Current Disability News and Events

Current Disability News and Events, Disability News Articles.
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Schools unfairly targeting vulnerable children with exclusion policies
Australian schools are unfairly suspending and excluding students - particularly boys, Indigenous students, and students with a disability - according to new research from the University of South Australia. (2020-11-10)

Analysis reveals high burden of musculoskeletal disorders across the globe
Musculoskeletal disorders--which affect muscles, tendons, ligaments, bones, and joints--can severely affect individuals' physical and mental health, and they're especially prevalent among aging adults. Although many researchers are studying these conditions and their rates in different regions of the world, no study to date has provided an overview of the burden of all musculoskeletal disorders. Investigators have now done so in Arthritis & Rheumatology, an official journal of the American College of Rheumatology. (2020-11-05)

Asian ethnicity strongly linked to COVID-related stroke
Asian ethnicity is strongly linked to COVID-related stroke, reveals an analysis of stroke centre activity in England and Scotland during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic, and accepted for publication in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. (2020-11-05)

COVID-19 linked to worse stroke outcomes
People who experience strokes while infected with COVID-19 appear to be left with greater disability after the stroke, according a study led by UCL and UCLH researchers. (2020-11-05)

People with disabilities view health care access as human right, study shows
Analysis of national survey data of Americans with disabilities finds they overwhelmingly view health care access as a human right, but many barriers stand in their way, including insurance tied to employment and policy makers not listening. They also view the ACA positively, even though they span the political spectrum. (2020-10-27)

Study confirms genetic link in cerebral palsy
An international research team including the University of Adelaide has found further evidence that rare gene mutations can cause cerebral palsy, findings which could lead to earlier diagnosis and new treatments for this devastating movement disorder. (2020-10-07)

Could arm squeezes with blood pressure cuffs help the brain recover after stroke?
People who are given clot-busting drugs after a stroke may recover better if they also are given a therapy called remote ischemic postconditioning, according to a new study published in the October 7, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Remote ischemic conditioning is when blood flow, and the oxygen it carries, is stopped and then restored repeatedly by blood pressure cuffs worn on the arms. (2020-10-07)

Exploring the golden hour: Delays in trauma treatment linked to disability and death
Some clinicians consider that after a traumatic injury, patients are most likely to survive if they receive medical treatment within one hour--the so-called 'golden hour.' A new study led by Chiang Wen-Chu at National Taiwan University Hospital, Yunlin Branch, and published October 6th, 2020 in PLOS Medicine, explores that idea, finding that longer delays in treatment could increase a patient's risk of disability or death. (2020-10-06)

Novel Drosophila-based disease model to study human intellectual disability syndrome
The researchers from the TalTech molecular neurobiology laboratory headed by professor Tõnis Timmusk used the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster to develop a novel disease model for Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS). Their study was reported in the July issue of Disease Models and Mechanisms. (2020-09-29)

Lockdown mental health problems amongst family carers up to 10 times higher
Family carers for children and adults with intellectual disabilities have reported rates of mental health problems under lockdown that are up to 10 times higher than parents without those responsibilities, a new study has found. They were five times more likely to report severe anxiety, and between four and ten times more likely to report major depression, compared to parents who did not have caring responsibilities for children with intellectual disability. (2020-09-24)

Caregiving factors may affect hospitalization risk among disabled older adults
Few studies have investigated the potential impact of caregivers and caregiver factors on older adults' likelihood of being hospitalized. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society has now provided some insights. (2020-09-23)

Is rheumatoid arthritis two different diseases?
While disease activity improves over time for most rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, long-term outcomes only improve in RA patients with autoantibodies, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Xanthe Matthijssen of Leiden University Medical Center, Netherlands, and colleagues. The findings add to a growing body of evidence that RA with and without autoantibodies are two distinct conditions. (2020-09-22)

Perspective on employment rates after spinal cord injury - 30 years after the ADA
Thirty years after the passage of the ADA, planning for return to work is often a low priority during rehabilitation for spinal cord injury, The authors emphasize that vocational rehabilitation services, when delivered soon after injury and integrated into the medical rehabilitation plan, contribute to better employment outcomes. ''Implementing evidence-based practices during rehabilitation is an important step toward fulfilling the promises of the ADA for people with spinal cord injury,'' Dr. O'Neill concluded. (2020-09-22)

