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Current Dolphins News and Events

Current Dolphins News and Events, Dolphins News Articles.
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15-foot-long skeleton of extinct dolphin suggests parallel evolution among whales
A report in the journal Current Biology on July 9 offers a detailed description of the first nearly complete skeleton of an extinct large dolphin, discovered in what is now South Carolina. (2020-07-09)
Animals who try to sound 'bigger' are good at learning sounds
Some animals fake their body size by sounding 'bigger' than they actually are. (2020-07-08)
Dolphins learn foraging skills from peers
Dolphins can learn new skills from their fellow dolphins. That's the conclusion of a new study reported in the journal Current Biology on June 25. (2020-06-25)
Shelling out for dinner -- Dolphins learn foraging skills from peers
Dolphins use empty gastropod shells to trap prey. A new study demonstrates for the first time that dolphins can learn this foraging technique outside the mother-calf bond - showing that they have a similar cultural nature to great apes. (2020-06-25)
Dolphins learn in similar ways to great apes
Dolphins learn new foraging techniques not just from their mothers, but also from their peers, a study by the University of Zurich has found. (2020-06-25)
Good night? Satellite data uncovers dolphins on the move at nighttime
More than 1,000 bottlenose dolphins live in Florida's Indian River Lagoon year-round. (2020-06-02)
'Pingers' could save porpoises from fishing nets
Underwater sound devices called 'pingers' could be an effective, long-term way to prevent porpoises getting caught in fishing nets with no negative behavioural effects, newly published research suggests. (2020-05-13)
Last supper: Fish use sharp barbs and spines to fight off hungry seals
Research by Australia's Monash University reveals the steep price some marine mammals are willing to pay for food, after a stranded fur seal was discovered with more than a dozen facial wounds inflicted by its seafood prey. (2020-05-04)
Tuning into dolphin chatter could boost conservation efforts
Researchers from Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Australia and Curtin University have moved an important step closer to using sound rather than sight to track individual dolphin activity. (2020-04-29)
Cooperative male dolphins match the tempo of each other's calls
When it comes to working together, male dolphins coordinate their behavior just like us. (2020-03-31)
Neanderthals ate mussels, fish, and seals too
Over 80,000 years ago, Neanderthals fed themselves on mussels, fish and other marine life. (2020-03-26)
'Sushi parasites' have increased 283-fold in past 40 years
A new study led by the University of Washington finds dramatic increases in the abundance of a worm that can be transmitted to humans who eat raw or undercooked seafood. (2020-03-19)
Lehigh University engineers unlock secrets to swimming efficiency of whales, dolphins
Lehigh University MechE professor Keith Moored is PI on a recent Journal of the Royal Society Interface paper on work examining the fluid mechanics of cetacean propulsion by numerically simulating their oscillating tail fins. (2020-03-19)
HKU scientists find high concentrations of toxic phenyltin compounds in local Chinese white dolphins
An HKU research team confirmed the occurrence of biomagnification of toxic substance TPT compounds along the marine food chain resulted in very high concentrations of TPT in two top predators, the Chinese white dolphin and the finless porpoises. (2020-03-13)
Deep-sea coral gardens discovered in the submarine canyons off south Western Australia
Stunning 'gardens' of deep-sea corals have been discovered in the Bremer Canyon Marine Park by Australian and international scientists during an oceanographic expedition aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's R/V Falkor. (2020-02-28)
Bumblebees recognize objects through sight and touch, a complex cognitive feat
Demonstrating an unprecedented degree of cognitive complexity in an insect, researchers report that bumblebees are capable of recognizing objects across senses. (2020-02-20)
Boom and bust for ancient sea dragons
A new study by scientists from the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences, shows a well-known group of extinct marine reptiles had an early burst in their diversity and evolution - but that a failure to adapt in the long-run may have led to their extinction. (2020-02-13)
Dolphins gather in female family groups
Social clusters including mothers' groups play an important role in the life of southern Australian bottlenose dolphins, a new study shows. (2020-02-10)
Technique allows dolphin pregnancy exams to mirror those in humans
In a groundbreaking study just published in Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound, scientists have developed a new ultrasound technique for evaluating dolphin fetuses at all stages of gestation. (2020-01-10)
A 'pivotal' moment for understanding whale evolution
We could be getting closer to understanding how feeding behaviors in whales and dolphins have evolved over time. (2020-01-09)
Consider marine life when implementing offshore renewable power
