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Current Dolphins News and Events

Current Dolphins News and Events, Dolphins News Articles.
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Environment: Pollutants found in skin and blubber of English Channel dolphins
High levels of pollutants, such as industrial fluids and mercury, may have accumulated in the blubber and skin of one of the largest coastal populations of dolphins in Europe, a study in Scientific Reports indicates. (2019-09-12)
Hear them roar: How humans and chickadees understand each other
Is there something universal about the sounds we make that allows vocal learners -- like songbirds -- to figure out how we're feeling? (2019-07-12)
CNIO researchers discover that the rate of telomere shortening predicts species lifespan
Comparison of telomeres of goats, dolphins, gulls, reindeer, vultures, flamingos, elephants, mice and humans reveals that species whose telomeres shorten faster have shorter lives. (2019-07-08)
Sea otters have low genetic diversity like other threatened species, biologists report
Sea otters have very low genetic diversity, a UCLA-led team of life scientists reports June 18 in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. (2019-06-18)
Dolphins form friendships through shared interests just like us, study finds
When it comes to making friends, it appears dolphins are just like us and form close friendships with other dolphins that have a common interest. (2019-06-11)
New sub-species of pilot whale identified in Pacific Ocean
Short-finned pilot whales are found over a wide swath of the world's oceans, with habitats in the Indian, and Pacific, and North Atlantic oceans. (2019-06-03)
Baby tiger sharks eat songbirds
Tiger sharks have a reputation for being the 'garbage cans of the sea' -- they'll eat just about anything, from dolphins and sea turtles to rubber tires. (2019-05-21)
Flamingoes, elephants and sharks: How do blind adults learn about animal appearance?
They've never seen animals like hippos and sharks but adults born blind have rich insight into what they look like, a new Johns Hopkins University study found. (2019-05-21)
Dolphin ancestor's hearing was more like hoofed mammals than today's sea creatures
The CT scan revealed cochlear coiling with more turns than in animals with echolocation, indicating hearing more similar to the cloven-hoofed, terrestrial mammals dolphins came from than the sleek sea creatures they are today. (2019-05-14)
Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication
The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil was thought to be solitary with little social structure that would require communication. (2019-04-19)
Hello, kitty: Cats recognize their own names, according to new Japanese research
Pet cats can recognize their own names if their names are used regularly by their owners, according to new results by a team of researchers in Japan. (2019-04-07)
New insights on the form and function of the dolphin clitoris
For the first time, researchers offer an up-close look at the clitoris of female dolphins along with insights on the potential for the animals to experience sexual pleasure. (2019-04-06)
Ancient, four-legged whale with otter-like features found along the coast of Peru
Cetaceans, the group including whales and dolphins, originated in south Asia more than 50 million years ago from a small, four-legged, hoofed ancestor. (2019-04-04)
Jurassic crocodile discovery sheds light on reptiles' family tree
A 150 million-year-old fossil has been identified as a previously unseen species of ancient crocodile that developed a tail fin and paddle-like limbs for life in the sea. (2019-04-04)
Climate change threat to dolphins' survival
An unprecedented marine heatwave had long-lasting negative impacts on both survival and birth rates on the iconic dolphin population in Shark Bay, Western Australia. (2019-04-01)
Stranded dolphins have amyloid plaques in their brains
Dolphins stranded on the beaches of Florida and Massachusetts show in their brains amyloid plaques, a hallmark in human beings of Alzheimer's disease, together with an environmental toxin produced by cyanobacterial blooms. (2019-03-26)
Unprecedented number of warm-water species moved northward during marine heatwave
A UC Davis study documents an unprecedented number of southern marine species moving northward into California and as far north as Oregon during the 2014-2016 marine heatwave. (2019-03-12)
Scientists put ichthyosaurs in virtual water tanks
Using computer simulations and 3D models, paleontologists from the University of Bristol have uncovered more detail on how Mesozoic sea dragons swam. (2019-03-05)
Male bottlenose dolphins form bachelor groups with their relatives
New research has analysed the behaviour of 12 dolphin social groups in South Australia's Coffin Bay region and shows males who team up in groups of two to five to form beneficial alliances may have more success. (2019-03-05)
Radio-tracking dolphins reveals intimate details about their behavior
The most extensive radio-tracking effort of bottlenose dolphins in the Indian River Lagoon using radio-telemetry reveals new and surprising information about how they use their habitats, how they spend their time, and how they interact with their own species. (2019-02-21)
