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Current Decision making News and Events

Current Decision making News and Events, Decision making News Articles.
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Don't make major decisions on an empty stomach, research suggests
A new study from the University of Dundee suggests that people might want to avoid making any important decisions about the future on an empty stomach. (2019-09-16)
Social isolation derails brain development in mice
Female mice housed alone during adolescence show atypical development of the prefrontal cortex and resort to habitual behavior in adulthood, according to new research published in eNeuro. (2019-09-16)
Study finds certain drugs used to treat eye diseases excreted into human breast milk
Ranibizumab and aflibercept are medications used to treat several retinal diseases. (2019-09-13)
Heterogeneity in the workplace: 'Diversity is very important to us -- but not in my team'
Diversity in the workplace is highly sought in theory, but often still lacking in practice. (2019-09-12)
Brain: How to optimize decision making?
Our brains are constantly faced with different choices. Why is it so difficult to make up our mind when faced with two or more choices? (2019-09-11)
How we make decisions depends on how uncertain we are
A new Dartmouth study on how we use reward information for making choices shows how humans and monkeys adopt their decision-making strategies depending on the uncertainty of information present. (2019-09-09)
'Information gerrymandering' poses a threat to democratic decision making, both online and off
Concern over fake news and online trolls is widespread and warranted, but researchers led by the University of Pennsylvania's Joshua Plotkin and the University of Houston's Alexander Stewart have identified another impediment to the free flow of information in social networks. (2019-09-04)
How do social networks shape political decision-making?
New research shows that social media's influence on voting goes beyond bots and foreign interference. (2019-09-04)
Many who die waiting for a kidney had multiple offers, new study finds
Most patients who died or were removed from the kidney transplant waitlist before getting a transplant received multiple offers for a donor kidney. (2019-08-30)
Providing more testing choices does not increase colorectal cancer screening rates
A study showed that choice between screening methods alone does not impact colorectal cancer screening rates, but how options are presented can alter patient decision-making. (2019-08-30)
Deep snow cover in the Arctic region intensifies heat waves in Eurasia
Variations in the depth of snow cover in the Arctic region from late winter to spring determines the summer temperature pattern in Eurasia, according to Hokkaido University researchers. (2019-08-30)
Warnings on individual cigarettes could reduce smoking
Health warnings printed on individual cigarettes could play a key role in reducing smoking, according to new research from the University of Stirling. (2019-08-29)
Friendships factor into start-up success (and failure)
New research co-authored by Cass Business School academics has found entrepreneurial groups with strong friendship bonds are more likely to persist with a failing venture and escalate financial commitment to it. (2019-08-29)
Some vaccine doubters may be swayed by proximity to disease outbreak, study finds
An individual's trust in institutions such as the CDC, and how close they live to a recent measles outbreak, may affect their attitudes on measles vaccination, according to a study published Aug. (2019-08-28)
Study finds many psychiatric disorders have heightened impulsivity
The study analyzed data from studies across eight different psychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, schizophrenia, eating disorders, and others. (2019-08-28)
Smarter experiments for faster materials discovery
A team of scientists from the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory designed, created, and successfully tested a new algorithm to make smarter scientific measurement decisions. (2019-08-28)
Pregnant women of color experience disempowerment by health care providers
A new study finds that women of color perceive their interactions with doctors, nurses and midwives as being misleading, with information being 'packaged' in such a way as to disempower them by limiting maternity healthcare choices for themselves and their children. (2019-08-27)
Spontaneous brain fluctuations influence risk-taking
Minute-to-minute fluctuations in human brain activity, linked to changing levels of dopamine, impact whether we make risky decisions, finds a new UCL study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2019-08-26)
Hiring committees that don't believe in gender bias promote fewer women
Is gender bias in hiring really a thing? Opinions vary, but a new study by a UBC psychologist and researchers in France reveals that hiring committees who denied it's a problem were less likely to promote women. (2019-08-26)
Uncertainty in emissions estimates in the spotlight
National or other emissions inventories of greenhouse gases that are used to develop strategies and track progress in terms of emissions reductions for climate mitigation contain a certain amount of uncertainty, which inevitably has an impact on the decisions they inform. (2019-08-19)