College students with disabilities at greater risk for substance abuse
College students with physical and cognitive disabilities use illicit drugs more, and have a higher prevalence of drug use disorder, than their non-disabled peers, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-09-21)

Many women suffering from severe migraine might avoid pregnancy, but should they?
A survey of 607 women who suffer from severe migraine found twenty percent of the respondents are currently avoiding pregnancy because of their migraines. The women avoiding pregnancy due to severe migraine tend to be in their thirties, are more likely to have migraine triggered by menstruation, and are more likely to have very frequent attacks (chronic migraine) compared to their counterparts who are not avoiding pregnancy, according to a new study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2020-09-15)

Child disability can reduce educational outcomes for older siblings
A recent paper published in The Economic Journal indicates that, in families with disabled children, the second born child is more adversely affected cognitively than the first-born child. (2020-08-13)

Clot permeability linked to first-attempt success of aspiration thrombectomy
A multicenter study reports that clot perviousness, or permeability - the ability for contrast used during the initial imaging workup to seep through a clot, as estimated by CT imaging - is associated with ''first-pass success'' in large vessel occlusion (LVO) strokes initially treated with an aspiration thrombectomy approach. LVO stroke treatment success using a stent retriever-first approach to remove the brain vessel blockage was less dependent on clot perviousness. (2020-08-11)

BU study: A quarter of arthritis cases linked to excess weight
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study shows that weight loss between early adulthood and midlife lowers arthritis risk, and found no evidence of any persistent risk of arthritis for people who were heavier earlier in life and then lost weight. (2020-08-04)

Raising the bar on disability care
Encouraging paid workers to employ the 'right kind' of respectful personal relationship with young people with disability will lift standards in the sector, experts say. With good quality relationships, children and young adults with cognitive disability feel ''valued, respected and cared about'' in their daily lives and, in turn, give carers more job satisfaction and self-respect, international researchers say in a new paper published in the international Disability & Society journal. (2020-08-03)

Exercise and PRP promising for shoulder pain in wheelchair users with spinal cord injury
''Conservative treatments that provide alternatives to surgery are needed for wheelchair users with spinal cord injury who have recalcitrant shoulder pain. Injection of PRP (platelet-rich plasma), which may promote healing of the injured tendon, combined with a graduated home-based exercise program, is a potential option for these individuals. Based on our pilot study, a larger randomized controlled trial is warranted.'' (2020-07-29)

Antibiotics alone successfully treat uncomplicated appendicitis in children
Of 1,068 patients from 10 health centers enrolled in the study, 67.1% of those who elected to initially manage their care through antibiotics alone experienced no harmful side effects and did not later require an appendectomy by their one-year follow-up appointment. Patients in the non-operative group experienced an average of 6.6 disability days, compared to the 10.9 days in the surgery group. (2020-07-27)

Pioneering brain haemorrhage treatment reduces long-term disability in premature babies
Premature babies with serious brain haemorrhage treated with a 'brain washing' technique pioneered by Bristol researchers have shown in a 10-year follow-up study, were twice as likely to survive without severe learning disability when compared with infants given standard treatment. The findings are published today [5 July] in the journal Archives of Diseases in Childhood. (2020-07-04)

Kessler survey shows education paves the way to employment for youth with disabilities
The 2020 survey collected a wealth of information, including details of college majors and occupations, finding that students with disabilities were more likely to pursue career paths focused on helping people, and less likely to choose STEM majors, or to work in STEM disciplines. ''Preparing for STEM careers will help people with disabilities take advantage of this growth sector in our economy,'' said Dr. O'Neill. ''Research shows that this is a disparity that can be addressed with the right support system,'' he added. (2020-06-30)

Those with IDD living in group homes more likely to die from COVID-19, study shows
A new study published recently in the Disability and Health Journal by researchers from Syracuse University and SUNY Upstate Medical University shows that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) living in residential group homes are more likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19 and die from the virus than those without IDD. (2020-06-25)

Medicinal cannabis may reduce behavioral problems in kids with intellectual disabilities
Cannabidiol, a type of medicinal cannabis, may reduce severe behavioural problems in children and adolescents with an intellectual disability a new study has found. (2020-06-24)

Mutations linked to intellectual disability point to overly active ion channe
Two mutations identified in individuals with developmental and epileptic brain disease can be traced back to the same ion channel. Researchers have now elucidated how both independent mutations affect the channel's function: by making it overly active and highly sensitive to stimulation. (2020-06-18)

