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Blood test may point to patients at higher risk for COVID-19 deterioration, death
George Washington University researchers found five biomarkers associated with higher odds of clinical deterioration and death in COVID-19 patients. (2020-08-06)
New risk tool developed for cardiac arrest patients
Experts have developed a risk score to predict cardiac arrest patient outcomes. (2020-07-30)
AJTMH July updates
Below is an update of COVID-19 articles published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (AJTMH). (2020-07-22)
Spider monkey groups as collective computers
New research shows that spider monkeys use collective computation to figure out the best way to find food. (2020-07-21)
Ethical recommendations for triage of COVID-19 patients
An international expert group led by Mathias Wirth, Professor of Systematic Theology and Ethics at the University of Bern, has developed recommendations for avoiding triage of COVID-19 patients in extreme situations. (2020-07-16)
Time to get real on the power of positive thinking -- new study
Positive thinking has long been extolled as the route to happiness, but it might be time to ditch the self-help books after a new study shows that realists enjoy a greater sense of long-term wellbeing than optimists. (2020-07-06)
Decide now or wait for something better?
When we make decisions, we don't always have all options available to choose from at the same time. (2020-06-18)
Improving the operation and performance of Wi-Fi networks for the 5G/6G ecosystem
An article published in the advanced online edition of the journal Computer Communications shows that the use of machine learning can improve the operation and performance of the Wi-Fi networks of the future, those of the 5G/6G ecosystem. (2020-06-11)
Age affects decisions related to breast cancer surgery
A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study indicates that breast cancer surgery is safe for patients who are older than 70 years of age, but age can influence the decision to undergo surgery. (2020-06-03)
Study finds people are more satisfied after quitting the status quo
A new paper in The Review of Economic Studies, published by Oxford University Press, finds that people who use a coin toss to decide on an important change are more likely to follow through with that decision, are more satisfied with that decision, and report a higher overall happiness after a six-month period. (2020-05-18)
New Chicago Booth research suggests patients prefer expert guidance for medical decisions
New research from University of Chicago Booth School of Business suggests that in times of uncertainty, people want expert guidance when making choices about their medical care. (2020-05-14)
New UTA study finds people tune out facts and trust their guts in medical emergencies
A study conducted by two associate professors of marketing at The University of Texas at Arlington shows that people are more likely to base decisions on anecdotal information instead of facts when they feel anxious and vulnerable. (2020-04-03)
Medical manufacturers with female directors act more quickly and frequently on recalls
Medical product companies, such as those that make pharmaceuticals and medical devices, make recall decisions quite differently as women are added to their board of directors, according to a new study by professors at four universities, including Indiana University. (2020-03-31)
Female directors are quicker to recall dangerous medical products, study shows
Some 4,500 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs and devices are pulled from shelves annually -- decisions greatly influenced by the presence of women on a firm's board, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. (2020-03-30)
The desire for information: Blissful ignorance or painful truth?
A new study looks closely at why many people are so likely to avoid useful information -- even if it benefits their health. (2020-03-30)
TMI: More information doesn't necessarily help people make better decisions
New research from Stevens Institute of Technology suggests that too much knowledge can lead people to make worse decisions, pointing to a critical gap in our understanding of how new information interacts with prior knowledge and beliefs. (2020-02-21)
Autism eye scan could lead to early detection
A new eye scan could help identify autism in children years earlier than currently possible. (2020-02-20)
For complex decisions, narrow them down to two
When choosing between multiple alternatives, people usually focus their attention on the two most promising options. (2020-02-03)
AI to help monitor behavior
Algorithms based on artificial intelligence do better at supporting educational and clinical decision-making, according to a new study. (2020-01-27)
Local activism can't be crushed, research finds. At most, it changes target
According to received wisdom, local activism against the establishment of industrial plants follows a cycle, with its highest intensity a short time after mobilization. (2020-01-16)
How decisions unfold in a zebrafish brain
Researchers were able to track the activity of each neuron in the entire brain of zebrafish larvae and reconstruct the unfolding of neuronal events as the animals repeatedly made 'left or right' choices in a behavioral experiment. (2020-01-16)
Which is more effective for treating PTSD: Medication, or psychotherapy?
