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Current Discrimination News and Events

Current Discrimination News and Events, Discrimination News Articles.
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Mediterranean diet during pregnancy associated with improved maternal health outcomes
A new clinical trial found women who followed a Mediterranean-style diet during pregnancy, including a daily portion of tree nuts (half being walnuts) and extra virgin olive oil, had a 35 percent lower risk of gestational diabetes and on average, gained 2.75 pounds less, compared to women who received standard prenatal care. (2019-07-24)
How mammals' brains evolved to distinguish odors is nothing to sniff at
Neuroscientists from the Salk Institute and UC San Diego have discovered that at least six types of mammals--from mice to cats--distinguish odors in roughly the same way, using circuitry in the brain that's evolutionarily preserved across species. (2019-07-18)
Homeless people are denied basic health care, research finds
A study led by the University of Birmingham, UK, has painted a shaming picture of neglect and discrimination shown towards the homeless when accessing UK health services. (2019-07-15)
Using artificial intelligence to detect discrimination
A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool for detecting unfair discrimination -- such as on the basis of race or gender -- has been created by researchers at Penn State and Columbia University. (2019-07-10)
Research questions link between unconscious bias and behavior
Implicit bias, a term for automatically activated mental associations, is often seen as a primary cause of discrimination against social groups such as women and racial minorities. (2019-07-01)
LGBTQ Asian-Americans seen as more 'American'
For Asian-Americans who are gay or lesbian, their sexual orientation may make them seem more 'American' than those who are presumed straight. (2019-06-27)
Seizures in Alzheimer's mouse model disrupt adult neurogenesis
Working with animal models of Alzheimer's disease, a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine discovered that seizures that are associated with the disease both in animal models and humans alter the normal dynamics of neurogenesis in adult brains. (2019-06-25)
Hate speech on Twitter predicts frequency of real-life hate crimes
According to a first-of-its-kind study, cities with a higher incidence of a certain kind of racist tweets reported more actual hate crimes related to race, ethnicity, and national origin. (2019-06-24)
Ageism reduced by education, intergenerational contact
Researchers at Cornell University have shown for the first time that it is possible to reduce ageist attitudes, prejudices and stereotypes through education and intergenerational contact. (2019-06-21)
Latest artificial intelligence research from China in Big Data
China is among the leaders in the rapidly advancing artificial intelligence field, and its broad range of cutting-edge research expertise is on display in this special issue on 'Artificial Intelligence in China' of Big Data. (2019-06-18)
LGBTQ awareness lacking among American neurologists, new survey finds
A first-of-its-kind survey of American neurologists reveals that more than half carry the mistaken belief that a patient's sexual orientation and gender identity have no bearing on treatment of neurologic illness. (2019-06-17)
Evidence of hiring discrimination against nonwhite groups in 9 countries examined
A new meta-analysis on hiring discrimination by Northwestern University sociologist Lincoln Quillian and his colleagues finds evidence of pervasive hiring discrimination against all nonwhite groups in all nine countries they examined. (2019-06-17)
Supportive families and schools help prevent substance use among trans youth: UBC study
Strong family and school connections are helping prevent transgender youth from smoking cigarettes and using marijuana, even among those targeted by violence. (2019-06-10)
Sellers on classified ad websites favor buyers from affluent neighborhoods
New Rice University research has found that people selling stuff on classified ad websites prefer dealing with buyers from affluent neighborhoods. (2019-06-10)
Only 2% of black Chicagoan' allegations of police misconduct were sustained
Between 2011 and 2014, just 2% of allegations made by black Chicagoans resulted in a recommendation for sanction against an officer, compared to 20% for white complainants, and 7% for Latino complainants. (2019-06-06)
Racism has a toxic effect
Researchers have long known that racism is linked to health problems, but now results from a small study using RNA tests show that racism appears to increase chronic inflammation among African Americans. (2019-05-31)
Perceived discrimination associated with well-being in adults with poor vision
This study of nearly 7,700 men and women 50 or older in England looked at how common perceived discrimination was among those with visual impairment and how that was associated with emotional well-being. (2019-05-30)
Lupus characteristics and progression differ among racial/ethnic groups
In the first epidemiologic study comparing lupus among four major racial/ethnic groups, researchers found that, following a lupus diagnosis, blacks, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics are at increased risk of developing problems related to the kidneys, the neurological system, and the blood. (2019-05-22)
Workplace discrimination: if they don't fit, they always call in sick?