Children with developmental disabilities more likely to develop asthma
Children with developmental disabilities or delay are more at risk of developing asthma, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open led by public health researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) as part of the Center for Pediatric Population Health. (2020-06-16)

73% of LGBTQ youth bullied for reasons beyond their sexual identity
73% of SGM adolescents surveyed reported experiences of bias-based bullying for reasons beyond their sexual or gender identities, such as being bullied because of their body weight (57%), race/ethnicity (30%) and religion (27%). Each type of bullying was positively related to health risk, including depression, sleep problems, stress, and unhealthy weight control behaviors. (2020-06-15)

Experts clarify subtypes of multiple sclerosis to improve care and clinical trials
An international committee has clarified previously published descriptors of courses of MS and disease activity. MS subtypes are consensus definitions rather than pathologically defined phenotypes, and easily misconstrued. The clarification was prompted in part by differences in specified indications for MS therapies recently approved by the FDA and EMA. The goal is to improve care and refine the selection of clinical trial participants so that trial outcomes can better inform clinical care. (2020-06-11)

Keep moving to prevent major mobility disability
According to research, being physically inactive is the strongest risk factor for disability as we age. A team of researchers created a study to examine the effects of performing light physical activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on older adults. The researchers were interested in studying how participating in these different intensities of activity, and whether a person spreads their physical activity throughout the day, affects the chances for developing a major mobility disability. (2020-06-11)

National survey gives insight into college-to-work experiences of recent college graduates
Recent college graduates with disabilities were as likely to be employed as their peers without disabilities with 90 percent of each group holding jobs after college. These findings reflect the pathways that have opened for people with disabilities since the ADA,. The Survey can also guide decision making made more complicated by the COVID economy; for example, encouraging transition-age students with disabilities to pursue higher education is solid advice. (2020-06-03)

Those with IDD more likely to die from COVID-19, study shows
A new study by researchers from Syracuse University and SUNY Upstate Medical University shows that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are more likely to die from COVID-19 than those without IDD. The disparity -- 1,800 more deaths per 100,000 people diagnosed with COVID-19 -- is likely related to a higher prevalence of comorbid diseases among those with IDD, and/or a higher percentage of people with IDD are living in congregate residential settings. (2020-05-28)

No evidence blanket 'do-not-resuscitate' orders for COVID-19 patients are necessary
It's inappropriate to consider blanket do-not-resuscitate orders for COVID-19 patients because adequate data is not yet available on US survival rates for in-hospital resuscitation of COVID-19 patients and data from China may not relate to US patients, according to a new article published today in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal. (2020-05-22)

Healthcare rationing could see 'unlawful deaths' from COVID-19, researchers claim
Current medical guidelines risk unlawful deaths of patients -- with doctors, hospitals, and even the government potentially liable -- if a second peak forces hard choices due to shortages of ventilators and other critical care resources. (2020-05-21)

Blood test may help predict whose MS will get worse
A blood test may help predict which people with multiple sclerosis (MS) will get worse during the following year, according to a study published in the May 20, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-05-20)

Cord blood study provides insights on benefits, limitations for autism treatment
In a recent study, Duke researchers tested whether a single infusion of a unit of a child's own or donor cord blood could improve social communication skills in children between the ages of 2-7 diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. (2020-05-19)

New rare disease with own facial features, cardiac defects and developmental delay
An international multicentre study describes a rare disease characterized by a series of recognizable facial features, cardiac defects and intellectual disability, which they propose to name as TRAF7 syndrome -according to the name of the gen that causes this pathology. (2020-05-19)

COVID-19 crisis triage -- Optimizing health outcomes and disability rights
New England Journal of Medicine article offers policy recommendations for triage protocols that save the most lives and protect core values, such as the equal moral worth of all people. (2020-05-19)

One in ten patients with major vascular event, infection, or cancer will be misdiagnosed
According to a new study published in De Gruyter's open access journal Diagnosis, approximately one in 10 people (9.6%) in the United States with symptoms caused by major vascular events, infections, or cancers will be misdiagnosed. (2020-05-15)

Washington Post's depictions of autism shift from 'cause and cure' to acceptance
The Washington Post's depiction of autism has shifted over the years from a focus on 'cause and cure' toward one of acceptance and accommodation, say the authors of a study that examined 315 articles published from 2007 to 2017. (2020-05-14)

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