Nav: Home

Current Decision making News and Events

Current Decision making News and Events, Decision making News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Analysis by surgical trainees examines recommendations for mastectomy across the UK
A woman's decision to undergo mastectomy for breast cancer relies on communication with her surgeon and, in addition, often draws on recommendations from a 'multidisciplinary team' (MDT) of doctors from different specialties such as oncology and radiology. (2019-11-06)
What we can learn from Indigenous land management
First Nations peoples' world view and connection to Country provide a rich source of knowledge and innovations for better land and water management policies when Indigenous decision-making is enacted, Australian researchers say. (2019-11-05)
First study of how family religious and spiritual beliefs influence end of life care
In the first study to investigate the association of the religious and spiritual beliefs of surrogate decision makers with the end of life decisions they make for incapacitated older adult family members, Regenstrief Institute Research Scientist Alexia Torke, M.D., and theological and scientific colleagues have found that the surrogate's belief in miracles was the main dimension linked to preferences for care of their loved one. (2019-11-04)
Published a clinical guide for the genomic diagnosis of Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Chronic Myelomonocytic leukaemia
A collective work between researchers from 8 research centres and hospitals in Spain, coordinated by Francesc Solé of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute (IJC), and Esperanza Such, of the University and Polytechnic Hospital de la Fe describes the recommendations of use of the Next Generation genome Sequencing (NGS) in the diagnosis of Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML). (2019-11-04)
Ramping up to divide: An unstable protein is the master switch for cell division
An extremely unstable protein, Cln3, appears to be the master switch that activates cell division in budding yeast. (2019-11-04)
The financial benefits of being bilingual
A new study shows that thinking in a foreign language may help people be more objective when deciding on a price to sell an item. (2019-10-30)
Coordinated brain activation supports spatial learning and decision-making
Specialized brain activation 'replays' the possible routes that rats can take as they navigate a space, helping them keep track of the paths they've already taken and choose among the routes that they can take next, according to a National Institutes of Health-funded study published in the journal Neuron. (2019-10-30)
Study considers double-edged sword of trust in regulatory agencies' monitoring of firms
New research based on observations of auditors suggests that strong relationships and trust between auditing agencies and firms can reduce monitoring failures, such as unintended mistakes, to a point, but can also eventually lead to negligence and collusion. (2019-10-30)
Financial incentives plus information decrease patient preference for diagnostic testing
Providing financial incentives to forego testing significantly decreases patient preference for testing, even when accounting for test benefit and risk. (2019-10-28)
Integrated solutions for the Indus Basin
New framework helps decision makers find science-based pathways to address water resources and connected sustainability challenges in the Indus River basin. (2019-10-25)
Study shows shoppers reject offers made under time pressure
Giving consumers short time limits on offers means they are less likely to take them up, according to new research. (2019-10-24)
Prisoner's dilemma game reveals cooperation leads to leadership
Game theory has historically studied cooperation and hierarchy, and has sought to explain why individuals cooperate, even though they might be better off not to do so. (2019-10-23)
Simple conversations can reduce opioid prescriptions after hysterectomy
Women who undergo a hysterectomy are often prescribed at least twice as many opioids as they use - but there may be a simple way to change that. (2019-10-22)
Are we underestimating the benefits of investing in renewable energy?
