use since 1974
Live, single-cell imaging shows cellular 'memory' of growth factor availability throughout the cell cycle (and not just snapshot of growth factor availability) influences cells' decision to replicate. (2020-04-02)
Natural light flicker can help prevent detection
Movement breaks camouflage, making it risky for anything trying to hide. (2020-04-01)
Medical manufacturers with female directors act more quickly and frequently on recalls
Medical product companies, such as those that make pharmaceuticals and medical devices, make recall decisions quite differently as women are added to their board of directors, according to a new study by professors at four universities, including Indiana University. (2020-03-31)
Study helps to identify medications which are safe to use in treatment of COVID-19
A recent study has found that there is no evidence for or against the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen for patients with COVID-19. (2020-03-30)
Editorial calls for a precision medicine approach to follow-up of diverticulitis
An editorial challenges physicians and the US healthcare system to reconsider the current 'one size fits all' care for diverticulitis and to employ a precision medicine approach to determine which patients should be referred for colonoscopy. (2020-03-30)
A lifesaving reason to have more women on boards: ensuring consumer safety
In a study published online yesterday focused on the medical products industry -- which includes medical devices, pharmaceuticals and biologics -- a group of researchers found that, compared to firms with all-male boards, firms with female directors announced high-severity product recalls 28 days sooner. (2020-03-27)
Trauma relapse in a novel context may be preventable
Korea Brain Research Institute (KBRI, President: Pann-Ghill Suh) announced on February 10 that its research team led by Dr. (2020-03-18)
'Blind over-reliance' on AI technology to manage international migration could lead to serious breaches of human rights
Over-reliance by countries on artificial intelligence to tackle international migration and manage future migration crisis could lead to serious breaches of human rights, a new study warns. (2020-03-17)
Scientists can see the bias in your brain
The strength of alpha brain waves reveals if you are about to make a biased decision, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-03-16)
Aversion to risk by R&D managers may hurt US economic prospects
Research and Development (R&D) has long been key in the nation's economic prospects and according to new research from the University of California San Diego, the country's ability to maintain its competitive edge in this area largely depends on managers in R&D being less averse to risk. (2020-03-16)
Actively engaging local people could make grizzly conservation policies more bearable
Western Canada hosts a significant portion of North America's grizzly bears, and declining bear numbers have led to various conservation efforts. (2020-03-11)
Researchers create a new acoustic smart material inspired by shark skin
USC researchers created a new sharkskin-inspired smart material that allows shifts in acoustic transmission on demand using magnets. (2020-03-10)
Real-world evidence empowers personalized decisions about weight-loss surgery
The PCORnet Bariatric Study provides real-world evidence from analyses of tens of thousands of patient records that helps people considering weight-loss surgery to weigh the tradeoffs of the two main surgical procedures and make personalized decisions on which is best for them. (2020-03-04)
On eve of Super Tuesday, study sheds light on how people make choices
A new study taps into mathematics to probe how people make fraught choices, such as which candidate to vote for in an election. (2020-03-02)
Sugar gets the red light from consumers in new study
Researchers have found that sugar content is the most important factor for people when making healthy food choices -- overriding fat and salt. (2020-02-28)
How does the brain put decisions in context? Study finds unexpected brain region at work
When crossing the street, which way do you first turn your head to check for oncoming traffic? (2020-02-27)
Distrust of past experience may underlie obsessive-compulsive symptoms
People with higher obsessive-compulsive symptoms may place less trust in their past experience, leading to increased uncertainty, indecisiveness, and exploratory behaviors, according to new research presented in PLOS Computational Biology by Isaac Fradkin of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, and colleagues. (2020-02-27)
Study investigates moral distress of physicians who care for older adults
Researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine report that about four of 10 doctors caring for older adult patients who require a surrogate decision-maker experienced moral distress. (2020-02-25)
Desire for excitement fuels young offenders to commit crime, then skill takes over
Young burglars are driven by a desire for excitement when they initially commit crime, new research from the University of Portsmouth has found. (2020-02-25)
Cellular metabolism regulates the fate decision between pathogenic and regulatory T cells
