Current Drought News and Events

Current Drought News and Events, Drought News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Tree rings capture an abrupt irreversible shift in east Asia's climate
The abrupt shift to hotter and drier conditions over inner East Asia is unprecedented and may herald an irreversible shift to a new climate regime for the region, according to a new study. (2020-11-26)

New wheat and barley genomes will help feed the world
An international research collaboration, including scientists from the University of Adelaide's Waite Research Institute, has unlocked new genetic variation in wheat and barley - a major boost for the global effort in breeding higher-yielding wheat and barley varieties. (2020-11-25)

Electromagnetic imaging reveals freshwater cache off Hawai'ian coast
Pointing toward a much-needed future reservoir of freshwater for the island of Hawai'i in the face of climate-driven drought, electromagnetic images of the island have revealed multilayered basalt, ash and soil formations that serve as a previously unknown conduit to move freshwater offshore to the submarine flank of the island. (2020-11-25)

Climate change and 'atmospheric thirst' to increase fire danger and drought in NV and CA
Climate change and a ''thirsty atmosphere'' will bring more extreme wildfire danger and multi-year droughts to Nevada and California by the end of this century, according to new research from the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and the University of California, Merced. (2020-11-19)

Predicting urban water needs
New Stanford research uses Zillow and census data combined with machine learning to identify residential water consumption based on housing characteristics. The approach could help cities better understand water use and design water-efficient communities. (2020-11-18)

Biological clock and extra gene pairs control important plant functions
New understanding of circadian rhythms could be key to stronger, drought-resistant crops in the face of climate change. (2020-11-05)

Archaeologists reveal human resilience in the face of climate change in ancient Turkey
An examination of two documented periods of climate change in the greater Middle East, between approximately 4,500 and 3,000 years ago, reveals local evidence of resilience and even of a flourishing ancient society despite the changes in climate seen in the larger region. The study demonstrates that human responses to climate change vary at the local level, and highlights how challenge and collapse in some areas were matched by resilience and opportunities elsewhere. (2020-10-29)

Expect more mega-droughts
Mega-droughts - droughts that last two decades or longer - are tipped to increase thanks to climate change, according to University of Queensland-led research. (2020-10-29)

Stanford researchers reveal US corn crop's growing sensitivity to drought
New management approaches and technology have allowed the US. Corn Belt to increase yields despite some changes in climate. However, soil sensitivity to drought has increased significantly, according to a new study that could help identify ways to reverse the trend. WATCH RELATED VIDEO: https://bit.ly/35rFgJ5 (2020-10-26)

Ancient lake contributed to past San Andreas fault ruptures
he San Andreas fault, which runs along the western coast of North America and crosses dense population centers like Los Angeles, California, is one of the most-studied faults in North America because of its significant hazard risk. Based on its roughly 150-year recurrence interval for magnitude 7.5 earthquakes and the fact that it's been over 300 years since that's happened, the southern San Andreas fault has long been called 'overdue' for such an earthquake. (2020-10-26)

Engineering drought-resistant crops with Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis
This work examines requirements for introducing CAM and alternative water-saving pathways into C3 plants in different environments. (2020-10-23)

Warm central equatorial pacific sea surface temperatures and anthropogenic warming boosted the 2019 severe drought in East China
A persistent severe drought occurred over East China along the Yangtze River in 2019 that lasted from August to October and caused large-scale negative impacts on lake water shortages and local agriculture. Results show that the central equatorial Pacific ENSO and anthropogenic warming were likely responsible for this drought event. (2020-10-14)

Human activity has made Murray estuary more vulnerable to drought
In drought prone Australia, it's largest river, the Murray is known to suffer acidification in its estuary in South Australia. For the first time a study has married geomorphology and environmental chemistry to gain a better understanding of how the lakes formed - and how they should be managed. (2020-10-14)

