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Insurance linked to hospitals' decision to transfer kids with mental health emergencies
A national study by UC Davis Health researchers finds differences in the decisions to admit or transfer children with mental health emergencies based on the patients' insurance type. (2019-07-16)
Area of brain linked to spatial awareness and planning also plays role in decision making
New research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows that the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), an area of the brain often associated with planning movements and spatial awareness, also plays a crucial role in making decisions about images in the field of view. (2019-07-11)
Parents who help unemployed adult children curb behavior to offset costs
Parents who financially help their unemployed adult children offset such costs by adjusting their behavior, particularly by spending less money on food, working more and reducing retirement savings, according to a new RAND Corporation study. (2019-07-09)
Location-based data can provide insights for business decisions
Data from social commerce websites can provide essential information to business owners before they make decisions that could determine whether a new venture succeeds or fails. (2019-07-01)
Viewing pornography increase unethical behavior at work
New research discovers employees who view pornography aren't just costing companies millions of dollars in wasted time, they're causing harm to the company. (2019-06-25)
How the brain helps us make good decisions -- and bad ones
A prevailing theory in neuroscience holds that people make decisions based on integrated global calculations that occur within the frontal cortex of the brain. (2019-06-25)
Why money cannot 'buy' housework
If a man is handy with the vacuum cleaner, isn't averse to rustling up a lush family meal most nights after he's put on the washing machine having popped into the supermarket on his way home then it's more than likely his partner will have her own bank account. (2019-06-24)
Neural networks taught to recognize similar objects on videos without accuracy degradation
Andrey Savchenko, Professor at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University), has developed a method that can help to enhance image identification on videos. (2019-06-21)
Democrats and Republicans agree: Take politics out of health policymaking
It's no secret that Americans are politically divided, but a new report offers hope that Democrats and Republicans find common ground on at least one issue: the role of 'evidence' in developing and shaping health laws. (2019-06-18)
What influences critical care doctors in withdrawing life support for patients with brain injury?
Decisions to withdraw life support treatments in critically ill patients with severe brain injury are complicated, are based on many factors, and are usually made by critical care physicians and families in the intensive care unit. (2019-06-17)
Can computers make decisions like humans? A new study may have the answer
A team of British researchers has developed a method that enables computers to make decisions in a way that is more similar to humans. (2019-06-03)
'Mindreading' neurons capable of having expectations about the behavior of the others
Psychologists and philosophers had long suggested that simulation is the mechanism whereby humans understand the minds of others. (2019-05-28)
Bad marketing encourages consumers to opt for lower quality products
A new framework to enable retailers to better position their products to consumers has been devised by Tamer Boyaci and Frank Huettner at ESMT Berlin together with Yalcin Akcay from Melbourne Business School. (2019-05-21)
How we make complex decisions
MIT neuroscientists have identified a brain circuit that helps break complex decisions down into smaller pieces. (2019-05-16)
Opposites attract and, together, they can make surprisingly gratifying decisions
Little is known about how consumers make decisions together. A new study by researchers from Boston College, Georgia Tech and Washington State University finds pairs with opposing interpersonal orientations -- the selfish versus the altruistic -- can reach amicable decisions about what to watch on TV, or where to eat, for example. (2019-05-09)
Scientists locate brain area where value decisions are made
Neurobiologists at UC San Diego have pinpointed the brain area responsible for value decisions that are made based on past experiences. (2019-05-09)
Complex geology contributed to Deepwater Horizon disaster, new study finds
A study from The University of Texas at Austin is the first published in a scientific journal to take an in-depth look at the challenging geologic conditions faced by the crew of the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig and the role those conditions played in the 2010 disaster. (2019-05-07)
Rethinking digital service design could reduce their environmental impact
Rethinking digital service design could reduce their environmental impact Digital technology companies could reduce the carbon footprint of services like YouTube by changing how they are designed, experts say. (2019-05-06)
Majority of US states restrict decision-making for incapacitated pregnant women
Half of all US states have laws on the books that invalidate a pregnant woman's advance directive if she becomes incapacitated, and a majority of states don't disclose these restrictions in advance directive forms, according to a study by physicians and bioethicists at Mayo Clinic and other institutions. (2019-04-23)
Could computer games help farmers adapt to climate change?