Preclinical research shows a pivotal role for cellular metabolism to regulate the fate decision of naïve CD4 T cells as they differentiate into either destructive Th17 cells that mediate chronic inflammation or regulatory Treg T cells, a decision that occurs very early in the activation of CD4 T cells. (2020-02-25)
Why monkeys choose to drink alone
Why do some people almost always drop $10 in the Salvation Army bucket and others routinely walk by? (2020-02-24)
Experts map future of family caregiving research
A new supplemental issue of the journal The Gerontologist from The Gerontological Society of America shares 10 research priorities to better support the needs of family caregivers. (2020-02-23)
TMI: More information doesn't necessarily help people make better decisions
New research from Stevens Institute of Technology suggests that too much knowledge can lead people to make worse decisions, pointing to a critical gap in our understanding of how new information interacts with prior knowledge and beliefs. (2020-02-21)
New studies explore how knowledge drives action in climate change decision-making
In several new studies, University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researcher Katharine Mach and colleagues explore the importance of learning and knowledge in environmental decision-making and the different ways in which scientific knowledge can become more relevant and useful for societies. (2020-02-20)
Antidote to pain and negativity? Let it be
Merely a brief introduction to mindfulness helps people deal with physical pain and negative emotions, a new study by researchers at Yale, Columbia, and Dartmouth shows. (2020-02-19)
Receiving the news of Down syndrome in the era of prenatal testing
Most of the mothers of a child with Down Syndrome born in the Netherlands between 2010-16 have consciously chosen not to have prenatal testing. (2020-02-19)
Primary care patients assess econsult model for provider-to-specialist consultations
A study across five academic medical centers examined the reaction of patients to the use of an electronic consultation (eConsult) service for primary care provider-to-specialist consultation. (2020-02-18)
Feedback culture: When colleagues become competitors
Competitive behavior among employees may be triggered by the type of feedback they have received. (2020-02-15)
French unions played key role in protecting workers' mental health
Virginia Doellgast, associate professor of comparative employment relations in Cornell University's ILR School, examines the role unions played in the aftermath of those deaths. (2020-02-12)
Most men do not regret their choices for prostate cancer surgery
Men with localized prostate cancer are faced with deciding among a range of options for treatment - including a choice between robot-assisted versus conventional prostatectomy. (2020-02-10)
Neurobiological mechanisms involved in the loss of control in a study in mice revealed
The study conducted in rodents reveals a specific mechanism in this crucial cortical circuit for food addiction that involves a loss of control over intake. (2020-02-07)
Synthetic biology: Risk reduction, uncertainty and ethics
Joyce Tait, Founder and co-Director of the Innogen Institute -- a partnership with the University of Edinburgh and The Open University in the United Kingdom to speak during the AAAS 2020 session on 'Synthetic Biology: Digital Design of Living Systems.' She will explore the re-engineering of biological components through computational modelling and bio-systems design technologies and how they will require new frameworks for adaptive and responsible regulation. (2020-02-07)
Breathing may change your mind about free will
Is free will just an illusion? For decades, a signal from the brain called the 'readiness potential' has been interpreted to mean that free will may be an illusion. (2020-02-06)
A new learning model to enhance citizen participation
How to teach citizens to become active members of the society? (2020-02-06)
Autism screening rate soars with use of CHICA system developed by Regenstrief and IU
Universal early screening for autism is recommended for all children but is not routinely performed. (2020-02-05)
UT team develops model to predict hernia surgery recovery outcomes
Could patients experience less pain and possibly have better recovery outcomes if their fears or emotional issues were addressed before surgery? (2020-02-05)
Study paints picture of marijuana use in pregnant women
As marijuana is increasingly being legalized in US states, daily marijuana use among pregnant women is rising, despite evidence that this could harm their babies. (2020-02-04)
A never-before described natural process in soil can convert nitrogen gases into nitrates
This finding is important, not only because it involves a never-before described natural process, but also because the nitrogen in the soil is crucial for global sustainability, as it affects the productivity of the ecosystem and air quality for living organisms, including humans. (2020-02-04)
For complex decisions, narrow them down to two
When choosing between multiple alternatives, people usually focus their attention on the two most promising options. (2020-02-03)
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