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Current Driving News and Events, Driving News Articles.
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Car passengers can reduce pollution risk by closing windows and changing route
Drivers and passengers can inhale significantly lower levels of air pollution by setting their vehicle's ventilation systems more effectively and taking a 'cleaner' route to their destination, a new study reveals. (2020-08-11)
Drivers respond to pre-crash warnings with levels of attentive 'gaze'
Engineers at the University of Missouri conducted open road testing of three collision avoidance systems and demonstrated that a drivers' visual behavior in response to an alert generated from a collision avoidance system can be divided into one of four different behavioral categories: active gaze, self-conscious gaze, attentive gaze and ignored gaze. (2020-08-05)
Should you really be behind the wheel after concussion?
Even after all of their symptoms are gone, people who have had a concussion take longer to regain complex reaction times, the kind you need in most real-life driving situations on the road, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Virtual Conference from July 31 to August 1, 2020. (2020-07-29)
Gene variations at birth reveal origins of inflammation and immune disease
A study published in the journal Nature Communications has pinpointed a number of areas of the human genome that may help explain the neonatal origins of chronic immune and inflammatory diseases of later life, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and coeliac disease. (2020-07-28)
Software of autonomous driving systems
Researchers at TU Graz and AVL focus on software systems of autonomous driving systems. (2020-07-23)
Commentary in Pediatrics: Children don't transmit Covid-19, schools should reopen in fall
Based on one new and three recent studies, the authors of this commentary in Pediatrics conclude that children rarely transmit Covid-19, either among themselves or to adults. (2020-07-10)
Chatbots can ease medical providers' burden, offer guidance to those with COVID-19 symptoms
COVID-19 has placed tremendous pressure on health care systems, not only for critical care but also from an anxious public looking for answers. (2020-07-09)
As teens delay driver licensing, they miss key safety instruction
Teens are getting licensed to drive later than they used to and missing critical safety training as a result, according to Yale researchers. (2020-07-07)
Women significantly more likely to be prescribed opioids, study shows
Women are significantly more likely to receive prescriptions of opioid analgesics. (2020-06-29)
CMU method makes more data available for training self-driving cars
For safety's sake, a self-driving car must accurately track the movement of pedestrians, bicycles and other vehicles around it. (2020-06-17)
Self-driving cars that recognize free space can better detect objects
It's important that self-driving cars quickly detect other cars or pedestrians sharing the road. (2020-06-11)
Efficient generation of relativistic near-single-cycle mid-infrared pulses in plasmas
Intense few-cycle optical pulses in the mid-infrared region are of great importance yet difficult to obtain with normal optical materials and techniques. (2020-05-25)
Algorithmic autos
Connected and automated vehicles use technology such as sensors, cameras and advanced control algorithms to adjust their operation to changing conditions with little or no input from drivers. (2020-05-19)
Car sharing minus the driver
In 15 years, the share of self-driving passenger vehicles on Moscow's roads will exceed 60%. (2020-05-06)
Study shows senior drivers prefer watching videos to learn driver assistance technologies
Most vehicles today come with their fair share of bells and whistles, ranging from adaptive cruise-control features to back-up cameras. (2020-04-22)
Is autoimmunity on the rise?