A systematic review and meta-analysis led by Jeffrey Sonis, MD, MPH, of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, finds there is insufficient evidence at present to answer that question. (2019-12-19)
A person's perception of risk can tell us about their chances of opioid relapse
People in treatment for opioid addiction are more likely to relapse when they become more tolerant of risks, according to a study by Rutgers and other institutions. (2019-12-08)
New modeling will shed light on policy decisions' effect on migration from sea level rise
A new modeling approach can help researchers, policymakers and the public better understand how policy decisions will influence human migration as sea levels rise around the globe. (2019-11-26)
Cybershoppers make better buying decisions on PCs than phones -- Ben-Gurion U. researchers
This is the first study that differentiates between screen size and information reduction, which are often mixed up. (2019-11-21)
Best of the best: Who makes the most accurate decisions in expert groups?
New method predicts accuracy on the basis of similarity. (2019-11-20)
Study offers first large-sample evidence of the effect of ethics training on financial sector
New research from Notre Dame offers the first large-sample study on how rules and ethics training affects behavior and employment decisions in the financial sector. (2019-11-20)
Engineers help with water under the bridge and other tough environmental decisions
From energy to water to food, civil engineering projects greatly impact natural resources. (2019-11-12)
When managing a company, less is more
New branding research from Michigan State University offers strategies for companies to increase market share -- revealing who's doing it right and who needs to make a change. (2019-11-05)
First study of how family religious and spiritual beliefs influence end of life care
In the first study to investigate the association of the religious and spiritual beliefs of surrogate decision makers with the end of life decisions they make for incapacitated older adult family members, Regenstrief Institute Research Scientist Alexia Torke, M.D., and theological and scientific colleagues have found that the surrogate's belief in miracles was the main dimension linked to preferences for care of their loved one. (2019-11-04)
The financial benefits of being bilingual
A new study shows that thinking in a foreign language may help people be more objective when deciding on a price to sell an item. (2019-10-30)
Study shows shoppers reject offers made under time pressure
Giving consumers short time limits on offers means they are less likely to take them up, according to new research. (2019-10-24)
New framework makes AI systems more transparent without sacrificing performance
Researchers are proposing a framework that would allow users to understand the rationale behind artificial intelligence (AI) decisions. (2019-10-21)
Family members' emotional attachment limits family firm growth
New research led by Lancaster University Management School's Centre for Family Business shows family-related considerations often trump a desire to grow and expand in family firms. (2019-10-16)
Estimating calorie content not clear-cut for all -- Otago study
We make food decisions several times a day - from what time we eat to how much - but a new University of Otago, New Zealand, study has found we are not very good at judging the energy-density of what we consume. (2019-10-01)
More operations are scheduled if doctor is well rested
Researchers at Linköping University have investigated how orthopaedic surgeons make decisions regarding surgery, and how the decisions are related to how much of their work shift they have completed. (2019-09-18)
HTA in the European network: Osteoporosis screening without proof of benefit
For the first time, IQWiG was in charge of a health technology assessment for the European network EUnetHTA. (2019-09-17)
Don't make major decisions on an empty stomach, research suggests
A new study from the University of Dundee suggests that people might want to avoid making any important decisions about the future on an empty stomach. (2019-09-16)
'Soft tactile logic' tech distributes decision-making throughout stretchable material
Inspired by octopuses, researchers have developed a structure that senses, computes and responds without any centralized processing -- creating a device that is not quite a robot and not quite a computer, but has characteristics of both. (2019-09-13)
Expert feedback improves antibiotic prescribing decisions in paediatrics
In an experimental study, economists and medical experts tested how expert feedback will affect the antibiotic prescribing behaviour of paediatricians. (2019-09-12)
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