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Current Diarrhea News and Events

Current Diarrhea News and Events, Diarrhea News Articles.
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Study: Obesity associated with abnormal bowel habits -- not diet
Because researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center demonstrated for the first time that a strong association between obesity and chronic diarrhea is not driven by diet or physical activity, the findings could have important implications for how physicians might approach and treat symptoms of diarrhea in patients with obesity differently. (2019-09-18)
Study predicts modest impact from additional dose of rotavirus vaccine
Giving children an additional dose of rotavirus vaccine when they are nine months old would provide only a modest improvement in the vaccine's effectiveness in low-income countries, according to a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health and the Institute of Infection and Global Health at the University of Liverpool. (2019-08-14)
Fighting child diarrhea
An automatic chlorine dispenser installed at shared community water points reduces rates of diarrhea in children. (2019-08-08)
Rotavirus cell invasion triggers a cacophony of calcium signals
Time-lapsing imaging and other experimental approaches reveal that rotavirus induces hundreds of discrete and highly dynamic calcium spikes that increase during peak infection. (2019-07-25)
Epic research endeavor reveals cause of deadly digestive disease in children
Nearly 10 years ago, a group of Israeli clinical researchers emailed Berkeley Lab geneticist Len Pennacchio to ask for his team's help in solving the mystery of a rare inherited disease that caused extreme, and sometimes fatal, chronic diarrhea in children. (2019-07-10)
Researchers determine bacteria structure responsible for traveler's diarrhea
For the first time researchers have deciphered the near-atomic structure of filaments, called 'pili', that extend from the surface of bacteria that cause traveler's diarrhea. (2019-07-10)
CFTR inhibition: The key to treating bile acid diarrhea?
Estimates are that roughly 1% of people in Western countries may have bile acid diarrhea, including patients with Crohn's disease, ileal resection, diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D), and chronic functional diarrhea. (2019-07-03)
Autism health challenges could be explained by problem behaviors
For years, researchers have documented both gastrointestinal issues and problematic behaviors, such as aggression, in many children with autism spectrum disorder. (2019-06-27)
Study finds micronutrient deficiencies common at time of celiac disease diagnosis
Micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins B12 and D, as well as folate, iron, zinc and copper, are common in adults at the time of diagnosis with celiac disease. (2019-06-24)
Treatment for common cause of diarrhea more promising
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have figured out how to grow the intestinal parasite Cryptosporidium in the lab, an achievement that will speed efforts to treat or prevent diarrhea caused by the parasite. (2019-06-20)
Best practices of nucleic acid amplification tests for the diagnosis of clostridioides (clostridium)
A new review looks at the challenges of testing for Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile infection (CDI) and recommendations for newer diagnostic tests. (2019-06-04)
Proton therapy for cancer lowers risk of side effects
Proton therapy results in fewer side effects than traditional X-ray radiation therapy for many cancer patients, according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2019-05-22)
Widely used public health surveys may underestimate global burden of childhood diarrhea
Public health surveys used in as many as 90 countries may be missing the number of recent diarrhea episodes among children by asking parents and caregivers to recall events two weeks versus one week out, suggests a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2019-04-03)
Umbralisib shows early promise for patients with marginal zone lymphoma
The investigational therapeutic umbralisib, which targets the molecule PI3K-delta, was well tolerated and highly active in patients with relapsed/refractory marginal zone lymphoma, according to early results from the UNITY-NHL phase II clinical trial, which were presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3. (2019-04-01)
New therapeutic strategy to prevent gastrointestinal disease
In a study published in Nature Medicine, the researchers report new evidence suggesting that specifically targeting MLCK1 may be effective in both preventing and treating gastrointestinal disease by preserving and restoring barrier function, respectively. (2019-04-01)
Edible antibodies to treat and prevent gastrointestinal disorders
Therapeutic antibodies are increasingly being used in the clinic for the treatment of various diseases. (2019-04-01)
Lowering lactose and carbs in milk does not help severely malnourished children
Treating hospitalized, severely malnourished children with a lactose-free, reduced-carbohydrate milk formula does not improve clinical outcomes, according to a study published Feb. (2019-02-26)
Google translates doctor's orders into Spanish and Chinese with few significant errors
In multicultural areas like San Francisco, doctors are increasingly looking to Google Translate to provide written instructions their patients can take home, so they stand a better chance of following medical advice. (2019-02-25)
Tracking cholera in a drop of blood
A multi-institutional, international team of researchers has developed a method that identifies individuals recently infected with Vibrio cholerae O1. (2019-02-20)
New tool for tracking cholera outbreaks could make it easier to detect deadly epidemics