Giant 'megalodon' shark extinct earlier than previously thought
'Megalodon' -- a giant predatory shark that has inspired numerous documentaries, books and blockbuster movies -- likely went extinct at least one million years earlier than previously thought, according to new research published Feb. (2019-02-13)
Plastic in Britain's seals, dolphins and whales
Microplastics have been found in the guts of every marine mammal examined in a new study of animals washed up on Britain's shores. (2019-01-31)
UH marine mammal research captures rare video of newborn humpback whale
A rare video, captured by the University of Hawaii at Manoa's Marine Mammal Research Program (MMRP) in January 2019 shows a humpback whale calf so new that its dorsal fin and tail flukes appear soft and flimsy, and its mother is still excreting blood, while sometimes supporting the calf on her back. (2019-01-31)
In polar regions, warm-blooded marine predators rule
Even though diversity typically decreases from the tropics to the poles, in the frigid waters of the high latitudes, warm-blooded marine mammals and birds thrive, both in number and species richness. (2019-01-24)
Fifty years of decline in Queensland's coastal sharks
Queensland's coastal shark numbers are continuing a 50-year decline, in sharp contradiction of suggestions of 'exploding' shark populations, according to an analysis of Queensland Shark Control Program data. (2018-12-13)
Skin game
Medical University of Vienna professor Leopold Eckhart and colleagues have performed one of the largest comparative genomic studies to help determine the key molecular and evolutionary origins of mammalian adaptations seen in skin proteins. (2018-12-13)
Remarkably preserved fossil sea reptile reveals skin that is still soft
The remains of an 180 million-year-old ichthyosaur (literally 'fish-lizard') have been analysed, and the fossil is so well-preserved that its soft-tissues retain some of their original pliability. (2018-12-06)
Parrot genome analysis reveals insights into longevity, cognition
Parrots are famously talkative, and a blue-fronted Amazon parrot named Moises -- or at least its genome -- is telling scientists volumes about the longevity and highly developed cognitive abilities that give parrots so much in common with humans. (2018-12-06)
Technique inspired by dolphin chirps could improve tests of soft materials
MIT engineers have devised a technique that vastly improves on the speed and accuracy of measuring soft materials' properties. (2018-12-05)
Microplastics found in all sea turtle species
Tests on more than 100 sea turtles -- spanning three oceans and all seven species -- have revealed microplastics in the guts of every single turtle. (2018-12-04)
A bigger nose, a bigger bang: Size matters for ecoholocating toothed whales
A new study sheds light on how toothed whales adapted their sonar abilities to occupy different environments. (2018-11-15)
Bats vs. dolphins -- the ultimate battle of sonar systems
To find ways to improve man-made active sensing, scientists worldwide study the sonar systems of bats and dolphins. (2018-11-06)
Growing noise in the ocean can cause dolphins to change their calls
Noise levels in the world's oceans are on the rise, but little is known about its impact on marine mammals like dolphins that rely on sound for communication. (2018-10-24)
Evolutionary 'arms race' -- how dolphins and whales fight disease threats
A groundbreaking study reveals how dolphins, whales and other cetaceans compete for survival in an evolutionary 'arms race' with changing pathogenic threats like mercury and brevotoxin (e.g. (2018-10-10)
A pheromone-sensing gene that predates land-dwelling vertebrates
Scientists at Tokyo Tech have discovered a gene that appears to play a vital role in pheromone sensing. (2018-10-09)
The persistent killer of killer whales
Despite their being banned for decades, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) threaten the long-term viability of more than 50 percent of the planet's killer whale population, reports a new model-based study. (2018-09-27)
Aerial survey reveals great diversity & abundance in NE Canyons Marine National Monument
Airborne marine biologists were amazed by the sheer abundance and diversity of large marine wildlife in their recent aerial survey of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, the only marine national monument on the East Coast, about 150 southeast of Cape Cod. (2018-09-13)
Endocrine disruptors found in bottlenose dolphins
Evidence of exposure to phthalates, chemical compounds used in hundreds of consumer products, has been found in resident bottlenose dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida. (2018-09-05)
Fossil teeth show how Jurassic reptiles adapted to changing seas
Marine predators that lived in deep waters during the Jurassic Period thrived as sea levels rose, while species that dwelled in the shallows died out, research suggests. (2018-09-04)
Marine mammals lack functional gene to defend against popular pesticide
As marine mammals evolved to make water their primary habitat, they lost the ability to make a protein that defends humans and other land-dwelling mammals from the neurotoxic effects of a popular man-made pesticide. (2018-08-09)
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