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Current Dengue virus News and Events

Current Dengue virus News and Events, Dengue virus News Articles.
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Newly discovered virus infects bald eagles across America
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown virus infecting nearly a third of America's bald eagle population. (2019-10-18)
Next-generation sequencing used to identify cotton blue disease in the United States
Cotton blue disease, caused by Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), was first reported in 1949 in the Central African Republic and then not again until 2005, when it was reported from Brazil. (2019-10-17)
Mount Sinai researchers bring us one step closer to universal influenza vaccine
The scourge of the influenza virus devastates health and claims many lives worldwide each year. (2019-10-17)
Researchers uncover novel virus type that may shed light on viral evolution
Viruses are non-living creatures, consisting of genetic material encased in a protein coat. (2019-10-16)
In Baltimore, lower income neighborhoods have bigger mosquitoes
Low-income urban neighborhoods not only have more mosquitoes, but they are larger-bodied, indicating that they could be more efficient at transmitting diseases. (2019-10-16)
Sperm and egg cell 'immune response' protects koala DNA
Discovery of a type of immunity that protects koalas' DNA from viruses has importance for the survival of koalas and our fundamental understanding of evolution. (2019-10-14)
Family of crop viruses revealed at high resolution for the first time
For the first-time we can take a molecular-level look at one of the world's deadliest crop killers. (2019-10-11)
Ebola antibodies at work
Scientists in Israel and Germany show, on the molecular level, how an experimental vaccine offers long-term protection against the disease. (2019-10-10)
Koala epidemic provides lesson in how DNA protects itself from viruses
In animals, infections are fought by the immune system. Studies on an unusual virus infecting wild koalas, by a team of researchers from the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Queensland, reveal a new form of 'genome immunity.' The study appears Oct. (2019-10-10)
CRISPR enzyme programmed to kill viruses in human cells
A team led by researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has now turned a CRISPR RNA-cutting enzyme into an antiviral that can be programmed to detect and destroy RNA-based viruses in human cells. (2019-10-10)
Researchers decode the immune response to Ebola vaccine
The vaccine rVSV-EBOV is currently used in the fight against Ebola virus. (2019-10-10)
Vaccine against RSV could be in sight, researchers say
A vaccine for the common and sometimes deadly RSV (respiratory syncytial virus) has been elusive, but scientists say a new discovery puts them much closer to success. (2019-10-09)
Surprise finding about HIV reservoir could lead to better therapies
HIV antiretroviral (ART) meds cannot completely eradicate the virus; it persists in reservoirs inside immune cells. (2019-10-09)
Influenza evolution patterns change with time, complicating vaccine design
Skoltech scientists discovered new patterns in the evolution of the influenza virus. (2019-10-08)
First video of viruses assembling
For the first time, researchers have captured images of the formation of individual viruses, offering a real-time view into the kinetics of viral assembly. (2019-10-04)
How the influenza virus achieves efficient viral RNA replication
New insights on how subunits of the influenza virus polymerase co-evolve to ensure efficient viral RNA replication are provided by a study published Oct. (2019-10-03)
Analysis of HIV-1B in Indonesia illuminates transmission dynamics of the virus
Research into the molecular phylogeny (evolutionary history) of the HIV-1B virus in Indonesia has succeeded in illuminating the transmission period and routes for three clades (main branches of the virus). (2019-10-03)
Understanding the genomic signature of coevolution
An international team of researchers including limnologists from the University of Konstanz shows that rapid genomic changes during antagonistic species interactions are shaped by the reciprocal effects of ecology and evolution. (2019-10-02)
Tracking the HI virus
A European research team led by Prof. Christian Eggeling from the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, the Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT), and the University of Oxford has now succeeded in using high-resolution imaging to make visible to the millisecond how the HI virus spreads between living cells and which molecules it requires for this purpose. (2019-10-02)
Environmental toxins impair immune system over multiple generations
New research shows that maternal exposure to a common and ubiquitous form of industrial pollution can harm the immune system of offspring and that this injury is passed along to subsequent generations, weakening the body's defenses against infections such as the influenza virus. (2019-10-02)
Johns Hopkins researchers advance search for safer, easier way to deliver vision-saving gene therapy
In experiments with rats, pigs and monkeys, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have developed a way to deliver sight-saving gene therapy to the retina. (2019-09-30)