With countries adopting green energy practices, renewable energy now accounts for a third of the world's power. (2019-12-17)
Lights on fishing nets save turtles and dolphins
Placing lights on fishing nets reduces the chances of sea turtles and dolphins being caught by accident, new research shows. (2019-12-05)
Early dispersal for quadrupedal cetaceans: amphibious whale from middle Eocene
Lead author, Olivier Lambert, Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Bruxelles, Belgium, presented the team's findings at this year's annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology held this year in Brisbane, Australia. (2019-11-08)
Fish simulations provide new insights into energy costs of swimming
A new computational analysis suggests that maximizing swimming speeds while minimizing energy costs depends on an optimal balance between a fish's muscle dynamics and the way its size, shape, and swimming motion affect its movement through water. (2019-10-31)
Lend me a flipper
Researchers at Kyoto University's Primate Research Institute, Kindai University, and Kagoshima City Aquarium investigated the cooperative abilities of dolphins. (2019-10-28)
Stanford scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate
Insect-eating bats navigate effortlessly in the dark and dolphins and killer whales gobble up prey in murky waters thanks in part to specific changes in a set of 18 genes involved in the development of the cochlear ganglion -- a group of nerves that transmit sound from the ear to the brain, according to a study by researchers at Stanford University. (2019-10-03)
Genes 'lost' in whales and dolphins helped their ancestors transition to life underwater
When cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) transitioned from life on land to life in the sea about 50 million years ago, 85 genes became inactivated in these species, according to a new study. (2019-09-25)
Antibiotic resistance surges in dolphins, mirroring humans
Scientists obtained a total of 733 pathogen isolates from 171 individual wild Bottlenose dolphins in Florida and found that the overall prevalence of resistance to at least one antibiotic for the 733 isolates was 88.2%. (2019-09-15)
Environment: Pollutants found in skin and blubber of English Channel dolphins
High levels of pollutants, such as industrial fluids and mercury, may have accumulated in the blubber and skin of one of the largest coastal populations of dolphins in Europe, a study in Scientific Reports indicates. (2019-09-12)
Hear them roar: How humans and chickadees understand each other
Is there something universal about the sounds we make that allows vocal learners -- like songbirds -- to figure out how we're feeling? (2019-07-12)
CNIO researchers discover that the rate of telomere shortening predicts species lifespan
Comparison of telomeres of goats, dolphins, gulls, reindeer, vultures, flamingos, elephants, mice and humans reveals that species whose telomeres shorten faster have shorter lives. (2019-07-08)
Sea otters have low genetic diversity like other threatened species, biologists report
Sea otters have very low genetic diversity, a UCLA-led team of life scientists reports June 18 in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. (2019-06-18)
Dolphins form friendships through shared interests just like us, study finds
When it comes to making friends, it appears dolphins are just like us and form close friendships with other dolphins that have a common interest. (2019-06-11)
New sub-species of pilot whale identified in Pacific Ocean
Short-finned pilot whales are found over a wide swath of the world's oceans, with habitats in the Indian, and Pacific, and North Atlantic oceans. (2019-06-03)
Baby tiger sharks eat songbirds
Tiger sharks have a reputation for being the 'garbage cans of the sea' -- they'll eat just about anything, from dolphins and sea turtles to rubber tires. (2019-05-21)
Flamingoes, elephants and sharks: How do blind adults learn about animal appearance?
They've never seen animals like hippos and sharks but adults born blind have rich insight into what they look like, a new Johns Hopkins University study found. (2019-05-21)
Dolphin ancestor's hearing was more like hoofed mammals than today's sea creatures
The CT scan revealed cochlear coiling with more turns than in animals with echolocation, indicating hearing more similar to the cloven-hoofed, terrestrial mammals dolphins came from than the sleek sea creatures they are today. (2019-05-14)
Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication
The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil was thought to be solitary with little social structure that would require communication. (2019-04-19)
Hello, kitty: Cats recognize their own names, according to new Japanese research
Pet cats can recognize their own names if their names are used regularly by their owners, according to new results by a team of researchers in Japan. (2019-04-07)
New insights on the form and function of the dolphin clitoris
For the first time, researchers offer an up-close look at the clitoris of female dolphins along with insights on the potential for the animals to experience sexual pleasure. (2019-04-06)
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