Researchers from Sweden and Finland have developed the interactive web-based Maladaptation Game, which can be used to better understand how Nordic farmers make decisions regarding environmental changes and how they negotiate the negative impacts of potentially damaging decisions. (2019-04-18)
How do we make moral decisions?
When it comes to making moral decisions, we often think of the golden rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you. (2019-04-18)
When it comes to learning, what's better: The carrot or the stick?
Does the potential to win or lose money influence the confidence one has in one's own decisions? (2019-04-16)
Men's knowledge on prostate cancer needs improving
UBC researchers have determined the majority of men struggle when it comes to understanding the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. (2019-04-16)
Leveraging scientists' perceptions for successful interactions with policy makers
Creating new policies that deal with important issues like climate change requires input from geoscientists. (2019-04-15)
'Mindreading' neurons simulate decisions of social partners
Scientists have identified special types of brain cells that may allow us to simulate the decision-making processes of others, thereby reconstructing their state of mind and predicting their intentions. (2019-04-11)
UTSA researcher studies bias in prosecutor filing trends
UTSA Criminal Justice professors Richard Hartley and Rob Tillyer have studied the factors affecting whether prosecutors decline to charge someone arrested for a federal crime. (2019-04-01)
For some people, attractive wives and high status husbands enhance marital quality
Researchers from Florida State University found that maximizing men -- those who seek to make the 'best' choice -- who had attractive wives were more satisfied at the start of their marriages than maximizing men who had less attractive wives, and maximizing women who had high status husbands experienced less steep declines in satisfaction over time than maximizing women who had low status husbands. (2019-03-28)
Negative emotions can reduce our capacity to trust
It is no secret that a bad mood can negatively affect how we treat others. (2019-03-14)
It's not your fault -- Your brain is self-centered
You're in the middle of a conversation and suddenly turn away because you heard your name. (2019-03-13)
Are eyes the window to our mistakes?
When humans make certain types of mistakes, the size of their pupils change. (2019-03-11)
Money-savers focus attention -- and eyes -- on the prize
Why can some people patiently save for the future, while others opt for fewer dollars now? (2019-02-25)
Believing in yourself can backfire when investing in equity crowdfunded ventures
Normally, it's good to believe in yourself. But research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business indicates that it can be bad advice for amateurs investing online in unregulated, sometimes risky, equity crowdfunded ventures. (2019-02-21)
Tools to help seriously ill patients near death make decisions about their care aren't commonly used in routine practice
Many seriously ill people in the United States -- and around the world -- are not dying as they would like. (2019-02-20)
Visualizing mental valuation processes
Rafael Polanía and his team of ETH researchers have developed a computer model capable of predicting certain human decisions. (2019-02-19)
Parents: Keep medical marijuana dispensaries away from children
Seven in 10 parents think they should have a say in whether dispensaries are located near their child's school or daycare and most say they should be banned within a certain distance of those facilities. (2019-02-18)
To tool or not to tool?
Flexible tool use is closely associated to higher mental processes such as the ability to plan actions. (2019-02-14)
Blockchain can strengthen the credibility of meta-analyses
Blockchain -- the technology behind the secure transactions of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin -- can make it easier for researchers to conduct transparent meta-analyses in social science research where reproducibility is a growing concern. (2019-02-14)
Some primary care doctors not prepared to help with cancer treatment decisions
Research has shown patients are discussing initial cancer treatment options with their primary care doctors. (2019-02-12)
Why forgetting at work can be a good thing
Psychologists and information scientists at the University of Münster have looked at how digital information systems support daily work and why it can be a good for us to forget certain things. (2019-02-07)
Do cold temperatures result in heat-of-the-moment purchases?
In 2005, the New York Times reported that high end retailer Bergdorf Goodman kept its stores chilled to 68.3 degrees, whereas Old Navy's was kept at a balmy 80.3. (2019-02-07)
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