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Current Dna News and Events, Dna News Articles.
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Study sheds light on the darker parts of our genetic heritage
More than half of our genome consists of transposons, DNA sequences that are reminiscent of ancient, extinct viruses. Transposons are normally silenced by a process known as DNA methylation, but their activation can lead to serious diseases. (2019-07-19)
A dynamic genetic code based on DNA shape
Under physiological conditions, only certain sequences within the genome, called flipons, are capable of dynamically forming either right- or left-handed DNA. (2019-07-18)
Researchers confirm the validity of xenographic models for studies of methylation
Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), published today in Molecular Cancer Research a study where they identify methylation patterns associated with different subtypes of breast cancer, and a subclassification of the group of ''triple negatives'', a breast cancer type typically associated with poor prognosis. (2019-07-18)
A new spin on DNA
For decades, researchers have chased ways to study biological machines. (2019-07-17)
Slug, a stem cell regulator, keeps breast cells healthy by promoting repair of DNA damage
A new biomedical research study finds a transcription factor called Slug contributes to breast cell fitness by promoting efficient repair of DNA damage. (2019-07-16)
DNA replication machinery captured at atom-level detail
Life depends on double-stranded DNA unwinding and separating into single strands that can be copied for cell division. (2019-07-15)
Study gives insight into sun-induced DNA damage and cell repair
A team led by a Baylor University researcher has published a breakthrough article that provides a better understanding of the dynamic process by which sunlight-induced DNA damage is recognized by the molecular repair machinery in cells as needing repair. (2019-07-14)
Ancient epigenetic changes silence cancer-linked genes
A study in zebrafish indicates that some genes linked to cancers in humans have been strictly regulated throughout evolution. (2019-07-11)
How DNA outside cells can be targeted to prevent the spread of cancer
Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is DNA found in trace amounts in blood, which has escaped degradation by enzymes. (2019-07-11)
UBC scientists capture images of gene-editing enzymes in action
For the first time, scientists have captured high-resolution, three-dimensional images of an enzyme in the process of precisely cutting DNA strands. (2019-07-08)
Cancer cells will become vulnerable
Researchers from HSE University (The Higher School of Economics) have used machine learning to discover that the two most widespread DNA structures -- stem-loops and quadruplexes -- cause genome mutations that lead to cancer. (2019-07-08)
First hi-res images of active CRISPR enzyme will help improve genome editing
For the first time, scientists grappling with how to improve the efficiency of CRISPR technology -- a gene-editing platform that uses an enzyme called Cas9 to precisely cut and edit specific sequences of DNA within a live cell -- have captured atomic-level, three-dimensional images of the enzyme before and after cutting the DNA. (2019-07-08)
Discovery of mechanism behind precision cancer drug opens door for more targeted treatment
New research that uncovers the mechanism behind the newest generation of cancer drugs is opening the door for better targeted therapy. (2019-07-04)
Mechanism behind low cancer occurrence in bats signals potential treatment strategies for humans
Researchers from Duke-NUS Medical School have uncovered a potential mechanism behind cancer suppression in bats that may lead to future therapies for human cancers. (2019-07-03)
DNA from tooth in Florida man's foot solves 25-year-old shark bite mystery
In 2018, a Florida man found a piece of tooth embedded in his foot from a shark bite off Flagler Beach 24 years earlier. (2019-07-02)
Researchers clock DNA's recovery time after chemotherapy
A team of researchers led by Nobel laureate Aziz Sancar found that DNA damaged by the widely used chemotherapy drug cisplatin is mostly good as new in noncancerous tissue within two circadian cycles, or two days. (2019-07-01)
Artificial DNA can control release of active ingredients from drugs
A drug with three active ingredients that are released in sequence at specific times: Thanks to the work of a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), what was once a pharmacologist's dream is now much closer to reality. (2019-06-28)
Researchers discriminate between mutations that promote cancer growth and those that don't
Until now, researchers believed recurrent mutations (hotspot mutations) in cancer tumors were the important mutations (driver mutations) that promoted cancer progression. (2019-06-27)
What made humans 'the fat primate'?
