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Current Discrimination News and Events

Current Discrimination News and Events, Discrimination News Articles.
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How prison and police discrimination affect black sexual minority men's health
Incarceration and police discrimination may contribute to HIV, depression and anxiety among Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men, according to a Rutgers led study. (2020-07-02)
Lifetime discrimination may increase risk of hypertension among African Americans
A study of African Americans in Mississippi shows an association between experiencing discrimination over a lifetime and developing hypertension (also referred to as high blood pressure). (2020-07-01)
Showing pro-diversity feelings are the norm makes individuals more tolerant
Showing people how their peers feel about diversity in their community can make their actions more inclusive, make members of marginalized groups feel more like they belong, and even help close racial achievement gaps in education, according to a new study. (2020-07-01)
From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion
Do children have to wait until age 8 to recognize -- spontaneously and without instructions -- the same emotion of happiness or anger depending on whether it is expressed by a voice or on a face? (2020-06-30)
Sexist views on education within families affect future academic choices
The lockdown measures introduced to prevent the spread of the coronavirus have led to classrooms being closed. (2020-06-26)
Automated stage discrimination of Parkinson's Disease -- BIO Integration
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this research article the authors Vered Aharonson, Nabeel Seedat, Simon Israeli-Korn, Sharon Hassin-Baer, Michiel Postema and Gilad Yahalom from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, Tel Aviv Academic College of Engineering, Tel Aviv, Israel, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel and Tel Aviv University, Israel consider automated stage discrimination of Parkinson's Disease. (2020-06-26)
Gender bias kept alive by people who think it's dead
Workplace gender bias is being kept alive by people who think it's no longer an issue, new research suggests. (2020-06-26)
Researchers study myxobacteria's ability to distinguish self from non-self
The new research addresses the mechanism of how myxobacteria discriminate and how highly related strains recently diverged, or evolved, into distinct social groups. (2020-06-22)
Age discrimination laws don't protect older women as they do older men
Older women in the workforce should be considered collectively as a unique demographic group that includes both gender and age if they're to receive adequate protection against workplace discrimination, according to a new paper published by a University at Buffalo economist. (2020-06-18)
Study finds Oregon's gender-affirming health care good on paper; still lacking in practice
While Oregon ranks highly nationwide for its gender-affirming policies and health care for transgender women, many of those polices are not fully realized in practice, a recent study from Oregon State University found. (2020-06-17)
Opposition to sexual- and gender-minority rights linked to support for Christian dominance
Many Christian and political conservatives in the U.S. support legislation to deny sexual and gender minorities the rights most Americans enjoy: unfettered access to jobs, housing, services and public facilities; the opportunity to marry as they choose; and the right to adopt a child. (2020-06-11)
Discrimination may erase 'birthweight advantage' of black US immigrants in one generation
Black women have the highest prevalence of low birthweight babies, but black immigrants typically have much better outcomes than their US-born counterparts. (2020-06-03)
Women at lower risk for cardiovascular disease than men
Women's risk of falling ill with cardiovascular disease, and dying from it, is lower than that of men of the same age, irrespective of where in the world they live. (2020-06-03)
Major gaps in HIV programs in Africa
HIV management in developing countries varies with socioeconomic and structural circumstances, with two Flinders University studies finding examples of key ways to close the gap for those worst affected in developing countries. (2020-05-31)
International research improves quality of CT scan imagery
Computerized tomography (CT) is one of the most effective medical tests for analysing the effects of many illnesses, including COVID-19. (2020-05-08)
Providing child support after prison: Some state policies may miss the mark
Many states have policies that attempt to help formerly incarcerated people find work by limiting an employer's ability to access or use criminal records as part of the hiring process. (2020-05-04)
Immunity passports to vaccination certificates for COVID-19: Equitable & legal challenges
As governments from countries including the US, Germany, Italy and the UK, explore the possibility of issuing so-called 'immunity passports,' a leading global health and legal scholar warns that such action poses significant practical, equitable, and legal issues. (2020-05-04)
Women in IT more likely to be promoted than men
Women are underrepresented in leadership positions throughout the information technology industry. (2020-04-29)
Addressing black students' concerns about belonging in college has benefits in adulthood
The benefits of a brief 'social belonging' exercise completed by black students in their first year of college followed them into adulthood, with participants reporting greater career satisfaction, well-being and community involvement almost a decade later. (2020-04-29)
LGBTQ military service members at higher risk of sexual harassment, assault, stalking
A recent study found that LGBTQ service members face an elevated risk of sexual victimization including harassment, assault and stalking while in the military than their non-LGBTQ counterparts. (2020-04-21)
How common is racial/ethnic discrimination in US surgical residency programs?
