Nav: Home

Current Defects News and Events

Current Defects News and Events, Defects News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
New metamaterial morphs into new shapes, taking on new properties
Electrochemical reactions drive shape change in new nanoarchitected metamaterial. (2019-09-11)
Numerical simulations probe mechanisms behind sand dune formation
After noticing how the construction of dams significantly alter the hydrodynamics of natural rivers and the resulting downstream riverbed evolution, researchers decided to apply numerical simulations to help determine what's at play in the relationship of sediment motion and flow conditions. (2019-09-10)
The secret strength of gnashing teeth
There's a method to finite element modeling for materials microarchitecture to make super strong glass. (2019-09-10)
Silicon as a semiconductor: Silicon carbide would be much more efficient
In power electronics, semiconductors are based on the element silicon -- but the energy efficiency of silicon carbide would be much higher. (2019-09-05)
A novel recipe for efficiently removing intrinsic defects from hard crystals
A team of researchers from Osaka University, the Institute for High Pressure Physics and the Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences (Russia), and TU Dresden (Germany), discovered an effective method for removing lattice defects from crystals. (2019-09-04)
Future of LEDs Gets Boost from Verification of Localization States in InGaN Quantum Wells
LEDs made of indium gallium nitride provide better luminescence efficiency than many of the other materials used to create blue and green LEDs, but a big challenge of working with InGaN is its known dislocation density defects that make it difficult to understand its emission properties. (2019-09-04)
Addition of growth factors to unique system helps new bone formation
New technique aids bone formation. (2019-08-28)
Researchers' review paper reveal insights into high quality fabrication of nanocomposites
SUTD together with research collaborators provide much needed analysis and review of the emerging research on particle reinforced metal matrix nanocomposites with selective laser melting, charting out possibilities for engineering applications. (2019-08-26)
Software for diagnostics and fail-safe operation of robots developed at FEFU
A team of scientists from School of Engineering at Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Institute of Automation and Control Processes, and Institute of Marine Technology Problems of the Far Eastern Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences developed a software module to automatically diagnose defects in sensors and electric drives in various kinds of robots. (2019-08-22)
Findings shed new light on why Zika causes birth defects in some pregnancies
A new study shows that the risk of giving birth to a child with microcephaly might be related to how the immune system reacts against the Zika virus -- specifically what kind of antibodies it produces. (2019-08-14)
Researchers turn off backscattering, aim to improve optical data transmission
Engineers at the University of Illinois have found a way to redirect misfit light waves to reduce energy loss during optical data transmission. (2019-08-12)
Scientists uncover the intricacies of the 'on/off switch' that creates cell differentiation
A team of biologists has discovered how cells become different from each other during embryogenesis, a finding that offers new insights into genetic activity and has implications for better understanding the onset of disease and birth defects. (2019-08-08)
Researchers embrace imperfection to improve biomolecule transport
While watching the production of porous membranes used for DNA sorting and sequencing, University of Illinois researchers wondered how tiny steplike defects formed during fabrication could be used to improve molecule transport. (2019-08-05)
New computational method could advance precision medicine
Scientists have devised a new computational method that reveals genetic patterns in the massive jumble of individual cells in the body. (2019-08-01)
From Japanese basket weaving art to nanotechnology with ion beams
The properties of high-temperature superconductors can be tailored by the introduction of artificial defects. (2019-08-01)
SibFU scientists discovered material that can make solar cells more efficient
Researchers at Siberian Federal University, together with colleagues from the Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm, Sweden), discovered new properties of material based on palladium, which can increase the performance of solar cells. (2019-07-31)
Treating solar cell materials reveals formation of unexpected microstructures
Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites have been used in optoelectronic devices including solar cells, photodetectors, light-emitting diodes and lasers, but the surface of hybrid perovskites is prone to surface defects, where charge carriers are trapped in the semiconducting material. (2019-07-30)
'Deforming' solar cells could be clue to improved efficiency
Solar cells and light sensing technologies could be made more efficient by taking advantage of an unusual property due to deformations and defects in their structures. (2019-07-29)
Biologists and mathematicians team up to explore tissue folding
MIT scientists have now discovered a key feature of embryonic tissue that helps explain how this process is carried out so faithfully each time. (2019-07-25)
T cells trim the fat and protect against obesity
Specialized immune cells protect against obesity by regulating the diverse communities of intestinal bacteria in mice, according to a new study, which shows how changes in gut microbiota can influence the development of metabolic disorders. (2019-07-25)