Epicardial coronary artery abnormalities that do not result in myocardial ischemia
What to Do with Epicardial Coronary Artery Abnormalities That do not Result in Myocardial Ischemia? (2019-08-15)
Care less with helmet
A bike helmet suggests safety -- even if the wearer is not sitting on a bike and the helmet cannot fulfil its function. (2019-08-15)
Early education setback for summer premature births
Children born as little as three weeks premature, who consequently fall into an earlier school year are more likely to experience significant setbacks in their education after their first year of school, according to new research published today in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2019-08-13)
Individuals are swayed by their peers, leading to more severe punishments, study finds
When acting as one part of a group charged with deciding how to punish someone -- a jury, for example -- individuals are swayed by their peers to punish more often than they would if deciding alone, a new study found. (2019-08-12)
New study: Ocean temperature 'surprises' becoming more common
Around the world, periods of rapid ocean warming are happening more often than we thought. (2019-08-05)
Mapping cells in the 'immortal' regenerating hydra
The tiny hydra, a freshwater invertebrate related to jellyfish and corals, has an amazing ability to renew its cells and regenerate damaged tissue. (2019-07-25)
Physician experience and practice area affects decision-making for endovascular treatment
A new study presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 16th Annual Meeting found significant differences in decision-making for endovascular treatment (EVT) when the physician's experience with EVT use and practice area were taken into consideration. (2019-07-24)
How random tweaks in timing can lead to new game theory strategies
Most game theory models don't reflect the relentlessly random timing of the real world. (2019-07-24)
How do brains remember decisions?
Mammal brains -- including those of humans -- store and recall impressive amounts of information based on our good and bad decisions and interactions in an ever-changing world. (2019-07-23)
Survival of the zebrafish: Mate, or flee?
*Researchers have found that when making decisions that are important to the species' survival, zebrafish choose to mate rather than to flee from a threat. (2019-07-18)
Timing of spay, neuter tied to higher risk of obesity and orthopedic injuries in dogs
Spaying or neutering large-breed dogs can put them at a higher risk for obesity and, if done when the dog is young, nontraumatic orthopedic injuries, reports a new study based on data from the Morris Animal Foundation Golden Retriever Lifetime Study. (2019-07-17)
Companies' political leanings influence engagement with activists
Liberal-leaning companies are more likely to work in concert with the demands of activists of all kinds than conservative-leaning companies, according to researchers at Penn State and the University of Washington. (2019-07-16)
Adults with HIV who have compassionate care providers start and remain in treatment longer
Rutgers researchers find patients who perceive their primary care providers as lacking empathy and not willing to include them in decision making are at risk for abandoning treatment or not seeking treatment at all. (2019-07-14)
More support needed for young carers of parents with mental illness
New research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) says there is a 'clear need' for more support for young carers of parents with a mental illness as they move into adulthood. (2019-07-11)
Area of brain linked to spatial awareness and planning also plays role in decision making
New research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows that the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), an area of the brain often associated with planning movements and spatial awareness, also plays a crucial role in making decisions about images in the field of view. (2019-07-11)
A new approach to primary care: Advanced team care with in-room support
In this special report, the authors argue that the current primary care team paradigm is underpowered, in that most of the administrative responsibility still falls mainly on the physician. (2019-07-10)
IOF review of impact of drug holidays on bone health
The impact of interruption of anti-osteoporosis treatment in patients on therapy with bisphosphonates or denosumab is reviewed in a new IOF Working Group paper. (2019-07-08)
Social context influences decision-makers' willingness to take risks
Do differences in performance have an impact on the appetite for risk-taking in decision-makers? (2019-07-03)
How the brain helps us make good decisions -- and bad ones
A prevailing theory in neuroscience holds that people make decisions based on integrated global calculations that occur within the frontal cortex of the brain. (2019-06-25)
Neural networks taught to recognize similar objects on videos without accuracy degradation
Andrey Savchenko, Professor at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University), has developed a method that can help to enhance image identification on videos. (2019-06-21)
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