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Current DNA News and Events, DNA News Articles.
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Choanozoan and picozoan marine protists are probably virus eaters - study
Scientists used single-cell genomics to show that two groups of poorly known marine protists routinely ingest viruses. (2020-09-24)
Early admixture with humans led to Y chromosome replacement in late Neanderthals
In one of the first studies to comprehensively analyze Y chromosomes of humans' two closest relatives, Denisovans and Neanderthals, researchers report what prior studies have suggested: early gene flow events between archaic and modern humans led to the eventual replacement of archaic Neanderthal Y chromosomes by introgressed Homo sapiens Y chromosomes. (2020-09-24)
Y chromosomes of Neandertals and Denisovans now sequenced
An international research team led by Martin Petr and Janet Kelso of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has determined Y chromosome sequences of three Neandertals and two Denisovans. (2020-09-24)
Unraveling the genome in 3D-space
Proper folding of extremely long chromosomal DNA molecules is crucial for the correct functioning of the cell. (2020-09-23)
Multidisciplinary approaches to solving cold cases
Forensic DNA analysis enables new and increasingly sophisticated Technology for solving cold cases. (2020-09-23)
'Firefly' imaging method zooms in on 'the forces within us'
Scientists have developed a new technique using tools made of luminescent DNA, lit up like fireflies, to visualize the mechanical forces of cells at the molecular level. (2020-09-22)
Epigenetics linked to genetic differences between domesticated and wild chickens
Some of the genetic differences that have arisen between domesticated chickens and their wild ancestors, the red junglefowl, are linked to epigenetic changes, according to a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-09-21)
Your cells look young for their age, compared to a chimp's
Many humans live to see their 80s, some even reach 100. (2020-09-20)
Algorithms uncover cancers' hidden genetic losses and gains
Limitations in DNA sequencing technology make it difficult to detect some major mutations often linked to cancer, such as the loss or duplication of parts of chromosomes. (2020-09-17)
Replicating a genome starts with a twist, a pinch, and a bit of a dance
DNA replication begins with a set of proteins--the Origin of Replication Complex (ORC). (2020-09-16)
Building bridges: PARP enzymes bring broken DNA together
St. Jude researchers capture the structure of PARP enzymes at work, leading to a new understanding of DNA repair that may aid cancer treatments targeting the process. (2020-09-16)
Domestic horses probably did not originate in Anatolia
Domestic horses likely did not originate in Anatolia as previously suspected, according to a new study of ancient horse remains dating as far back as 9000 BCE. (2020-09-16)
Better communication helps translate molecular tools
Multi-stakeholder collaboration is key for the adoption of molecular approaches that can facilitate accurate, cheaper and faster monitoring of marine ecosystems. (2020-09-16)
DNA damage caused by migrating light energy
Ultraviolet light endangers the integrity of human genetic information and may cause skin cancer. (2020-09-14)
New method to design diamond lattices and other crystals from microscopic building blocks
In a new study appearing in the journal Physical Review Letters, researchers describe a technique for using LEGO®-like elements at the scale of a few billionths of a meter. (2020-09-14)
Researchers reveal a much richer picture of the past with new DNA recovery technique
Researchers at McMaster University have developed a new technique to tease ancient DNA from soil, pulling the genomes of hundreds of animals and thousands of plants -- many of them long extinct -- from less than a gram of sediment. (2020-09-10)
Structure of 'immortality protein' now better understood
A key role in studying the telomerase of Hansenula polymorpha was played by KFU's nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. (2020-09-10)
Epigenetic changes precede onset of diabetes
Epigenetic* changes in the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas can be detected in patients several years before the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. (2020-09-10)
DNA-based nanotechnology stimulates potent antitumor immune responses
Combining their expertise in protein engineering and synthetic DNA technology, Wistar scientists successfully delivered nanoparticle antitumor vaccines that stimulated robust CD8 T cell immunity and controlled melanoma growth in preclinical models. (2020-09-10)
Researchers reveal safeguarding of key DNA sensor in innate immune system
This research, published in Science, reveals in detail how the nucleosomes inside our cells block cGAS from unintentionally triggering the body's innate immune response to our own DNA. (2020-09-10)
