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Current Deforestation News and Events

Current Deforestation News and Events, Deforestation News Articles.
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New energy strategy in Cameroon to help avert 28,000 deaths and reduce global temperatures
A new study, published in Environmental Health Perspectives, has found that clean cooking with liquified petroleum gas (LPG) could avert 28,000 premature deaths and reduce global temperatures through successful implementation of a new national household energy strategy in Cameroon. (2020-04-02)
The naming of the shrew
Researchers at Louisiana State University have discovered a new species of shrew, which they have named the hairy-tailed shrew, or Crocidura caudipilosa. (2020-03-11)
Smaller tropical forest fragments vanish faster than larger forest blocks
In one of the first studies to explicitly account for fragmentation in tropical forests, researchers report that smaller fragments of old-growth forests and protected areas experienced greater losses than larger fragments, between 2001 and 2018. (2020-03-11)
Is your coffee contributing to malaria risk?
Researchers at the University of Sydney and University of São Paulo, Brazil, estimate 20% of the malaria risk in deforestation hot spots is driven by the international trade of exports including: coffee, timber, soybean, cocoa, wood products, palm oil, tobacco, beef and cotton. (2020-03-09)
Destruction of an Atlantic rain forest fragment raises the local temperature
Brazilian researchers show that if 25% of a one-hectare forest remnant is cut down, the impact on the local climate will be a temperature increase of 1 °C. (2020-03-04)
More than 60% of Myanmar's mangroves has been deforested in the last 20 years: NUS study
New research from the National University of Singapore showed that between 1996 and 2016, substantial mangrove forests have been converted to agricultural use in Myanmar. (2020-03-03)
NUS-led study suggests mangrove forests provide cause for conservation optimism, for now
An international team of researchers led by Associate Professor Daniel Friess and Dr Erik Yando of the National University of Singapore has found that globally, mangrove loss rates have reduced by almost an order of magnitude between the late 20th and early 21st century -- from what was previously estimated at one to three per cent per year, to about 0.3 to 0.6 per cent per year, thanks in large part to successful mangrove conservation efforts. (2020-02-25)
New research shows that El Niño contributes to insect collapse in the Amazon
Hotter and drier El Niño events are having an alarming effect on biodiversity in the Amazon Rainforest and further add to a disturbing global insect collapse, scientists show. (2020-02-09)
Secondary forests provide deforestation buffer for old-growth primary forests
Currently, re-growing forests comprise roughly 21% of previously deforested areas in the Brazilian Amazon. (2020-02-06)
New research highlights how plants are slowing global warming
A new paper reveals how humans are helping to increase the Earth's plant and tree cover, which absorbs carbon from the atmosphere and cools our planet. (2020-01-31)
Increasing tropical land use is disrupting the carbon cycle
An international study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden shows that the rapid increase in land use in the world's tropical areas is affecting the global carbon cycle more than was previously known. (2020-01-28)
Sustainability claims about rubber don't stick
Companies work hard to present an environmentally responsible image. How well do these claims stack up? (2020-01-22)
Research shows potential for zero-deforestation pledges to protect wildlife in oil palm
New research has found that environmental efforts aimed at eliminating deforestation from oil palm production have the potential to benefit vulnerable tropical mammals. (2020-01-20)
Climate may play a bigger role than deforestation in rainforest biodiversity
In a study on small mammal biodiversity in the Atlantic Forest, researchers found that climate may affect biodiversity in rainforests even more than deforestation does. (2020-01-17)
Study finds deforestation is changing animal communication
Deforestation is changing the way monkeys communicate in their natural habitat, according to a new study. (2020-01-09)
Geographers find tipping point in deforestation
University of Cincinnati geography researchers have identified a tipping point for deforestation that leads to rapid forest loss. (2020-01-07)
Protecting two key regions in Belize could save threatened jaguar, say scientists
Scientists studying one of the largest populations of jaguars in Central Belize have identified several wildlife corridors that should be protected to help the species survival. (2020-01-06)
Jaguars could prevent a not-so-great American biotic exchange
In eastern Panama, canid species from North and South America are occurring together for the first time. (2020-01-06)
Climate change and deforestation could decimate Madagascar's rainforest habitat by 2070
A study in Nature Climate Change has found that, left unchecked, the combined effects of deforestation and human-induced climate change could eliminate Madagascar's entire eastern rainforest habitat by 2070, impacting thousands of plants, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians that are endemic to the island nation. (2020-01-02)