Prof. Florian Kunze (University of Konstanz, Cluster of Excellence 'The Politics of Inequality') and Max Reinwald (University of Konstanz, Graduate School for Decision Sciences) investigate workplace behavior of employees who are in the minority in their teams. (2019-05-08)
Five things to know about physician suicide
Physician suicide is an urgent problem with rates higher than suicide rates in the general public, with potential for extensive impact on health care systems. (2019-05-06)
Feeling valued, respected appear most important for job satisfaction in academic medicine
A survey of physicians in the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Medicine finds that feeling valued, being treated with respect and working in a supportive environment were the factors most strongly associated with job satisfaction. (2019-05-06)
House hunting is a struggle for mixed-race families
Couples with a black partner were significantly more likely to move to a neighborhood that was racially diverse but less affluent. (2019-04-29)
New study aims to validate pediatric version of sequential organ failure assessment
A new study aims to validate the pediatric version of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score in the emergency department setting as a predictor of mortality in all patients and patients with suspected infection. (2019-04-28)
Policies valuing cultural diversity improve minority students' sense of belonging
Psychology researchers exploring the belonging and achievement of middle school students found valuing cultural diversity reduces achievement gaps over the course of a year, while policies that favor colorblindness and assimilation led to wider achievement gaps. (2019-04-24)
Lower approval rates evidence of discrimination for same-sex borrowers
Mortgage lenders are less likely to approve loans for same-sex couples. (2019-04-16)
Bright spot analysis for photodynamic diagnosis of brain tumors using confocal microscopy
A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University have found that bright spot areas have generally lower fluorescence in brain tumors than in normal tissues in images captured by irradiation with a 405 nm wavelength laser and 544.5-619.5 nm band-pass filter. (2019-04-11)
Discrimination may affect adolescents' sleep quality
In a Child Development study of daily diary descriptions of discrimination by minority adolescents, experiencing discrimination during the day was associated with compromised sleep quality that night, as well as feelings of greater daytime dysfunction and sleepiness the following day. (2019-04-03)
The Lancet Public Health: Ageism linked to poorer health in older people in England
Ageism may be linked with poorer health in older people in England, according to an observational study of over 7,500 people aged over 50 published in The Lancet Public Health journal. (2019-04-03)
Mental health stigma, fueled by religious belief, may prevent latinos from seeking help
Religious and cultural beliefs may discourage many Latinos in the United States from seeking treatment for depression and other mental health disorders, a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study finds. (2019-04-01)
Stop the exploitation of migrant agricultural workers across Italy
Writing in The BMJ today, Dr Claudia Marotta and colleagues say more than 1,500 agricultural workers have died as a result of their work over the past six years, while others have been killed by the so-called 'Caporali' who are modern slave masters. (2019-03-27)
Women are 30 percent less likely to be considered for a hiring process than men
Women are on average 30% less likely to be called for a job interview than men with the same characteristics. (2019-03-25)
Discrimination, PTSD may lead to high preterm-birth rates among African-American women
African-American women are nearly twice as likely to give birth prematurely as white women. (2019-03-25)
Some US Muslims identify less as Americans due to negative media coverage
Negative media portrayals of Muslim Americans can have adverse effects on how they view themselves as citizens and their trust in the US government. (2019-03-20)
Older immigrants living in US more satisfied with life than native-born counterparts
Most people who immigrated to the United States for a chance to live the 'American Dream' are more satisfied with their lives in the 'land of the free' than those who were born here, according to new research from Florida State University. (2019-03-20)
A school that values diversity could result in health benefits for students of color
Students of color who attend schools with a culture that emphasizes the value of diversity -- specifically schools whose mission statements mention goals such as serving a diverse student body and appreciating diversity and cultural differences -- show better cardiovascular health than peers whose schools do not express such values, according to a new collaborative study done by researchers at Northwestern and Stanford universities. (2019-03-11)
Research suggests adoption assessment tool lags behind societal changes
A UBC researcher says a tool to assess potential adoptive parents does not meet the needs of lesbian, gay or gender minority adults. (2019-03-08)
3D simulation of bone densitometry predict better the risk of fracture due to osteoporosis
Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease in which there is a decrease in bone mass density. (2019-03-05)
A disconnect between migrants' stories and their health
While some Mexican immigrants give positive accounts about migrating to and living in the United States, their health status tells a different story. (2019-02-25)
LGBTQ youths are over-represented, have poorer outcomes in child welfare system
LGBTQ youths are more likely to end up in foster care or unstable housing and suffer negative outcomes, such as substance abuse or mental health issues, while living in the child welfare system, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin. (2019-02-11)
Walnut consumers tend to have lower prevalence of depression symptoms, says new study
A new epidemiological study suggests consuming walnuts may be associated with a lower prevalence and frequency of depression symptoms among American adults. (2019-02-07)
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