Nav: Home

Current Diversity News and Events

Current Diversity News and Events, Diversity News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Coastal pollution reduces genetic diversity of corals, reef resilience
A new study by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology found that human-induced environmental stressors have a large effect on the genetic composition of coral reef populations in Hawai'i. (2020-04-02)
About the distribution of biodiversity on our planet
Large open-water fish predators such as tunas or sharks hunt for prey more intensively in the temperate zone than near the equator. (2020-04-01)
Infants introduced early to solid foods show gut bacteria changes that may portend future health risks
Infants who were started on solid foods at or before three months of age showed changes in the levels of gut bacteria and bacterial byproducts, called short-chain fatty acids, measured in their stool samples, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2020-03-31)
Celebrating our genomic diversity: Fine-scale differences in the Japanese population
The Japanese population has long been thought of as genetically homogeneous as a result of limited population mixing. (2020-03-26)
Study shows commonly used mouthwash could make saliva significantly more acidic
The first study looking at the effect of chlorhexidine mouthwash on the entire oral microbiome has found its use significantly increases the abundance of lactate-producing bacteria that lower saliva pH, and may increase the risk of tooth damage. (2020-03-24)
Improving success of giraffe translocations
In two new studies, an international team of researchers identifies the ideal composition of a group of giraffes to be translocated for conservation purposes and provides guidelines for all aspects of the translocation process. (2020-03-19)
Bursts of diversity in the gut microbiota
The diversity of bacteria in the human gut is an important biomarker of health, influences multiple diseases, such as obesity and inflammatory bowel diseases and affects various treatments. (2020-03-12)
The naming of the shrew
Researchers at Louisiana State University have discovered a new species of shrew, which they have named the hairy-tailed shrew, or Crocidura caudipilosa. (2020-03-11)
Deep-sea fish community structure strongly affected by oxygen and temperature
In a new study, researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) took advantage of the natural oceanographic gradient in the Gulf of California to study the effects of variable oxygen levels and temperatures on demersal fish communities. (2020-03-05)
Diversity semantics shift higher ed inclusivity away from students of color
Affirmative action in higher education was originally meant to rebalance the scales of mostly-white, mostly-male institutions. (2020-03-04)
Obesity promotes virulence of influenza
Obesity promotes the virulence of the influenza virus, according to a study conducted in mice published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2020-03-03)
Directed species loss from species-rich forests strongly decreases productivity
At high species richness, directed loss, but not random loss, of tree species strongly decreases forest productivity. (2020-03-02)
Paleontologists discover why the oceans are so diverse
Slow, steady evolution in animal groups that contain many different ecological lifestyles has been a key buffer against extinction, the new research shows. (2020-02-28)
Illinois study shows universally positive effect of cover crops on soil microbiome
Only a fraction of conventional row crop farmers grow cover crops after harvest, but a new global analysis from the University of Illinois shows the practice can boost soil microbial abundance by 27%. (2020-02-27)
Extinction resistance, not speciation, shaped ecologically diverse modern marine fauna
Ecologically diverse clades came to dominate the modern oceans because they were better buffered against the successive mass extinctions events which reshaped marine animals over evolutionary time -- not because of their higher rates of speciation, according to a new study. (2020-02-27)
Eat or be eaten
Plants obtain their energy from the sun. Other beings rely on eating to survive. (2020-02-26)
How the urban environment affects the diet of its citizens
In the high-impact journal Appetite the UPV/EHU's Nursing and Health Promotion research group has published a study using photovoice methodology and which qualitatively compares citizens' perceptions about the food environment in three Bilbao neighbourhoods with different socioeconomic levels. (2020-02-24)
New mathematical model reveals how major groups arise in evolution
Researchers at Uppsala University and the University of Leeds presents a new mathematical model of patterns of diversity in the fossil record, which offers a solution to Darwin's ''abominable mystery'' and strengthens our understanding of how modern groups originate. (2020-02-19)
Variety and consistency are essential to keep the mind healthy
The well-known adage 'use it or lose it' is just as important in your 30's as it is in older adults. (2020-02-18)
How gliding animals fine-tuned the rules of evolution
