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Current Dna sequences News and Events

Current Dna sequences News and Events, Dna sequences News Articles.
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New human reference genome resources help capture global genetic diversity
Scientists have assembled a set of genetic sequences that enable the reference genome to better reflect global genetic diversity. (2019-10-16)
DNA fracturing rewires gene control in cancer
A multi-institutional team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has brought attention to genomic structural variation as a previously unappreciated mechanism involved in altering DNA methylation, a form of gene control, in human cancers. (2019-10-15)
Ludwig researchers develop machine learning tool to refine personalized immunotherapy
Ludwig Cancer Research scientists have developed a new and more accurate method to identify the molecular signs of cancer likely to be presented to helper T cells, which stimulate and orchestrate the immune response to tumors and infectious agents. (2019-10-15)
New DNA 'clock' could help measure development in young children
Scientists have developed a molecular 'clock' that could reshape how pediatricians measure and monitor childhood growth and potentially allow for an earlier diagnosis of life-altering development disorders. (2019-10-15)
Sperm and egg cell 'immune response' protects koala DNA
Discovery of a type of immunity that protects koalas' DNA from viruses has importance for the survival of koalas and our fundamental understanding of evolution. (2019-10-14)
Physics: DNA-PAINT super-resolution microscopy at speed
Optimized DNA sequences allow for 10-times faster image acquisition in DNA-PAINT. (2019-10-11)
New test offers improved diagnosis and management of chronic hepatitis B
A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, describes a new and powerful laboratory tool that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. (2019-10-10)
Buttons and flies help Hopkins solve longtime DNA mystery
Biologists at Johns Hopkins University have uncovered an important clue in the longtime mystery of how long strands of DNA fold up to squeeze into microscopic cells, with each pair of chromosomes aligned to ensure perfect development. (2019-10-10)
Musical perception: nature or nurture?
This is the subject of the research by Juan Manuel Toro (ICREA) and Carlota Pagès Portabella, researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition, published in the journal Psychophysiology as part of a H2020 project being carried out with Fundació Bial to understand the neuronal bases of musical cognition. (2019-10-10)
Researchers use game theory to successfully identify bacterial antibiotic resistance
Washington State University researchers have developed a novel way to identify previously unrecognized antibiotic-resistance genes in bacteria. (2019-10-09)
How chromosomes change their shape during cell differentiation
Scientists from the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research have provided an explanation of how chromosomes undergo structural changes during cell differentiation. (2019-10-09)
New research uncovers how common genetic mutation drives cancer
A new, multicenter study led by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center determined how a single mutation in splicing factor 3b subunit 1 (SF3B1), the most frequently mutated splicing factor gene, drives the formation of many cancers. (2019-10-09)
Surprise finding about HIV reservoir could lead to better therapies
HIV antiretroviral (ART) meds cannot completely eradicate the virus; it persists in reservoirs inside immune cells. (2019-10-09)
New study challenges our understanding of premature ageing
Disturbances in the function of mitochondrial DNA can accelerate the ageing process in ways that are different than previously thought, according to a new Finnish study published in Nature Metabolism. (2019-10-08)
The deeper these octopuses live, the wartier their skin
Deep beneath the ocean's surface, surprisingly cute pink octopuses creep along the seafloor. (2019-10-08)
DNA metabarcoding useful for analyzing human diet
A new study demonstrates that DNA metabarcoding provides a promising new method for tracking human plant intake, suggesting that similar approaches could be used to characterize the animal and fungal components of human diets. (2019-10-08)
Research maps key signaling pathways linking calcium entry and exit in activated T cells
Like entrance and exit doors on a building, a cell's outer surface has doors -- channels, pumps, and transporters that selectively control what molecules enter or exit. (2019-10-08)
Common denominator that triggers asthma in favorable environments
Some so-called pro-allergic environments strongly promote the development of asthma and are responsible for the dramatic increase in the prevalence of asthma, especially in industrialized countries. (2019-10-07)
Genome-edited bull passes on hornless trait to calves
For the past two years, researchers at the University of California, Davis, have been studying six offspring of a dairy bull, genome-edited to prevent it from growing horns. (2019-10-07)
The cholera bacterium can steal up to 150 genes in one go
