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Current Drought News and Events

Current Drought News and Events, Drought News Articles.
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NASA, University of Nebraska release new global groundwater maps
NASA researchers have developed new satellite-based, weekly global maps of soil moisture and groundwater wetness conditions. (2020-03-31)
Changing forests
As the climate is changing, so too are the world's forests. (2020-03-30)
Under extreme heat and drought, trees hardly benefit from an increased CO2 level
The increase in the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere does not compensate the negative effect of greenhouse gas-induced climate change on trees: The more extreme drought and heat become, the less do trees profit from the increased supply with carbon dioxide in terms of carbon metabolism and water use efficiency. (2020-03-26)
The right dose of geoengineering could reduce climate change risks
Injecting the right dose of sulphur dioxide into Earth's upper atmosphere to thicken the layer of light reflecting aerosol particles artificially could reduce the effects of climate change overall, exacerbating change in only a small fraction of places, according to new research by UCL and Harvard. (2020-03-19)
Sensitivity to low flow
Researchers are using a new method to determine how resistant rivers are to drought. (2020-03-04)
Colorado river flow dwindles due to loss of reflective snowpack
Due to the disappearance of its sunlight-reflecting seasonal snowpack, the Colorado River Basin is losing more water to evaporation than can be replaced by precipitation, researchers report. (2020-02-20)
In killifish: Diapause protects life from normal consequences of aging
Studying the African turquoise killifish, which enters into a suspended state called 'diapause' during dry and unfavorable growing seasons, researchers uncovered mechanisms that allow the arrested fish to be maintained for long periods while being protected from the normal consequences of aging. (2020-02-20)
Silica increases water availability for plants
As a result of climate change, more frequent and longer drought periods are predicted in the future. (2020-02-12)
Local genetic adaption helps sorghum crop hide from witchweed
Sorgum crops in areas where the parasite witchweed is common have locally adapted to have mutations in a particular gene, which helps the plant resist the parasite. (2020-02-11)
New research shows that El Niño contributes to insect collapse in the Amazon
Hotter and drier El Niño events are having an alarming effect on biodiversity in the Amazon Rainforest and further add to a disturbing global insect collapse, scientists show. (2020-02-09)
NYU scientists sequence the genome of basmati rice
Using an innovative genome sequencing technology, researchers assembled the complete genetic blueprint of two basmati rice varieties, including one that is drought-tolerant and resistant to bacterial disease. (2020-02-05)
Putting a finger on plant stress response
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that a PHD zinc finger-like domain in SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 is essential for protein function in Arabidopsis. (2020-02-05)
Climate change affects soil health
Climate change is affecting the health of agricultural soils. Increased heat and drought make life easy for the pathogenic fungus Pythium ultimum. (2020-02-03)
Fungal decisions can affect climate
Research shows fungi may slow climate change by storing more carbon. (2020-01-29)
Microscopic partners could help plants survive stressful environments
Tiny, symbiotic fungi play an outsized role in helping plants survive stresses like drought and extreme temperatures, which could help feed a planet experiencing climate change, report scientists at Washington State University. (2020-01-29)
Getting to the root of plant survival
In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have been able to identify hormones and proteins that interact to regulate root emergence. (2020-01-27)
Earth's most biodiverse ecosystems face a perfect storm
A combination of climate change, extreme weather and pressure from local human activity is causing a collapse in global biodiversity and ecosystems across the tropics, new research shows. (2020-01-26)
Warmer, dryer, browner
Climate hazard scientists connect 2018's Four Corners drought directly to human-caused climate change. (2020-01-23)
Platypus on brink of extinction
New UNSW research calls for national action to minimise the risk of the platypus vanishing due to habitat destruction, dams and weirs. (2020-01-21)
Scientists uncover how an explosion of new genes explain the origin of land plants
Scientists have made a significant discovery about the genetic origins of how plants evolved from living in water to land 470 million years ago. (2020-01-16)
Widespread droughts affect southern California water sources six times a century
A University of Arizona-led study used the annual growth rings of trees to reconstruct a long-term climate history and examine the duration and frequency of ''perfect droughts'' in Southern California's main water sources. (2020-01-13)