A study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology provides evidence that the prevalence of autoimmunity -- when the immune system goes awry and attacks the body itself -- has increased in the United States in recent years. (2020-04-08)
Men pose more risk to other road users than women
Men pose more risk to other road users than women do and they are more likely to drive more dangerous vehicles, reveals the first study of its kind, published online in the journal Injury Prevention. (2020-04-06)
Representation of driving behavior as a statistical model
A joint research team from Toyohashi University of Technology has established a method to represent driving behaviors and their changes that differ among drivers in a single statistical model, taking into account the effect of various external factors such as road structure. (2020-04-02)
System trains driverless cars in simulation before they hit the road
A simulation system invented at MIT to train driverless cars creates a photorealistic world with infinite steering possibilities, helping the cars learn to navigate a host of worse-case scenarios before cruising down real streets. (2020-03-23)
Self-driving car trajectory tracking gets closer to human-driver ideal
Have you taken an Uber ride and disagreed with the 'fastest' route that the GPS app suggested because you or the driver know a 'better' way? (2020-03-05)
Stimulating resonance with two very different forces
In some specialised oscillators, two driving forces with significantly different frequencies can work together to make the whole system resonate. (2020-02-25)
APS tip sheet: Listening to bursting bubbles
Sound signatures from violent fluid events, like bubbles bursting, can be used to measure forces at work during these events. (2020-02-24)
KIST researchers develop high-capacity EV battery materials that double driving range
Dr. Hun-Gi Jung and his research team at the Center for Energy Storage Research of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology have announced the development of silicon anode materials that can increase battery capacity four-fold in comparison to graphite anode materials and enable rapid charging to more than 80% capacity in only five minutes. (2020-02-21)
Uber linked to a reduction in serious road traffic injuries in the UK
A study by University of Oxford researchers, published today in Social Science & Medicine, has found that ride-hailing provider, Uber, is associated with a 9% decline in serious road accident injuries in the UK. (2020-02-18)
BU Study: State alcohol laws focus on drunk driving; they could do much more
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds a substantial increase in the number and strength of state laws to reduce impaired driving over the last 20 years, while laws to reduce excessive drinking remained unchanged. (2020-02-13)
Autonomous vehicle technology may improve safety for US Army convoys, report says
US Army convoys could be made safer for soldiers by implementing autonomous vehicle technology to reduce the number of service members needed to operate the vehicles, according to a new study from the RAND Corporation. (2020-02-12)
Teens with a history of ADHD need stronger monitoring of health risks
Researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) wanted to better understand how primary care doctors addressed risks with ADHD patients as they transitioned from childhood to young adulthood. (2020-02-11)
Increased traffic injuries are a surprising result of restricting older drivers
Research from Japan's University of Tsukuba examined impacts of mandated cognitive testing at driver's license renewal for people aged 75+. (2020-02-05)
Scientists identify new genetic drivers of cancer
Analysis of whole cancer genomes gives key insights into the role of the non-coding genome in cancer. (2020-02-05)
Nanotechnology: Putting a nanomachine to work
A team of chemists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich has successfully coupled the directed motion of a light-activated molecular motor to a different chemical unit -- thus taking an important step toward the realization of synthetic nanomachines. (2020-01-30)
Autonomous vehicles could benefit health if cars are electric and shared
A new ISGlobal study analyzes the potential health impact of self-driving cars -- the transport of the future. (2020-01-30)
Owners of high-status cars are on a collision course with traffic
Self-centred men who are argumentative, stubborn, disagreeable and unempathetic are much more likely to own a high-status car. (2020-01-29)
Algorithm turns cancer gene discovery on its head
Prediction method could help personalize cancer treatments and reveal new drug targets. (2020-01-20)
Impaired driving -- even once the high wears off
McLean researchers have discovered that recreational marijuana use affects driving ability even when users are not intoxicated. (2020-01-14)
Who's liable? The AV or the human driver?
Researchers at Columbia Engineering and Columbia Law School have developed a joint fault-based liability rule that can be used to regulate both self-driving car manufacturers and human drivers. (2020-01-14)
Yale-led team finds parents can curb teen drinking and driving
Binge drinking by teenagers in their senior year of high school is a strong predictor of dangerous behaviors later in life, including driving while impaired (DWI) and riding with an impaired driver (RWI), according to a new Yale-led study. (2020-01-13)
Broad support needed to maximize impact of cars designed for kids with mobility issues
For families who use the modified ride-on cars to help young children with mobility issues develop self-guided exploration and socialization, researcher Sam Logan found that robust support is needed to ensure the cars actually get used, rather than being forgotten in a closet. (2020-01-13)
Cultural evolution caused broad-scale historical declines of large mammals across China
Researchers from Aarhus University and Nanjing University have shown that cultural evolution overshadowed climate change in driving historical broad-scale megafauna dynamics across China. (2019-12-23)
Underwater pile driving noise causes alarm responses in squid
Exposure to underwater pile driving noise, which can be associated with the construction of docks, piers, and offshore wind farms, causes squid to exhibit strong alarm behaviors, according to a study by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) researchers published Dec. (2019-12-16)
Smart intersections could cut autonomous car congestion
A new study by Cornell researchers developed a first-of-its-kind model to control traffic and intersections in order to increase autonomous car capacity on urban streets of the future, reduce congestion and minimize accidents. (2019-12-16)
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