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Current Dengue virus News and Events

Current Dengue virus News and Events, Dengue virus News Articles.
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Rotavirus cell invasion triggers a cacophony of calcium signals
Time-lapsing imaging and other experimental approaches reveal that rotavirus induces hundreds of discrete and highly dynamic calcium spikes that increase during peak infection. (2019-07-25)
HIV spreads through direct cell-to-cell contact
The spread of pathogens like the HI virus is often studied in a test tube, i.e. in two-dimensional cell cultures, even though it hardly reflects the much more complex conditions in the human body. (2019-07-25)
Genetic screen identifies genes that protect cells from Zika virus
A new Tel Aviv University study uses a genetic screen to identify genes that protect cells from Zika viral infection. (2019-07-25)
Trapping female mosquitoes helps curb chikungunya virus
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently developed an Autocidal Gravid Ovitrap (AGP trap) that attracts and captures female mosquitoes looking for a site to lay eggs. (2019-07-25)
Study reveals how HIV infection may contribute to metabolic conditions
A single viral factor released from HIV-infected cells may wreak havoc on the body and lead to the development of metabolic diseases. (2019-07-25)
Light pollution may be increasing West Nile virus spillover from wild birds
House sparrows infected with West Nile virus (WNV) that live in light polluted conditions remain infectious for two days longer than those who do not, increasing the potential for a WNV outbreak by about 41%. (2019-07-24)
Mount Sinai researchers develop novel vaccine that induces antibodies that contribute to protection
Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed a novel vaccine consisting of DNA and recombinant proteins?proteins composed of a portion of an HIV protein and another unrelated protein. (2019-07-23)
Encephalitis identified as rare toxicity of immunotherapy treatment
The results, published July 22 in Nature Medicine, are the latest findings by VICC researchers chronicling rare but serious toxicities that may occur with immune checkpoint inhibitors, the most widely prescribed class of immunotherapies. (2019-07-22)
Genetic differences between strains of Epstein-Barr virus can alter its activity
Researchers at the University of Sussex have identified how differences in the genetic sequence of the two main strains of the cancer-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can alter the way the virus behaves when it infects white blood cells. (2019-07-18)
Gut microbes protect against neurologic damage from viral infections
Gut microbes produce compounds that prime immune cells to destroy harmful viruses in the brain and nervous system, according to a mouse study published today in eLife. (2019-07-16)
Singapore scientists uncover mechanism behind development of viral infections
A team of researchers from the SingHealth Duke-NUS Academic Medicine Centre's Viral Research and Experimental Medicine Centre (ViREMiCS) found that immune cells undergoing stress and an altered metabolism are the reasons why some individuals become sick from viral infections while others do not, when exposed to the same virus. (2019-07-16)
HIV: Holes in the immune system left unrepaired despite drug therapy
If they don't receive antiretroviral therapy (ART), most HIV patients see a progressive weakening of their immune system. (2019-07-15)
HIV may affect the brain despite ongoing antiretroviral therapy
HIV-positive patients are living longer thanks to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but the virus can remain in some tissues, preventing a total cure. (2019-07-15)
New virus found in one-third of all countries may have coevolved with human lineage
Published in Nature Microbiology, a new study has investigated the origin and evolution of a virus called crAssphage, which may have coevolved with human lineage. (2019-07-11)
The Zika epidemic in Cuba, reflected by imported cases in Barcelona
Travelers returning to Barcelona mirrored the 2017 Zika outbreak in Cuba, according to a study led by the Hospital Clínic of Barcelona and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health, an institution supported by 'la Caixa'. (2019-07-10)
Old protein, new tricks: UMD connects a protein to antibody immunity for the first time
How can a protein be a major contributor in the development of birth defects, and also hold the potential to provide symptom relief from autoimmune diseases like lupus? (2019-07-09)
Investigating the role of the nasal flora & viral infection on acquisition of Pneumococcus
Researchers at LSTM, along with colleagues at the University of Edinburgh and the University Medical Center Utrecht have looked at the impact of the natural microbial flora or microbiota in the nose and viral co-infection on pneumococcal acquisition in healthy adults. (2019-07-08)
A common gut virus that maps our travels
This benign virus changes as we travel, is found in two-thirds of the world's population, and has deep implications for future drug delivery and personalized medicine. (2019-07-08)
Global survey shows crAssphage gut virus in the world's sewage
A global survey shows that a family of gut bacteria viruses called crAssphage is found in people -- and their sewage -- all over the world. (2019-07-08)
Strain of common cold virus could revolutionize treatment of bladder cancer
A strain of the common cold virus has been found to potentially target, infect and destroy cancer cells in patients with bladder cancer, a new study in the medical journal Clinical Cancer Research reports. (2019-07-04)
Gut microbes protect against flu virus infection in mice