Potent antibody curbs Nipah and Hendra virus attack
A monoclonal antibody has been shown to impede the fusion machinery henipaviruses use to merge with the membrane of cells they are attempting to breach. (2019-09-30)
Immunologists identify T cell homing beacons for lungs
Immunologists have identified a pair of molecules critical for T cells to travel to and populate the lungs. (2019-09-27)
Viruses as modulators of interactions in marine ecosystems
Viruses are mainly known as pathogens - often causing death. (2019-09-26)
A protein essential for chikungunya virus replication identified
Chikungunya is an infectious disease caused by a mosquito-borne virus transmitted to humans. (2019-09-25)
West Nile virus in the New World: Reflections on 20 years in pursuit of an elusive foe
Though eradication of West Nile virus remains beyond our capability, the body of knowledge built since its arrival in the Americas in 1999 is now powering efforts to minimize its impact and prepare for the invasion of other mosquito-borne diseases. (2019-09-24)
Uc san diego researchers isolate switch that kills inactive HIV
University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers have identified a switch controlling HIV reproduction in immune cells which can eliminate dormant HIV reservoirs. (2019-09-24)
Fullerene compounds knock out virus infections
Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology and the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of RAS in collaboration with researchers from four other Russian and foreign research centers have discovered a new reaction that helps obtain water-soluble fullerene derivatives which effectively combat flu viruses, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV). (2019-09-23)
Dengue virus becoming resistant to vaccines and therapeutics due to mutations in specific protein
Researchers from Duke-NUS Medical School, in collaboration with the Agency for Science, Technology and Research's Bioinformatics Institute, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, USA, have discovered that the dengue virus changes its shape through mutations in Envelope protein to evade vaccines and therapeutics. (2019-09-20)
New Penn-developed vaccine prevents herpes in mice, guinea pigs
A novel vaccine developed at Penn Medicine protected almost all mice and guinea pigs exposed to the herpes virus. (2019-09-20)
A single dose of yellow fever vaccine does not offer lasting protection to all children
José Enrique Mejía, Inserm researcher at Unit 1043 Center for Pathophysiology of Toulouse Purpan and Cristina Domingo from the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin have recently shown that around half of children initially protected by the yellow fever vaccination at 9 months of age lose that protection within the next 2 to 5 years, due to disappearance of the neutralizing antibodies. (2019-09-19)
Towards better hand hygiene for flu prevention
Rubbing hands with ethanol-based sanitizers should provide a formidable defense against infection from flu viruses, which can thrive and spread in saliva and mucus. (2019-09-18)
Bat influenza viruses possess an unexpected genetic plasticity
Bat-borne influenza viruses enter host cells by utilizing surface exposed MHC-II molecules of various species, including humans. (2019-09-17)
Researchers find building mutations into Ebola virus protein disrupts ability to cause disease
Creating mutations in a key Ebola virus protein that helps the deadly virus escape from the body's defenses can make the virus unable to produce sickness and activate protective immunity in the infected host, according to a study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2019-09-17)
Mutant live attenuated Ebola virus immunizes non-human primates
Inoculation with an Ebola virus that has mutations in a protein called VP35 does not cause disease and elicits protection in monkeys, researchers show Sept. (2019-09-17)
Anemia may contribute to the spread of dengue fever
Mosquitoes are more likely to acquire the dengue virus when they feed on blood with low levels of iron, researchers report in the 16 September issue of Nature Microbiology. (2019-09-16)
Acute chikungunya infection studied at the molecular level in Brazilian patients
Using a systems biology approach, Brazilian researchers identified several genes that can be explored as therapeutic targets and as biomarkers of predisposition to chronic joint pain. (2019-09-16)
Papillomaviruses may be able to be spread by blood
Researchers found that rabbit and mouse papillomaviruses could be transferred by blood to their respective hosts, raising the possibility that human papillomavirus (HPV) may also be transferable by blood in humans. (2019-09-11)
Black sheep: Why some strains of the Epstein Barr virus cause cancer
The Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is very widespread. More than 90 percent of the world's population is infected -- with very different consequences. (2019-09-09)
Disrupting the gut microbiome may affect some immune responses to flu vaccination
The normal human gut microbiome is a flourishing community of microorganisms, some of which can affect the human immune system. (2019-09-06)
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