Folic acid reduces risk of neural tube defects linked to HIV drug dolutegravir
HIV drug doluteglavir interferes with the binding of folate to its receptor, thus promoting neural tube defects. (2019-07-23)
Risk of neural tube defects higher for babies of women on HIV therapy with dolutegrav
Children born to women on HIV therapy containing the drug dolutegravir since conception have a slightly higher risk of neural tube defects, compared to children born to women on regimens of other antiretroviral drugs. (2019-07-22)
Greater prevalence of congenital heart defects in high intensity oil and gas areas
Mothers living near more intense oil and gas development activity have a 40-70% higher chance of having children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) compared to those living in areas of less intense activity, according to a new study from researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health. (2019-07-18)
The interlayers help perovskite crystallisation for high-performance light-emitting diodes
Scientists at Linkoping University working with colleagues from China have shown how to achieve efficient perovskite light-emitting diodes (LEDs). (2019-07-16)
Electronic chip mimics the brain to make memories in a flash
Engineers have mimicked the human brain with an electronic chip that uses light to create and modify memories. (2019-07-16)
Old protein, new tricks: UMD connects a protein to antibody immunity for the first time
How can a protein be a major contributor in the development of birth defects, and also hold the potential to provide symptom relief from autoimmune diseases like lupus? (2019-07-09)
BioSA -- Bridging the gap with biodegradable metals
The University of Malta has teamed up with Mater Dei Hospital to address the shortcomings of current bone scaffolds on the market in a project entitled Biodegradable Iron for Orthopaedic Scaffold Applications -- BioSA. (2019-07-01)
Rich defects boosting the oxygen evolution reaction
The morphology and electronic structure of LDHs were simultaneously tuned to improve the OER catalytic activity by mild solvothermal reduction using ethylene glycol. (2019-06-27)
Study reveals elevated cancer risk in children with birth defects
A collaborative team of scientists led by Baylor College of Medicine has assembled the largest study to date to evaluate cancer risk in children with birth defects. (2019-06-25)
A new 2D magnet draws future devices closer
EPFL scientists have discovered a new type of 2D magnetic material that can be integrated into spintronic devices. (2019-06-17)
Common conditions keep many patients out of knee cartilage research studies
Issues like age or existing arthritis may preclude patients from participating in clinical studies for new therapies that could benefit them (2019-06-13)
Replicating fetal bone growth process could help heal large bone defects
To treat large gaps in long bones, like the femur, which often can result in amputation, researched developed a process in a rodent model that partially recreates the bone growth process that occurs before birth. (2019-06-05)
Recreating embryonic conditions at break sites can help bones heal faster
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania have developed a unique technique that uses stem cells and flexible implantable bone-stabilizing plates to help speed the healing of large breaks or defects. (2019-06-05)
UV light may illuminate improvements for next generation electronic devices
NITech scientists have developed the method to make sure the mechanisms to connect between the two-dimensional layer of atoms and the semiconductors as perfect as possible, which will lead to develop novel optoelectronic devices. (2019-06-04)
Imperfection is OK for better MOFs
Imaging defects in MOF crystals, and monitoring how they develop, will allow control of defect formation to design better MOFs for many applications. (2019-05-27)
AI and high-performance computing extend evolution to superconductors
In a new study from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, researchers used the power of artificial intelligence and high-performance supercomputers to introduce and assess the impact of different configurations of defects on the performance of a superconductor. (2019-05-24)
Defects in cellular antennae can cause a common heart condition
Katelynn Toomer and colleagues have discovered that defects in tiny, hair-like cellular structures can lead to mitral valve prolapse (MVP), a common heart disorder that affects up to one in 40 people worldwide. (2019-05-22)
Researchers gain key insight into solar material's soaring efficiency
In collaboration with partners at Loughborough University in the United Kingdom, researchers at CSU's National Science Foundation-supported Next Generation Photovoltaics Center have reported a key breakthrough in how the performance of cadmium telluride thin-film solar cells is improved even further by the addition of another material, selenium. (2019-05-22)
3D-printed 'hyperelastic bone' may help generate new bone for skull reconstruction
Defects of the skull and facial bones can pose difficult challenges for plastic and reconstructive surgeons. (2019-05-16)
Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale
An emerging suite of information technologies based on fundamental quantum physics has been given a boost by researchers at the University of Oxford, who have invented a method to engineer single atomic defects in diamond using laser processing. (2019-05-14)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.