Surveys from nearly 7,000 resident surgeons were used to evaluate how common racial/ethnic discrimination is in US general surgery programs and how it's associated with burnout, thoughts of quitting and suicide. (2020-04-15)
A new window into psychosis
A recent study in mice led a team of researchers in Japan to believe that psychosis may be caused by problems with specialized nerve cells deep within the brain, as well as a certain kind of learning behavior. (2020-03-18)
Self-help groups empower caregivers of children with disabilities
Caregivers in low-income settings will be able to respond to the challenges of bringing up children with disabilities, thanks to a new model created by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI). (2020-03-10)
BU researchers: The health care system is failing transgender cancer survivors
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study is the first-ever population-based study of cancer prevalence in transgender people, estimating 62,530 of the nearly 17 million cancer survivors in the US are transgender. (2020-03-09)
LGBT health improves when friends are just like them
Researchers from Michigan State University are the first to pinpoint social factors that can reduce these stressors and improve health for LGBT people. (2020-03-05)
The persistence of pay inequality: The gender pay gap in an anonymous online labor market
The US is witnessing a dramatic rise in nontraditional 'gig economy' labor markets. (2020-03-04)
Changing the debate around obesity
The UK's National Health Service (NHS) needs to do more to address the ingrained stigma and discrimination faced by people with obesity, says a leading health psychologist. (2020-03-03)
Regular walnut consumption linked to health and longevity in women, according to new study
According to a new epidemiological study, women in their late 50s and early 60s who consumed at least two servings of walnuts per week had a greater likelihood of healthy aging compared to those who did not eat walnuts. (2020-02-25)
Self-reported student mistreatment in US medical schools
An analysis of annual surveys from graduating students at all U.S. (2020-02-24)
How sleep helps teens deal with social stress
Study found that adequate sleep allowed students to cope with discrimination and challenges associated with ethnic or racial bias. (2020-02-24)
Intelligent control of mode-locked femtosecond pulses by time-stretch-assisted spectral analysis
Researchers in China led by Lilin Yi at Shanghai Jiao Tong University developed apparatus and software algorithms allowing automatic 'intelligent control' over the femtosecond pulses generated by mode-locked fiber lasers. (2020-02-18)
Are robots designed to include the LGBTQ+ community?
Robot technology is flourishing in multiple sectors of society, including the retail, health care, industry and education sectors. (2020-02-12)
When kids face discrimination, their mothers' health may suffer
A new study is the first to suggest that children's exposure to discrimination can harm their mothers' health. (2020-02-06)
Invest in social equity to improve health for low-income people
Canada must invest in social spending and recognize that our health care system is not 'universal' if Canadians living in low-income neighborhoods are to have the same chance of good health as other Canadians, argues an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-02-03)
Brain study identifies possible causes of ethnic pain disparities
In a new study, researchers identify possible brain and social factors underlying racial and ethnic disparities in pain. (2020-02-03)
Racial discrimination in mortgage market persistent over last four decades
A new Northwestern University analysis finds that racial disparities in the mortgage market suggest that discrimination in loan denial and cost has not declined much over the previous 30 to 40 years, yet discrimination in the housing market has decreased during the same time period. (2020-01-23)
Facial paralysis stigma takes emotional toll, especially when acquired later in life
People with facial paralysis are more likely to face depression and anxiety than the general population, especially if the paralysis occurs later in life rather than at birth, according to a recent study. (2020-01-23)
How universities may help bridge social divide between international, domestic students
Self-esteem is a valuable resource for undergraduate international students trying to socialize with their domestic counterparts at American universities, but new research by a University at Buffalo psychologist suggests that while self-esteem predicts better socialization with domestic students, it is curiously unrelated to how international students socialize with other internationals. (2020-01-08)
Math test score gap between white and non-white students in Brazil due to complex factors
School test scores often show gaps in performance between white and non-white students. (2020-01-02)
Health impact of support between African American couples when dealing with racial discrimination
Experiences of racial discrimination are a common source of stress for African Americans, and research shows discrimination can have a damaging impact on physical and emotional health. (2019-12-18)
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