Innate immune system -- How cGAS is kept bottled up
In higher organisms, detection of DNA in the cytoplasm triggers an immune reaction. (2020-09-10)
An evolutionary roll of the dice explains why we're not perfect
Scientists have found that chance events can be more important than natural selection in defining the genome of species like humans and other mammals. (2020-09-09)
Artificial intelligence aids gene activation discovery
Scientists have long known that human genes are activated through instructions delivered by the precise order of our DNA. (2020-09-09)
Caffeine shot delivers wakeup call on antifungal drug resistance
The management of fungal infections in plants and humans could be transformed by a breakthrough in understanding how fungi develop resistance to drugs. (2020-09-09)
Through enzyme testing, researchers sharpen CRISPR gene-editing tool
One of the biggest scientific advances of the last decade is getting better thanks to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin; the University of California, Berkeley; and Korea University. (2020-09-08)
Lost frogs rediscovered with environmental DNA
Scientists have detected signs of a frog listed extinct and not seen since 1968, using an innovative technique to locate declining and missing species in two regions of Brazil. (2020-09-08)
Protein causes mutations that lead to breast cancer cell aggression
In her previous research, University of Alberta biochemist Ing Swie Goping identified that the protein, BCL-2 interacting killer (BIK), was associated with relapses in breast cancer patients. (2020-09-08)
A new twist on DNA origami
A team* of scientists from ASU and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) led by Hao Yan, ASU's Milton Glick Professor in the School of Molecular Sciences, and director of the ASU Biodesign Institute's Center for Molecular Design and Biomimetics, has just announced the creation of a new type of meta-DNA structures that will open up the fields of optoelectronics (including information storage and encryption) as well as synthetic biology. (2020-09-07)
New test can detect crown-of-thorns starfish as quickly as a home pregnancy kit
Researchers at the Australian Institute of Marine Science have developed a dipstick test that can detect crown-of-thorns starfish on coral reefs by using the same technology as home pregnancy tests. (2020-09-03)
A 400-year-old chamois will serve as a model for research on ice mummies
The chamois had been protected by the glacier for 400 years and only recently released due to the ice having receded. (2020-09-03)
Finding cortisone alternatives with fewer side effects
Many people use cortisone of a regular basis. It is used for treating rheumatism, asthma, multiple sclerosis, or even COVID-19. (2020-09-02)
New method of detecting illnesses including coronavirus and cystic fibrosis
A new and quicker method of diagnosing diseases in patients has been created by researchers. (2020-09-02)
Rejuvenating old organs could increase donor pool
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital are leading efforts to breathe new life into older organs by leveraging a new class of drugs known as senolytics, which target and eliminate old cells. (2020-08-27)
A Politecnico di Milano study reveals DNA "grammar"
DNA three-dimensional structure is determined by a series of spatial rules based on particular protein sequences and their order. (2020-08-27)
DNA repair - Locating and severing lethal links
Covalent cross-links between proteins and DNA are among the most hazardous types of DNA damage. (2020-08-27)
Barcoding long DNA quantifies CRISPR effects
A sequencing approach can home in on a rare mutation within a large number of cells, revealing implications for CRISPR genome editing and early cancer detection. (2020-08-26)
Single-cell RNA sequencing sheds new light on cancer cells' varied response to chemotherapy
Single-cell analysis, done in three colon cancer cell lines, is believed to be the first to profile transcriptome-level changes in response to DNA damage across individual cells. (2020-08-25)
Mass General researchers create bioluminescent tag to detect DNA break repair
A new bioluminescent reporter that tracks DNA double stranded break (DSB) repair in cells has been developed by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Academia Sinica in Taiwan. (2020-08-21)
Making the DNA melt curve more accurate
NIST researchers find a new (mathematical) twist to improve DNA origami, which could lead to better drug delivery containers and biosensors. (2020-08-19)
Genetic background may affect adaptions to aging
How we adapt to aging late in life may be genetically influenced, according to a study led by a psychologist at the University of California, Riverside. (2020-08-19)
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