How did humans get to be so much fatter than our closest primate relatives, despite sharing 99% of the same DNA? (2019-06-26)
Ancient DNA analysis adds chapter to the story of neanderthal migrations
After managing to obtain DNA from two 120,000-year-old European Neandertals, researchers report that these specimens are more genetically similar to Neandertals that lived in Europe 80,000 year later than they are to a Neandertal of similar age found in Siberia. (2019-06-26)
Applying the Goldilocks principle to DNA structure
Inspired by ideas from the physics of phase transitions and polymer physics, researchers in the Divisions of Physical and Biological Sciences at UC San Diego set out to determine the organization of DNA inside the nucleus of a living cell. (2019-06-24)
A study from IRB Barcelona describes the reaction mechanism of DNAzymes
Modesto Orozco's lab (IRB Barcelona) has published a study on the reaction mechanism of DNAzymes in Nature Catalysis. (2019-06-20)
Researchers develop a new, non-optical way to visualize DNA, cells, and tissues
Researchers have come up with a new way to image cell populations and their genetic contents. (2019-06-20)
A chemical approach to imaging cells from the inside
A team of researchers has developed a new technique for mapping cells. (2019-06-20)
'DNA microscopy' offers entirely new way to image cells
Rather than relying on optics, the microscopy system offers a chemically encoded way to map biomolecules' relative positions. (2019-06-20)
Electron-behaving nanoparticles rock current understanding of matter
Northwestern University researchers have made a strange and startling discovery that nanoparticles engineered with DNA in colloidal crystals -- when extremely small -- behave just like electrons. (2019-06-20)
Origin of life - A prebiotic route to DNA
DNA, the hereditary material, may have appeared on Earth earlier than has been assumed hitherto. (2019-06-18)
Dark centers of chromosomes reveal ancient DNA
Geneticists exploring the dark heart of the human genome have discovered big chunks of Neanderthal and other ancient DNA. (2019-06-18)
Uncovering hidden protein structures
Combining research-oriented teaching and interdisciplinary collaboration pays off: Researchers at the University of Konstanz develop a novel spectroscopic approach to investigate hitherto difficult-to-observe protein structures. (2019-06-18)
RNR 'switch' offers hope in battling antibiotic resistant bacteria
New research from Cornell University offers a new pathway for targeting pathogens in the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria. (2019-06-17)
A rapid, easy-to-use DNA amplification method at 37°C
Scientists in Japan have developed a way of amplifying DNA on a scale suitable for use in the emerging fields of DNA-based computing and molecular robotics. (2019-06-14)
Researchers identify traits linked to better outcomes in HPV-linked head and neck cancer
University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers identified characteristics that could be used to personalize treatment for patients with a type of head and neck cancer linked to HPV infection. (2019-06-14)
New gene editor harnesses jumping genes for precise DNA integration
Scientists at Columbia have developed a gene-editing tool -- using jumping genes -- that inserts any DNA sequence into the genome without cutting, fixing a major shortcoming of existing CRISPR technology. (2019-06-12)
From face to DNA: New method aims to improve match between DNA sample and face database
Predicting what someone's face looks like based on a DNA sample remains a hard nut to crack for science. (2019-06-11)
New microneedle technique speeds plant disease detection
Researchers have developed a new technique that uses microneedle patches to collect DNA from plant tissues in one minute, rather than the hours needed for conventional techniques. (2019-06-10)
The cholera bacterium's 3-in-1 toolkit for life in the ocean
The cholera bacterium uses a grappling hook-like appendage to take up DNA, bind to nutritious surfaces and recognize 'family' members, EPFL scientists have found. (2019-06-10)
DNA base editing induces substantial off-target RNA mutations
Researchers from Dr. YANG Hui's Lab at the Institute of Neuroscience of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and collaborators from the CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology of CAS and Sichuan University demonstrated that DNA base editors generated tens of thousands of off-target RNA single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and these off-target SNVs could be eliminated by introducing point mutations to the deaminases. (2019-06-10)
Drug makes tumors more susceptible to chemo
Researchers at MIT and Duke University have discovered a potential drug compound that can block a mutagenic DNA repair pathway that helps cancer cells survive chemotherapy. (2019-06-06)
Maternal blood test is effective for Down syndrome screening in twin pregnancies
Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing, which involves analyzing fetal DNA in a maternal blood sample, is a noninvasive and highly accurate test for Down syndrome in singleton pregnancies, but its effectiveness in twin pregnancies has been unclear. (2019-06-05)
The bacteria building your baby
Australian researchers have laid to rest a longstanding controversy: is the womb sterile? (2019-06-05)
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