Climate change not the only threat to vulnerable species, habitat matters
Though climate change is becoming one of the greatest threats to the Earth's already stressed ecosystems, it may not be the most severe threat today for all species, say authors of a new report on the effects of deforestation on two lemur species in Madagascar. (2019-12-23)
Amazon forest regrowth much slower than previously thought
The regrowth of Amazonian forests following deforestation can happen much slower than previously thought, a new study shows. (2019-12-19)
Estimates of ecosystem carbon mitigation improved towards the goal of the Paris agreement
The recent reports from the IPCC concluded that new land-use options to enhance the terrestrial carbon sink are needed to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement on Climate. (2019-12-12)
Deforestation, erosion exacerbate mercury spikes near Peruvian gold mining
Scientists from Duke University have developed a model that can predict the amount of mercury being released into a local ecosystem from deforestation. (2019-12-12)
Megadroughts fueled Peruvian cloud forest activity
New research from Florida Tech found that strong and long-lasting droughts parched the usually moist Peruvian cloud forests, spurring farmers to colonize new cropland. (2019-12-09)
Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up
Tropical species are six times more sensitive to forests being broken up for logging or farming than temperate species, says new research. (2019-12-05)
Global carbon emissions increase but rate has slowed
Global carbon emissions are set to grow more slowly in 2019, with a decline in coal burning offset by strong growth in natural gas and oil use worldwide -- according to new research. (2019-12-03)
Global levels of biodiversity could be lower than we think, new study warns
Biodiversity across the globe could be in a worse state than previously thought, as assessments fail to account for long-lasting impact of land change, a new study has warned. (2019-12-02)
Climate science: Amazon fires may enhance Andean glacier melting
Burning of the rainforest in southwestern Amazonia (the Brazilian, Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon) may increase the melting of tropical glaciers in the Andes, according to a study in Scientific Reports. (2019-11-28)
First operational mapping system for high-resolution tropical forest carbon emissions created using
For the first time, scientists have developed a method to monitor carbon emissions from tropical forests at an unprecedented level of detail. (2019-11-28)
Planting on pasture land may provide sustainable alternative for oil palm plantations
Converting already-degraded pasture to oil palm plantations avoids the large loss of stored carbon associated with clearing rainforests to make way for these plantations, according to a long-term, Colombia-based study. (2019-11-20)
When grown right, palm oil can be sustainable
Turning an abandoned pasture into a palm tree plantation can be carbon neutral, according to a new study by EPFL and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL). (2019-11-20)
Amazon deforestation and number of fires show summer of 2019 not a 'normal' year
The perceived scale of the Amazon blazes received global attention this summer. (2019-11-15)
ASU study shows some aquatic plants depend on the landscape for photosynthesis
ASU researchers found that not only are freshwater aquatic plants affected by climate, they are also shaped by the surrounding landscape. (2019-11-14)
A study warns about the ecological impact caused by sediment accumulation in river courses
Insects, crustaceans and other water macroinvertebrates are more affected by the effect of sediment accumulation in river courses than the excess of nitrate in water environments, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2019-11-13)
Gold mining critically impairs water quality in rivers across Peruvian biodiversity hotspot
A Dartmouth study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that artisanal-scale gold mining is altering water clarity and dynamics in the Madre de Dios River watershed in Peru, a tropical biodiversity hotspot. (2019-11-11)
Lost trees hugely overrated as environmental threat, study finds
Cutting down trees inevitably leads to more carbon in the environment, but deforestation's contributions to climate change are vastly overestimated, according to a new study. (2019-11-04)
Carbon bomb: Study says climate impact from loss of intact tropical forests grossly underreported
A new study in the journal Science Advances says that carbon impacts from the loss of intact tropical forests has been grossly underreported. (2019-10-30)
Intact forest loss 'six times worse' for climate
The impact of losing intact tropical forests is more devastating on the climate than previously thought, according to University of Queensland-led research. (2019-10-30)
Study shows how climate change may affect environmental conservation areas
Researchers classify 258 protected areas in Brazil as 'moderately vulnerable' and 17 as 'highly vulnerable'. (2019-10-30)
Human activities boosted global soil erosion already 4,000 years ago
Soil erosion reduces the productivity of ecosystems, it changes nutrient cycles and it thus directly impacts climate and society. (2019-10-29)
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