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Engineers help with water under the bridge and other tough environmental decisions
From energy to water to food, civil engineering projects greatly impact natural resources. (2019-11-12)
When managing a company, less is more
New branding research from Michigan State University offers strategies for companies to increase market share -- revealing who's doing it right and who needs to make a change. (2019-11-05)
First study of how family religious and spiritual beliefs influence end of life care
In the first study to investigate the association of the religious and spiritual beliefs of surrogate decision makers with the end of life decisions they make for incapacitated older adult family members, Regenstrief Institute Research Scientist Alexia Torke, M.D., and theological and scientific colleagues have found that the surrogate's belief in miracles was the main dimension linked to preferences for care of their loved one. (2019-11-04)
The financial benefits of being bilingual
A new study shows that thinking in a foreign language may help people be more objective when deciding on a price to sell an item. (2019-10-30)
Study shows shoppers reject offers made under time pressure
Giving consumers short time limits on offers means they are less likely to take them up, according to new research. (2019-10-24)
New framework makes AI systems more transparent without sacrificing performance
Researchers are proposing a framework that would allow users to understand the rationale behind artificial intelligence (AI) decisions. (2019-10-21)
Family members' emotional attachment limits family firm growth
New research led by Lancaster University Management School's Centre for Family Business shows family-related considerations often trump a desire to grow and expand in family firms. (2019-10-16)
Estimating calorie content not clear-cut for all -- Otago study
We make food decisions several times a day - from what time we eat to how much - but a new University of Otago, New Zealand, study has found we are not very good at judging the energy-density of what we consume. (2019-10-01)
More operations are scheduled if doctor is well rested
Researchers at Linköping University have investigated how orthopaedic surgeons make decisions regarding surgery, and how the decisions are related to how much of their work shift they have completed. (2019-09-18)
HTA in the European network: Osteoporosis screening without proof of benefit
For the first time, IQWiG was in charge of a health technology assessment for the European network EUnetHTA. (2019-09-17)
Don't make major decisions on an empty stomach, research suggests
A new study from the University of Dundee suggests that people might want to avoid making any important decisions about the future on an empty stomach. (2019-09-16)
'Soft tactile logic' tech distributes decision-making throughout stretchable material
Inspired by octopuses, researchers have developed a structure that senses, computes and responds without any centralized processing -- creating a device that is not quite a robot and not quite a computer, but has characteristics of both. (2019-09-13)
Expert feedback improves antibiotic prescribing decisions in paediatrics
In an experimental study, economists and medical experts tested how expert feedback will affect the antibiotic prescribing behaviour of paediatricians. (2019-09-12)
Heterogeneity in the workplace: 'Diversity is very important to us -- but not in my team'
Diversity in the workplace is highly sought in theory, but often still lacking in practice. (2019-09-12)
Shoppers more likely to pay for upgrades when extra cost is an 'add-on,' study finds
Shoppers are up to one-third more likely to shell out for the premium option when the extra cost is expressed as an add-on, as opposed to a higher overall price, according to new research from the UBC Sauder School of Business. (2019-09-11)
Brain: How to optimize decision making?
Our brains are constantly faced with different choices. Why is it so difficult to make up our mind when faced with two or more choices? (2019-09-11)
Study: Action-oriented goals produce higher probability of purchases under tight deadlines
People on a tight deadline have stronger intentions to enact behaviors -- whether it's redeeming a coupon or following through on receiving a flu shot -- immediately after moving than after sitting, says research co-written by U. of. (2019-09-09)
Global study reveals most popular marketing metrics
Satisfaction is the most popular metric for marketing decisions around the world, according to a new study from the University of Technology Sydney. (2019-08-28)
Hiring committees that don't believe in gender bias promote fewer women
Is gender bias in hiring really a thing? Opinions vary, but a new study by a UBC psychologist and researchers in France reveals that hiring committees who denied it's a problem were less likely to promote women. (2019-08-26)
What's more powerful, word-of-mouth or following someone else's lead?
Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, UCLA and the University of Texas published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science, that reveals the power of word-of-mouth in social learning, even when compared to the power of following the example of someone we trust or admire. (2019-08-13)
Individuals are swayed by their peers, leading to more severe punishments, study finds
When acting as one part of a group charged with deciding how to punish someone -- a jury, for example -- individuals are swayed by their peers to punish more often than they would if deciding alone, a new study found. (2019-08-12)
Building the future of federal science
The work of federal scientists is essential to support the health, security, and well-being of people in Canada, from exploring the high Arctic, to safeguarding the effective and ethical use of AI, to ensuring the food that ends up on our dinner plates is safe to eat. (2019-08-08)
New study: Ocean temperature 'surprises' becoming more common
Around the world, periods of rapid ocean warming are happening more often than we thought. (2019-08-05)
Very little public support for relaxing rules and regulations around fracking
A major new public attitudes survey on fracking reveals very little public support for relaxing the rules and regulations around fracking -- a key demand of major shale gas extraction companies. (2019-08-01)
Overturning the truth on conservation tillage
Conservation tillage does not lower yield in modern cropping systems. (2019-07-31)
Conservation or construction? Deciding waterbird hotspots
MSU scientists show that conservation and construction decisions should rely on multiple approaches to determine waterbird 'hotspots,' not just on one analysis method as is often done. (2019-07-30)
Physician experience and practice area affects decision-making for endovascular treatment
A new study presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 16th Annual Meeting found significant differences in decision-making for endovascular treatment (EVT) when the physician's experience with EVT use and practice area were taken into consideration. (2019-07-24)
Survival of the zebrafish: Mate, or flee?
*Researchers have found that when making decisions that are important to the species' survival, zebrafish choose to mate rather than to flee from a threat. (2019-07-18)
Insurance linked to hospitals' decision to transfer kids with mental health emergencies
A national study by UC Davis Health researchers finds differences in the decisions to admit or transfer children with mental health emergencies based on the patients' insurance type. (2019-07-16)
Area of brain linked to spatial awareness and planning also plays role in decision making
New research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows that the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), an area of the brain often associated with planning movements and spatial awareness, also plays a crucial role in making decisions about images in the field of view. (2019-07-11)
Parents who help unemployed adult children curb behavior to offset costs
Parents who financially help their unemployed adult children offset such costs by adjusting their behavior, particularly by spending less money on food, working more and reducing retirement savings, according to a new RAND Corporation study. (2019-07-09)
Location-based data can provide insights for business decisions
Data from social commerce websites can provide essential information to business owners before they make decisions that could determine whether a new venture succeeds or fails. (2019-07-01)
Viewing pornography increase unethical behavior at work
New research discovers employees who view pornography aren't just costing companies millions of dollars in wasted time, they're causing harm to the company. (2019-06-25)
How the brain helps us make good decisions -- and bad ones
A prevailing theory in neuroscience holds that people make decisions based on integrated global calculations that occur within the frontal cortex of the brain. (2019-06-25)
Why money cannot 'buy' housework
If a man is handy with the vacuum cleaner, isn't averse to rustling up a lush family meal most nights after he's put on the washing machine having popped into the supermarket on his way home then it's more than likely his partner will have her own bank account. (2019-06-24)
Neural networks taught to recognize similar objects on videos without accuracy degradation
Andrey Savchenko, Professor at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University), has developed a method that can help to enhance image identification on videos. (2019-06-21)
Democrats and Republicans agree: Take politics out of health policymaking
It's no secret that Americans are politically divided, but a new report offers hope that Democrats and Republicans find common ground on at least one issue: the role of 'evidence' in developing and shaping health laws. (2019-06-18)
What influences critical care doctors in withdrawing life support for patients with brain injury?
Decisions to withdraw life support treatments in critically ill patients with severe brain injury are complicated, are based on many factors, and are usually made by critical care physicians and families in the intensive care unit. (2019-06-17)
Can computers make decisions like humans? A new study may have the answer
A team of British researchers has developed a method that enables computers to make decisions in a way that is more similar to humans. (2019-06-03)
'Mindreading' neurons capable of having expectations about the behavior of the others
Psychologists and philosophers had long suggested that simulation is the mechanism whereby humans understand the minds of others. (2019-05-28)
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