Since its inception in 1867, The American Naturalist has maintained its position as one of the world's premier peer-reviewed publications in ecology, evolution, and behavior research. (2020-02-17)
Researchers uncover the moscow subway microbiome
Recently, a group of ITMO University researchers has looked into the microbiome of the Moscow Subway. (2020-02-13)
Huge bacteria-eating viruses found in DNA from gut of pregnant women and Tibetan hot spring
University of Melbourne and the University of California, Berkeley, scientists have discovered hundreds of unusually large, bacteria-killing viruses with capabilities normally associated with living organisms. (2020-02-13)
Gut feelings: Gut bacteria are linked to our personality
Sociable people have a higher abundance of certain types of gut bacteria and also more diverse bacteria, an Oxford University study has found. (2020-02-12)
New world map of fish genetic diversity
An international research team from ETH Zurich and French universities has studied genetic diversity among fish around the world for the first time. (2020-02-10)
'Rule breaking' plants may be climate change survivors
Plants that break some of the 'rules' of ecology by adapting in unconventional ways may have a higher chance of surviving climate change, according to researchers from the University of Queensland and Trinity College Dublin. (2020-02-09)
East African fish in need of recovery
A study of East African coral reefs has uncovered an unfolding calamity for the region: plummeting fish populations due to overfishing, which in turn could produce widespread food insecurity. (2020-02-06)
Simplifying simple sequence repeats
Simple sequence repeats (or microsatellites) continue to be widely used in a variety of biological disciplines, including forensics, paternity testing, population genetics, genetic mapping, and phylogeography. (2020-01-31)
Immune systems not prepared for climate change
Researchers have for the first time found a connection between the immune systems of different bird species, and the various climatic conditions in which they live. (2020-01-30)
Prescribed burns benefit bees
Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, according to new research from North Carolina State University. (2020-01-29)
Making 'lemonade': Chance observation leads to study of microbial bloom formation
A team from the Microbial Diversity course at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass., studied a brackish, shallow lagoon over time and found it releases hydrogen sulfide, particularly upon physical disturbance, causing blooms of anoxygenic sulfur-oxidizing phototrophs. (2020-01-23)
Fungal diversity and its relationship to the future of forests
Stanford researchers predict that climate change will reduce the diversity of symbiotic fungi that help trees grow. (2020-01-22)
Research supports new approach to mine reclamation
Geomorphic reclamation is a relatively novel approach intended to mimic the topography of nearby undisturbed lands, with a wide variety of terrain that is stable and less susceptible to erosion. (2020-01-21)
Caterpillar loss in tropical forest linked to extreme rain, temperature events
Using a 22-year dataset of plant-caterpillar-parasitoid interactions collected within a patch of protected Costa Rican lowland Caribbean forest, scientists report declines in caterpillar and parasitoid diversity and density that are paralleled by losses in an important ecosystem service: biocontrol of herbivores by parasitoids. (2020-01-21)
Climate may play a bigger role than deforestation in rainforest biodiversity
In a study on small mammal biodiversity in the Atlantic Forest, researchers found that climate may affect biodiversity in rainforests even more than deforestation does. (2020-01-17)
Human fetal lungs harbor a microbiome signature
The lungs and placentas of fetuses in the womb -- as young as 11 weeks after conception -- already show a bacterial microbiome signature, which suggests that bacteria may colonize the lungs well before birth. (2020-01-17)
New parasitoid wasp species discovered in the Amazon -- can manipulate host's behavior
A research group from the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku studies the diversity of parasitoid insects around the world. (2020-01-14)
Antibiotics could be promising treatment for form of dementia
Researchers at the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine have found that a class of antibiotics called aminoglycosides could be a promising treatment for frontotemporal dementia. (2020-01-10)
Improved functioning of diverse landscape mosaics
It is well-established that biodiverse ecosystems generally function better than monocultures. (2020-01-09)
Gut microbes may improve stroke recovery
New research shows that short chain fatty acids could help protect brain cells from damage caused by inflammation after a stroke. (2020-01-08)
Texas A&M study reveals domestic horse breed has third-lowest genetic diversity
A new study by Dr. Gus Cothran, professor emeritus at the Texas A&M School of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, has found that the Cleveland Bay horse breed has the third-lowest genetic variation level of domestic horses, ranking above only the notoriously inbred Friesian and Clydesdale breeds. (2019-12-18)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.