Thinning and prescribed fire treatments reduce tree mortality
Frequent fire once kept forests of California and throughout the western US relatively open but with a diversity of habitats preferred by a wide array of plant and animal species. After over a century of fire suppression, many such forests are now considerably denser, more homogeneous, and prone to disturbances such as stand-replacing wildfire and drought. (2020-10-14)

One-two punch
Drought is endemic to the American West along with heatwaves and intense wildfires. But scientists are only beginning to understand how the effects of multiple droughts can compound to affect forests differently than a single drought alone. (2020-10-12)

Atmospheric dust levels are rising in the Great Plains
A study finds that atmospheric dust levels are rising across the Great Plains at a rate of up to 5% per year. The trend of rising dust parallels expansion of cropland and even seasonal crop cycles. And if the Great Plains becomes drier, a possibility under climate change scenarios, then all the pieces are in place for a repeat of the Dust Bowl that devastated the Midwest in the 1930s. (2020-10-12)

The Colorado river's water supply is predictable owing to long-term ocean memory
A team of scientists at Utah State University has developed a new tool to forecast drought and water flow in the Colorado River several years in advance. Although the river's headwaters are in landlocked Wyoming and Colorado, water levels are linked to sea surface temperatures in parts of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and the water's long-term ocean memory. ''Colorado River water supply is predictable on multi-year timescales owing to long-term ocean memory'' was published in Communications Earth and Environment. (2020-10-09)

Droughts are threatening global wetlands: new study
University of Adelaide scientists have shown how droughts are threatening the health of wetlands globally. Published in the journal Earth-Science Reviews, the scientists highlight the many physical and chemical changes occurring during droughts that lead to severe, and sometimes irreversible, drying of wetland soils. (2020-10-09)

Climate patterns linked in Amazon, North and South America, study shows
University of Arkansas researchers developed a tree-ring chronology from the Amazon River basin that established a link between climate patterns in the Amazon and the Americas. (2020-10-09)

Redefining drought in the US corn belt
As the climate trends warmer and drier, global food security increasingly hinges on crops' ability to withstand drought. But are scientists and producers focusing on the right metric when measuring crop-relevant drought? Not exactly, according to new research from University of Illinois scientists, who urge the scientific community to redefine the term. (2020-09-29)

The cost of drought in Italy
Drought-induced economic losses ranged in Italy between 0.55 and 1.75 billion euros over the period 2001-2016, and droughts caused significant collateral effects not only on the agricultural sector, but also on food manufacturing industries. A study just published led by the CMCC Foundation sheds light on the characterization of the damages caused by droughts while providing a tool with applicability in the implementation of drought risk management plans and the evaluation of drought management policies. (2020-09-28)

Disastrous duo: Heatwaves and droughts
Simultaneous heatwaves and droughts are becoming increasingly common in western parts of the Unites States, according to a new study led by researchers from McGill University. Periods of dry and hot weather, which can make wildfires more likely, are becoming larger, more intense, and more frequent because of climate change. (2020-09-28)

Newly identified 'landfalling droughts' originate over ocean
Researchers have identified a new type of 'landfalling drought' that originates over the ocean before traveling onto land, and which can cause larger, drier conditions than other droughts. (2020-09-24)

Study shows impact of climate change on Neotropical freshwater ecosystems
Researchers from six countries in the Americas explored bromeliad microcosms, showing how drought and flood affect the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, especially at the bottom of the food chain. (2020-09-23)

Forest margins may be more resilient to climate change than previously thought
A warming climate and more frequent wildfires do not necessarily mean the western United States will see the forest loss that many scientists expect. Dry forest margins may be more resilient to climate change than previously thought if managed appropriately, according to Penn State researchers. (2020-09-22)

Ecological factors driving microbial community assembly in response to warming
Researchers from the OU Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology lead a study that aims to better understand ecological community assembly mechanisms in response to climate warming. (2020-09-22)