Algorithms using data from antibody signatures in peoples' blood may enable scientists to assess the size of cholera outbreaks and identify hotspots of cholera transmission more accurately than ever, according to a study led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2019-02-20)
UBC researchers develop diagnostic tool for detecting cryptosporidium
Using a small and inexpensive biosensor, researchers in the School of Engineering have developed a novel low-cost technique that quickly and accurately detects cryptosporidium contamination in water samples. (2019-02-14)
See-through fish aid scientists in autism-related breakthrough
University of Miami researchers have discovered a clue in the humble zebrafish's digestive tract that, one day, could help people on the autism spectrum alleviate one of the most common yet least studied symptoms of their disorder: gastrointestinal distress. (2019-02-06)
Rutgers study finds rise in overdoses from opioids in diarrhea drug
A Rutgers study has uncovered a new threat in the opiate epidemic: overdoses of loperamide, an over-the-counter diarrhea medication, have been steadily increasing in number and severity nationwide over five years. (2019-02-04)
Researchers create algorithm to predict PEDV outbreaks
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed an algorithm that could give pig farms advance notice of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) outbreaks. (2019-01-24)
Study examines drug treatments for newborns exposed to opioids during pregnancy
Neonatal abstinence syndrome describes symptoms (including jitteriness, high-pitched crying, sweating and diarrhea) that primarily occur in newborns exposed to opioids during pregnancy. (2019-01-22)
Probiotics no help to young kids with stomach virus
A major US study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2018-11-21)
New study reveals probiotics do not help children with intestinal infections
Probiotics are a multibillion-dollar industry with marketing claims of being an effective treatment for a multitude of ailments, including diarrhea. (2018-11-21)
Probiotic no better than placebo for acute gastroenteritis in children
While probiotics are often used to treat acute gastroenteritis (also known as infectious diarrhea) in children, the latest evidence shows no significant differences in outcomes, compared to a placebo. (2018-11-21)
New study sheds light on norovirus outbreaks, may help efforts to develop a vaccine
Outbreaks of norovirus in health care settings and outbreaks caused by a particular genotype of the virus are more likely to make people seriously ill, according to a new study in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. (2018-11-15)
Report finds inequity may slow progress in preventing child pneumonia and diarrhea deaths
A new report finds health systems are falling woefully short of ensuring the most vulnerable children have sufficient access to prevention and treatment services in 15 countries that account for 70% of the global pneumonia and diarrhea deaths in children under five. (2018-11-08)
Cluster of factors could help predict C. diff
A cluster of factors may help predict which patients are likely to develop Clostridioides difficile, a potentially life-threatening disease commonly known as C. difficile or C. diff, a new study has found. (2018-10-24)
Multi-strain probiotic reduces chemotherapy-induced diarrhoea [ESMO 2018 Press Release]
A high concentration of multi-strain probiotic helps to reduce mild to moderate episodes of chemotherapy-induced diarrhoea (CID) in cancer patients, according to results of a phase II/III study in India. (2018-10-22)
With a microbe-produced toxin, bacteria prove old dogs can learn new tricks
In the ongoing chemical battles among bacteria and their microbial neighbors, a new toxin has been uncovered. (2018-10-18)
University of Guelph researcher develops 3-in-1 vaccine against traveller's diarrhea
A U of G Prof. has discovered a novel approach to developing a first-ever vaccine for three common pathogens that cause traveller's diarrhea and kill more than 100,000 children living in developing countries each year. (2018-10-10)
Unseen infections harming world's children, research reveals
Children around the world are suffering from unnoticed infections that are stunting their growth and mental development, new research from an international coalition of scientists reveals. (2018-10-09)
Researchers seek vaccine for 'traveler's diarrhea'
A joint effort between the University of Georgia and the University of Texas at Austin has discovered how ETEC works to cause disease. (2018-09-25)
Discomfort or death? New study maps hot spots of child mortality from diarrhea in Africa
New high-resolution maps pinpoint areas across Africa with concentrations of child deaths from diarrhea and show uneven progress over 15 years to mitigate the problem. (2018-09-19)
How bad bacteria gain an edge in the gut
The bacterium Clostridium difficile, which is responsible for the majority of antibiotic-associated diarrhea outbreaks worldwide, produces a unique compound called p-cresol to gain a competitive advantage over natural protective gut bacteria. (2018-09-11)
Cryptosporidiosis worsened in mice on probiotics
In an unexpected research finding infections with the intestinal parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, worsened in mice that had been given a probiotic. (2018-08-31)
Guidance for preventing C. difficile in neonatal intensive care
Newborns require special diagnosis and treatment considerations for an infectious diarrhea known as Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile) infection, according to a new evidence-based white paper published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2018-08-30)
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