How do conifers survive droughts? Study points to existing roots, not new growth
As the world warms, a new study is helping scientists understand how coniferous forests may respond to drought. (2019-12-30)
Amazon forest regrowth much slower than previously thought
The regrowth of Amazonian forests following deforestation can happen much slower than previously thought, a new study shows. (2019-12-19)
Studies show integrated strategies work best for buffelgrass control
Buffelgrass is a drought-tolerant, invasive weed that threatens the biodiversity of native ecosystems in the drylands of the Americas and Australia. (2019-12-11)
Multi-species grassland mixtures increase yield stability, even under drought conditions
In a two-year experiment in Ireland and Switzerland, researchers found a positive relationship between plant diversity and yield stability in intensely managed grassland, even under experimental drought conditions. (2019-12-10)
Researchers find some forests crucial for climate change mitigation, biodiversity
Researchers have identified forests in the western United States that should be preserved for their potential to mitigate climate change through carbon sequestration, as well as to enhance biodiversity. (2019-12-09)
Breakthrough in battle against invasive plants
Plants that can 'bounce back' after disturbances like ploughing, flooding or drought are the most likely to be 'invasive' if they're moved to new parts of the world, scientists say. (2019-12-06)
Silverswords may be gone with the wind
In a new study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Monographs, researchers seek to understand recent population declines of Haleakalā silverswords and identify conservation strategies for the future. (2019-12-04)
Rural decline not driven by water recovery
New research from the University of Adelaide has shown that climate and economic factors are the main drivers of farmers leaving their properties in the Murray-Darling Basin, not reduced water for irrigation as commonly claimed. (2019-12-04)
Raising plants to withstand climate change
Success with improving a model plant's response to harsh conditions is leading plant molecular researchers to move to food crops including wheat, barley, rice and chickpeas. (2019-12-03)
Genomic gymnastics help sorghum plant survive drought
A new study provides the first detailed look at how the sorghum plant exercises exquisite control over its genome -- switching some genes on and some genes off at the first sign of water scarcity, and again when water returns -- to survive when its surroundings turn harsh and arid. (2019-12-02)
LANL news: Drought impact study shows new issues for plants and carbon dioxide
Extreme drought's impact on plants will become more dominant under future climate change, as noted in a paper out today in the journal Nature Climate Change. (2019-11-25)
Forests face climate change tug of war
Increased carbon dioxide allows plants to photosynthesize more and use less water. (2019-11-25)
What felled the great Assyrian Empire? A Yale professor weighs in
The Neo-Assyrian Empire, centered in northern Iraq and extending from Iran to Egypt -- the largest empire of its time -- collapsed after more than two centuries of dominance at the fall of its capital, Nineveh, in 612 B.C.E. (2019-11-14)
Climate change influenced rise and fall of Northern Iraq's Neo-Assyrian Empire
Changes in climate may have contributed to both the rise and collapse of the Neo-Assyrian Empire in northern Iraq, which was considered the most powerful empire of its time, according to a new study. (2019-11-13)
When reporting climate-driven human migration, place matters
Location matters when talking about how climate might or might not be driving migration from Central America. (2019-11-13)
Climate may have helped crumble one of the ancient world's most powerful civilizations
New research suggests it was climate-related drought that built the foundation for the collapse of the Assyrian Empire (whose heartland was based in today's northern Iraq)--one of the most powerful civilizations in the ancient world. (2019-11-13)
Rising grain prices in response to phased climatic change during 1736-1850 in the North China Plain
The links between climatic change and grain price anomalies in the North China Plain (NCP) during the Qing Dynasty were analyzed. (2019-11-11)
Solar and wind energy preserve groundwater for drought, agriculture
A Princeton University-led study in Nature Communications is among the first to show that solar and wind energy not only enhance drought resilience, but also aid in groundwater sustainability. (2019-11-06)
Switching to solar and wind will reduce groundwater use
IIASA researchers explored optimal pathways for managing groundwater and hydropower trade-offs for different water availability conditions as solar and wind energy start to play a more prominent role in the state of California. (2019-11-06)
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