0.5°C of additional warming has a huge effect on global aridity
In a simulation study, UTokyo researchers showed that limiting global warming to 1.5°C rather than 2°C will mitigate aridification in some regions of the world including the Mediterranean, western Europe, and southern Africa. However, Australia and some parts of Asia were simulated to become wetter rather than drier at both 1.5°C and 2°C of warming. These findings reveal the importance of targeted regional simulations of aridity levels to support policymaking decisions on global warming targets. (2020-09-17)

Droughts in the Amazon rainforest can be predicted up to 18 months in advance
For the first time, it is possible to accurately predict severe drought up to 18 months in advance in Tropical South America. Early warnings of upcoming droughts are imperative for mitigating the impact on millions of people depending on the Amazon rainforest ecosystem. Additionally, droughts threaten the delicate ecosystems of the rainforest in South America. (2020-09-17)

Wildfire on the rise since 1984 in Northern California's coastal ranges
High-severity wildfires in northern coastal California have been increasing by about 10 percent per decade since 1984, according to a study from the University of California, Davis, that associates climate trends with wildfire. (2020-09-17)

Colorado's famous aspens expected to decline due to climate change
Using computer modeling, researchers simulated how the distribution of quaking aspen, a native tree known for its brilliant yellow and orange foliage in fall and the sound of its trembling leaves, will change amid rising temperatures over the next 100 years. (2020-09-16)

Food mechanics recipe to serve up healthy food that lasts
Researchers are investigating the science of food drying to design faster, cheaper and better ways to store food. (2020-09-13)

Wild cousins may help crops battle climate change
Wild relatives of our domestic crops already cope with harsh conditions and resist disease. Can we use them to help our preferred crops adapt? (2020-09-09)

Consequences of the 2018 summer drought
The drought that hit central and northern Europe in summer 2018 had serious effects on crops, forests and grasslands. Researchers from the European Research Infrastructure Integrated Carbon Observation System (ICOS), including researchers from the University of Göttingen, are showing what effects this had and what lessons can be learned. The results of 16 studies that are currently underway have been published as a special issue in the journal Philosophical Transactions. (2020-09-09)

A difficult year for forests, fields and meadows
The warm, dry summer of 2018 has left clear traces in various ecosystems. ETH Zurich researchers have found that if the climate continues to warm up, higher altitudes can also expect negative consequences in the future. (2020-09-07)

New Research Provides Solution for the 'Dust Bowl Paradox'
During the historic drought and heatwave of the Dust Bowl, grasses better adapted to cool, wet climates moved in. After conducting a four-year field experiment, scientists think they might know why. (2020-09-01)

Songbirds reduce reproduction to help survive drought
New research from the University of Montana suggests tropical songbirds in both the Old and New Worlds reduce reproduction during severe droughts, and this - somewhat surprisingly -- may actually increase their survival rates. (2020-08-27)

How plants close their gates when microbes attack
Like humans, plants protect themselves against pathogens. An international consortium under the lead of UZH professor Cyril Zipfel has now identified a long sought-after factor of this plant immune system: The calcium channel triggers the closure of stomata upon contact with microbes such as bacteria. This innate defense mechanism could help to engineer crop plants that are resistant to pathogens. (2020-08-26)

Understanding how birds respond to extreme weather can inform conservation efforts
How do different bird species respond to extreme weather events that occur for different amounts of time, ranging from weekly events like heat waves to seasonal events like drought? And how do traits unique to different species -- for example, how far they migrate or how commonly they occur -- predict their vulnerability to extreme weather? (2020-08-21)

Global warming is changing our plant communities
In a comprehensive study of nearly 20,000 species, University of Miami research shows that plant communities are shifting to include more heat-loving species as a result of climate change. (2020-08-17)

Multi-species bacterial communities bounce back from environmental disturbances
Perturbations in the environment are common, and communities consisting of several species seem to find their way around the crisis. Species immigration is beneficial for community recovery. (2020-08-10)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.