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Current Dna News and Events

Current Dna News and Events, Dna News Articles.
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Rules of inheritance rewritten in worms
Laboratory model breaks laws of heredity, opening up new research possibilities in genetics and synthetic biology. (2019-02-21)
Hachimoji -- Expanding the genetic alphabet from four to eight
A new form of synthetic DNA expands the information density of the genetic code, that likely preserves its capability for supporting life, according to a new study. (2019-02-21)
Extinguishing fear memories relies on an unusual change to DNA
Researchers at The University of Queensland have discovered a DNA modification that enhances our ability to extinguish fear. (2019-02-20)
New blood test may map fetal genome for countless mutations
Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a new blood test for genetic disorders that may allow parents to learn about the health of their baby as early as 11 weeks into pregnancy. (2019-02-20)
Scientists reveal how 3D arrangement of DNA helps perpetuate the species
From fathers to children, the delivery of hereditary information requires the careful packing of DNA in sperm. (2019-02-18)
Revealed: The gut microbe source of a carcinogenic, DNA-smashing genotoxin
A new study provides the first direct evidence of how a genotoxic warhead that can target and destroy the DNA of nearby cells renders its carcinogenic effects. (2019-02-14)
Cracking colibactin's code
In an effort to understand how colibactin, a compound produced by certain strains of E. coli, may be connected to the development of colorectal cancer, Harvard researchers are exploring how the compound damages DNA to produce DNA adducts. (2019-02-14)
Sensitive sensor detects Down syndrome DNA
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Down syndrome is the most common birth defect, occurring once in every 700 births. (2019-02-13)
New research suggests a simple blood test could improve the early detection of lung cancer
New research led by scientists at the MRC Toxicology Unit suggests that by analysing levels of DNA in the blood, the early detection of lung cancer could be improved. (2019-02-12)
Infection biology: What makes Helicobacter so adaptable?
The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori owes its worldwide distribution to its genetic adaptability. (2019-02-12)
Why too much DNA repair can injure tissue
MIT researchers have discovered how overactive DNA repair systems can lead to retinal damage and blindness in mice. (2019-02-12)
Gene involved in colorectal cancer also causes breast cancer
Rare mutations in the NTHL1 gene, previously associated with colorectal cancer, also cause breast cancer and other types of cancer. (2019-02-11)
Study of Arctic fishes reveals the birth of a gene -- from 'junk'
Though separated by a world of ocean, and unrelated to each other, two fish groups - one in the Arctic, the other in the Antarctic - share a surprising survival strategy: They both have evolved the ability to produce the same special brand of antifreeze protein in their tissues. (2019-02-11)
DNA traces on wild flowers reveal insect visitors
Researchers have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit. (2019-02-08)
Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components
Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. (2019-02-08)
Nanomachines are taught to fight cancer
Scientists from ITMO University in collaboration with their international colleagues proposed new DNA-based nanomachines that can be used for gene therapy of cancer. (2019-02-07)
Blood leukocytes mirror insufficient sleep
Prior studies have indicated that prolonged insufficient sleep and poor sleep quality are associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular diseases, dementia and psychiatric disorders. (2019-02-07)
Blood cells could hold master clock behind aging
Blood cells could hold the key to aging, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. (2019-02-07)
Male Y chromosomes not 'genetic wastelands'
Researchers from the University of Rochester have found a way to sequence a large portion of the Y chromosome in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster--the most that the Y chromosome has been assembled in fruit flies. (2019-02-06)
Anticancer mechanism revealed in yeast experiments
Scientists uncover how important enzymes in both fission yeast and human cancer cells interact to boost cell proliferation. (2019-02-05)
New anti-CRISPR proteins discovered in soil and human gut
Scientists from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability (DTU) have found four new anti-CRISPR proteins that are distributed across different environments. (2019-02-05)
Yeast study prompts rethink of DNA safekeeping
DNA replication is more prone to errors at times of stress leading to mutations that could cause disease. (2019-02-04)
The web meets genomics: a DNA search engine for microbes
Microbes are the most common and diverse organisms on the planet. (2019-02-04)
Drug target identified for chemotherapy-resistant ovarian, breast cancer
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may have found a path toward improving the effectiveness of chemotherapy in people with breast or ovarian cancer caused by defects in one of the BRCA genes. (2019-02-04)
Structure of virus that infects bacteria in hot springs is revealed
Scientists have revealed the structure of a virus infecting bacteria that thrive in 160-degree hot springs in places like Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. (2019-02-04)
Where does this contamination come from?
Researchers at TU Wien have developed a simple method for detecting water contamination from ruminants directly at source, using a simple DNA test. (2019-02-04)
How transcription factors explore the genome
EPFL scientists have discovered how proteins that regulate gene transcription can scan and bind the genome efficiently. (2019-01-30)
Enzyme that breaks down amino acids may promote aging
Permanently arrested cell growth is known as 'cellular senescence', and the accumulation of senescent cells may be one cause of aging in our bodies. (2019-01-24)
New drug targets for BRCA-driven cancer uncovered
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have conducted a study to systematically identify new genetic targets on which BRCA2 cancer cells are more dependent than healthy cells and have tested these targets in the lab. (2019-01-24)
Sleep deprivation may affect our genes
Sleep deprivation was associated with DNA damage in a new Anaesthesia study. (2019-01-24)
Long-read DNA analysis can give rise to errors, experts warn
Advanced technologies that read long strings of DNA can produce flawed data that could affect genetic studies, research from the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute suggests. (2019-01-22)
How staying in shape is vital for reproductive success
Cells must keep their shape and proportions to successfully reproduce through cell division, finds new research from the Francis Crick Institute and King's College London. (2019-01-21)
Scientists achieve the first stable simulations of DNA crystals
The breakthrough made by researchers at IRB Barcelona allows the study of the role of each molecular component in the stability and conformation of DNA crystals. (2019-01-21)
Frog eggs help researchers understand repair of DNA damages
The DNA replication process, which takes place every time a cell divides, also triggers repair of DNA damage, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have described in a new study, where they have studied extracts from frog eggs, whose proteins are very similar to those of human cells. (2019-01-20)
New technologies enable better-than-ever details on genetically modified plants
Salk researchers have mapped the genomes and epigenomes of genetically modified plant lines with the highest resolution ever to reveal exactly what happens at a molecular level when a piece of foreign DNA is inserted. (2019-01-18)
Molecules of GM food can accumulate in human digestive tract and enter cells of body
An international group of toxicologists, which includes scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), continues to study the potential risks of genetically modified (GM) products. (2019-01-17)
Researchers race against extinction to uncover tree's cancer-fighting properties
As the population of a fir tree in China dwindles, researchers are racing to replicate its cancer-fighting molecules. (2019-01-17)
Proteins use a lock and key system to bind to DNA
Scientists have traditionally thought that DNA binding proteins use patterns in the genome's code of As, Cs, Ts, and Gs to guide them to the right location, with a given protein only binding to a specific sequence of letters. (2019-01-16)
Differences in genes' geographic origin influence mitochondrial function
A new study explores whether interactions between genomes found in the nucleus and in the mitochondria of a cell could be altered when genes of different geographic origins are brought together. (2019-01-14)
Chirality in 'real-time'
Distinguishing between left-handed and right-handed ('chiral') molecules is crucial in chemistry and the life sciences, and is commonly done using a method called circular dichroism. (2019-01-10)
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