EPFL scientists have discovered that predatory bacteria like the cholera pathogen can steal up to 150 genes in one go from their neighbors. (2019-10-07)
Histone modifications are the influencers of zygotic genome awakening
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) observed changes to the gene-regulating factors during zebrafish development and discovered that modifications to 'histone H3', one of the proteins around which DNA is bound, play an important role in 'zygotic genome activation' or transition of control of zebrafish embryonic development from maternal material to the zygote. (2019-10-07)
NUS scientist designs 'express courier service' for immune cells
Dr Andy Tay, a researcher with the National University of Singapore (NUS) who is currently doing his post-doctoral training at Stanford University, has successfully invented a novel transfection method to deliver DNA into immune cells with minimal stress on these cells. (2019-10-04)
Microbiome provides new clues to determining development of colon cancer
Findings showcasing a connection between bacteria in the microbiome and colon cancer, which may be used to screen younger populations at risk, were published in the journal Gastroenterology by researchers from the George Washington University. (2019-10-04)
CNIC scientists discover a new mechanism for the transfer of maternal genetic material
CNIC researchers have identified a mechanism involved in the prevention of possible errors during the transfer of mitochondrial DNA from mothers to their offspring. (2019-10-03)
Stanford scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate
Insect-eating bats navigate effortlessly in the dark and dolphins and killer whales gobble up prey in murky waters thanks in part to specific changes in a set of 18 genes involved in the development of the cochlear ganglion -- a group of nerves that transmit sound from the ear to the brain, according to a study by researchers at Stanford University. (2019-10-03)
Moffitt researchers identify mechanism controlling DNA repair
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers recently identified a new mechanism that controls DNA repair. (2019-10-02)
'Personalized dj' music playlist algorithm matches songs to listeners' changing moods
Imagine having a disc jockey inside your computer who matches the music played to your current frame of mind. (2019-10-02)
New CRISPR-Cas9 variant may boost precision in gene editing
Researchers have developed a new variant of the gene editing technique CRISPR-Cas9 that has the potential to increase precision during gene therapy in humans. (2019-09-30)
New blood test capable of detecting multiple types of cancer
A new blood test in development has shown ability to screen for numerous types of cancer with a high degree of accuracy, a trial of the test led by Dana-Farber shows. (2019-09-28)
Cancer: The origin of genetic mutations
In the presence of some disruptive elements, cancer cells are unable to replicate its DNA optimally. (2019-09-25)
True lies: How letter patterns color perceptions of truth
Cause-and-effect statements may seem more true if the initial letters in the words are in alphabetical order because the human brain prefers patterns that follow familiar sequences. (2019-09-25)
University of Alberta researchers developing new 'DNA stitch' to treat muscular dystrophy
A new therapeutic being tested by University of Alberta researchers is showing early promise as a more effective treatment that could help nearly half of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). (2019-09-25)
Improved mapping of Swedish genes
People -- or more specifically just Swedes -- are more like chimpanzees than previously known. (2019-09-24)
Improved mapping of Swedish genes from 1,000 individuals
People -- or more specifically just Swedes -- are more like chimpanzees than previously known. (2019-09-24)
DNA is held together by hydrophobic forces
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, disprove the prevailing theory of how DNA binds itself. (2019-09-23)
Why the lettuce mitochondrial genome is like a chopped salad
The genomes of mitochondria are usually depicted as rings or circles. (2019-09-20)
First glimpse at what ancient Denisovans may have looked like, using DNA methylation data
Exactly what our ancient Denisovan relatives might have looked like had been anyone's guess for a simple reason: the entire collection of Denisovan remains includes a pinky bone, three teeth, and a lower jaw. (2019-09-19)
Key similarities discovered between human and archaea chromosomes
A study led by Indiana University is the first to reveal key similarities between chromosomes in humans and archaea. (2019-09-19)
Long lost human relative unveiled
Many people are familiar with the existence of Neanderthals, the humanoid species that was a precursor to modern humans, but far less is known Denisovans, a similar group that were contemporaries to the Neanderthals and who died out approximately 50,000 years ago. (2019-09-19)
Scientists develop DNA microcapsules with built-in ion channels
A Research group led by Tokyo Tech reports a way of constructing DNA-based microcapsules that hold great promise for the development of new functional materials and devices. (2019-09-18)
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