Commensal gut microbes stimulate antiviral signals in non-immune lung cells to protect against the flu virus during early stages of infection, researchers report July 2 in the journal Cell Reports. (2019-07-02)
Antibiotics weaken flu defenses in the lung
Antibiotics can leave the lung vulnerable to flu viruses, leading to significantly worse infections and symptoms, finds a new study in mice led by the Francis Crick Institute. (2019-07-02)
Why do mosquitoes choose us? Lindy McBride is on the case
Most of the 3,000+ mosquito species are opportunistic, but Princeton's Lindy McBride is most interested in the mosquitoes that scientists call 'disease vectors' -- carriers of diseases that plague humans -- some of which have evolved to bite humans almost exclusively. (2019-07-02)
Model predicts bat species with the potential to spread deadly Nipah virus in India
Since its discovery in 1999, Nipah virus has been reported almost yearly in Southeast Asia, with Bangladesh and India being the hardest hit. (2019-06-27)
Honeybees infect wild bumblebees -- through shared flowers
Viruses in managed honeybees are spilling over to wild bumblebee populations though the shared use of flowers, a first-of-its-kind study reveals. (2019-06-26)
Genetically modified virus combats prostate cancer
In a study with mice, a gene therapy developed in Brazil kills cancer cells and avoids adverse side effects when combined with chemotherapy. (2019-06-26)
Vaccination programs substantially reduce HPV infections and precancerous cervical lesions
Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination programs have substantially reduced the number of infections and precancerous cervical lesions caused by the virus, according to a study published today in The Lancet by researchers from Université Laval and the CHU de Québec-Université Laval Research Centre. (2019-06-26)
No cell is an island
In a new study, published on June 25, 2019, in the journal eLife, the researchers report that higher levels of doublets -- long dismissed as technical artifacts -- can be found in people with severe cases of tuberculosis or dengue fever. (2019-06-25)
Combatting the world's deadliest infections using groundbreaking human-mimetic tools
A new article published today in the journal Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology shows that research built around human-mimetic tools are more likely to succeed in the search for effective treatments for and prevention of flavivirus infection as compared to research using monkeys or other animals as laboratory models. (2019-06-24)
Skin bacteria could save frogs from virus
Bacteria living on the skin of frogs could save them from a deadly virus, new research suggests. (2019-06-21)
Newly discovered immune cells at the frontline of HIV infection
Researchers at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research have discovered brand new immune cells that are at the frontline of HIV infection. (2019-06-21)
Scientists discover a powerful antibody that inhibits multiple strains of norovirus
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health and their colleagues at the University of Texas at Austin and the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center have discovered an antibody that broadly inhibits multiple strains of pandemic norovirus, a major step forward in the development of an effective vaccine for the dreaded stomach virus. (2019-06-18)
Virus genes help determine if pea aphids get their wings
Researchers from the University of Rochester shed light on the important role that microbial genes, like those from viruses, can play in insect and animal evolution. (2019-06-14)
BTI researchers discover interactions between plant and insect-infecting viruses
Aphids and the plant viruses they transmit cause billions of dollars in crop damage every year. (2019-06-13)
Early-season hurricanes result in greater transmission of mosquito-borne infectious disease
The timing of a hurricane is one of the primary factors influencing its impact on the spread of mosquito-borne infectious diseases such as West Nile Virus, dengue, chikungunya and Zika, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2019-06-13)
Honeybee mite raises bumblebee virus risk
A mite that spreads a dangerous virus among honeybees also plays an indirect role in infecting wild bumblebees, new research shows. (2019-06-12)
Researcher identifies adjuvant that prevents vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease in RSV
A unique adjuvant, a substance that enhances the body's immune response to toxins and foreign matter, can prevent vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease, a sickness that has posed a major hurdle in vaccine development for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), according to a study led by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2019-06-12)
Checkmate for hepatitis B viruses in the liver
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich, working in collaboration with researchers at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf and the University Hospital Heidelberg, have for the first time succeeded in conquering a chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus in a mouse model. (2019-06-11)
USPSTF recommends PrEP to prevent HIV infection in people at high risk
In a new recommendation, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends clinicians offer preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with effective antiretroviral therapy to people at high risk of acquiring HIV to decrease their risk of infection with the virus that causes AIDS. (2019-06-11)
A new picture of dengue's growing threat
New research shows the expanded risk of dengue virus infection through 2080, with detailed maps for 2020, 2050 and 2080. (2019-06-10)
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