Scientists have estimated the emissions intensity of carbon dioxide and other air pollutants from a major electricity distributor and highlighted key consequences - essential information for policymakers shaping decisions to reduce electricity system emissions. (2019-10-16)
Achieving a safe and just future for the ocean economy
much attention has been given to the growth of the 'Blue Economy' -- a term which refers to the sustainable use of ocean and marine resources for economic growth, jobs, and improved livelihoods. (2019-10-15)
Startled fish escape using several distinct neuronal circuits
A fast knee-jerk 'ballistic' escape response and a more considered 'delayed' escape response are mediated by distinct and parallel neuronal pathways in zebrafish, according to a study published October 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Harold Burgess of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and colleagues. (2019-10-15)
UBC study finds siblings of problem gamblers also impulsive, prone to risk-taking
Biological siblings of people with gambling disorder also display markers of increased impulsivity and risk-taking, according to a new UBC psychology study. (2019-10-09)
New addiction treatments hold promise for stemming the opioid crisis, scientists say
Concerns over the opioid epidemic have sparked a strong scientific interest in why some people become addicted while others don't. (2019-10-08)
A Canadian essential medicines list must be evidence-based
An essential medicines list in Canada should be evidence-based and independent of conflicting interests, found a study of decision-makers and policy-makers that is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-10-07)
Different views on vaginal birth after previous caesarean section (VBAC)
There is considerable variations in different countries´ health care systems and professionals in the views on vaginal birth after previous caesarean section (VBAC), according to a European study. (2019-10-03)
Can excessive athletic training make your brain tired? New study says yes
You'd expect excessive athletic training to make the body tired, but can it make the brain tired too? (2019-09-26)
Sport has its benefits but do not overdo it
In top athletes, excess physical activity can be harmful, as cases of 'overtraining syndrome' suggest. (2019-09-26)
Tripolye 'mega-structures' were ancient community centers
So-called 'mega-structures' in ancient Europe were public buildings that likely served a variety of economic and political purposes, according to a study released Sept. (2019-09-25)
Mice, like humans, fidget when deep in thought
By measuring the brain activity of mice during decision making, neuroscientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory observed that like humans, mice also seemed to fidget, or make uninstructed movements unrelated to the trained task. (2019-09-24)
Commit a crime? Loved ones got your back
Reading about a child abuse case or someone burglarizing homes often stirs feelings of disgust, anger and disbelief when it's learned the perpetrator's family or friends did nothing to stop it or report it to police. (2019-09-24)
More operations are scheduled if doctor is well rested
Researchers at Linköping University have investigated how orthopaedic surgeons make decisions regarding surgery, and how the decisions are related to how much of their work shift they have completed. (2019-09-18)
Want to optimize sales performance?
CATONSVILLE, MD, September 16, 2019- According to new research published in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science, companies can improve sales performance when they adjust sales commissions for the sale of more popular items. (2019-09-18)
Don't make major decisions on an empty stomach, research suggests
A new study from the University of Dundee suggests that people might want to avoid making any important decisions about the future on an empty stomach. (2019-09-16)
Social isolation derails brain development in mice
Female mice housed alone during adolescence show atypical development of the prefrontal cortex and resort to habitual behavior in adulthood, according to new research published in eNeuro. (2019-09-16)
Study finds certain drugs used to treat eye diseases excreted into human breast milk
Ranibizumab and aflibercept are medications used to treat several retinal diseases. (2019-09-13)
Heterogeneity in the workplace: 'Diversity is very important to us -- but not in my team'
Diversity in the workplace is highly sought in theory, but often still lacking in practice. (2019-09-12)
Brain: How to optimize decision making?
Our brains are constantly faced with different choices. Why is it so difficult to make up our mind when faced with two or more choices? (2019-09-11)
How we make decisions depends on how uncertain we are
A new Dartmouth study on how we use reward information for making choices shows how humans and monkeys adopt their decision-making strategies depending on the uncertainty of information present. (2019-09-09)
'Information gerrymandering' poses a threat to democratic decision making, both online and off
Concern over fake news and online trolls is widespread and warranted, but researchers led by the University of Pennsylvania's Joshua Plotkin and the University of Houston's Alexander Stewart have identified another impediment to the free flow of information in social networks. (2019-09-04)
How do social networks shape political decision-making?
New research shows that social media's influence on voting goes beyond bots and foreign interference. (2019-09-04)
Many who die waiting for a kidney had multiple offers, new study finds
Most patients who died or were removed from the kidney transplant waitlist before getting a transplant received multiple offers for a donor kidney. (2019-08-30)
Providing more testing choices does not increase colorectal cancer screening rates
A study showed that choice between screening methods alone does not impact colorectal cancer screening rates, but how options are presented can alter patient decision-making. (2019-08-30)
Deep snow cover in the Arctic region intensifies heat waves in Eurasia
Variations in the depth of snow cover in the Arctic region from late winter to spring determines the summer temperature pattern in Eurasia, according to Hokkaido University researchers. (2019-08-30)
Warnings on individual cigarettes could reduce smoking
Health warnings printed on individual cigarettes could play a key role in reducing smoking, according to new research from the University of Stirling. (2019-08-29)
Friendships factor into start-up success (and failure)
New research co-authored by Cass Business School academics has found entrepreneurial groups with strong friendship bonds are more likely to persist with a failing venture and escalate financial commitment to it. (2019-08-29)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.