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Current Drug delivery News and Events

Current Drug delivery News and Events, Drug delivery News Articles.
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Device could automatically deliver drug to reverse opioid overdose
Purdue University researchers are developing a device that would automatically detect opioid overdose and deliver naloxone, a drug known to reverse deadly effects. (2019-07-25)
Preclinical study of therapeutic strategy for Lafora disease shows promise
A team of scientists have designed and tested in mice a novel and promising therapeutic strategy for treating Lafora Disease (LD), a fatal form of childhood epilepsy. (2019-07-25)
Critical heart drug too pricey for some Medicare patients
An effective drug to treat chronic heart failure may cost too much for senior citizens with a standard Medicare Part D drug plan, said a study co-authored by a John A. (2019-07-22)
Study shows relationship between type of delivery and twins' psychological development
A research team of the University of Malaga (UMA) in the area of Medicine and Psychology has analyzed for the first time the effect of the type of delivery on twins' psychological development and intelligence, demonstrating that cesarean section carries an independent risk in these multiple births. (2019-07-19)
Understanding the mode of action of the primaquine: New insights into a 70 year old puzzle
Researchers at LSTM have taken significant steps in understanding the way that the anti-malarial drug primaquine (PQ) works, which they hope will lead to the development of new, safer and more effective treatments for malaria. (2019-07-19)
NIH study links air pollution to increase in newborn intensive care admissions
Infants born to women exposed to high levels of air pollution in the week before delivery are more likely to be admitted to a newborn intensive care unit (NICU), suggests an analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. (2019-07-19)
'Trojan horse' anticancer drug disguises itself as fat
A stealthy new drug-delivery system disguises chemotherapeutics as fat in order to outsmart, penetrate and destroy tumors. (2019-07-18)
Heart drug could increase survival rates for children with aggressive form of brain tumor
Researchers at the University of Nottingham have discovered that repurposing a heart drug could significantly increase the survival rate for children with ependymoma - a type of brain tumour. (2019-07-16)
Early benefit assessment reveals weaknesses in the development of new drugs
In the British Medical Journal, IQWiG researchers analyse the first 216 AMNOG assessments of new drugs and derive proposals for more targeted drug development. (2019-07-11)
Metabolic reprogramming of branched-chain amino acid facilitates drug resistance in lung cancer
Research teams led by Dr. Ji Hongbin at the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dr. (2019-07-09)
DGIST Discovers control of cell signaling using a cobalt (iii)-nitrosyl complex
Joint research team of Professors Jaeheung Cho and Daeha Seo in the Department of Emerging Materials Science developed a technology to control the generation of nitric oxide in cells. (2019-07-02)
New metalloenzyme-based system allows selective targeting of cancer cells
RIKEN researchers have developed a promising method to deliver a drug to cancer cells without affecting surrounding tissues, involving a clever combination of an 'artificial metalloenzyme' that protects a metal catalyst, and a sugar chain that guides the metalloenzyme to the desired cells. (2019-07-01)
Deal or no deal? How discounts for unhappy subscribers can backfire on businesses
New research from the University of Notre Dame demonstrates discounts may not be successful in retaining customers in the long term. (2019-07-01)
New method reveals how well TB antibiotics reach their targets
Scientists have developed a new technique that enables them to visualise how well antibiotics against tuberculosis (TB) reach their pathogenic targets inside human hosts. (2019-06-27)
Immunological discovery opens new possibilities for using antibodies
Researchers from the University of Turku have discovered a new route that transports subcutaneously administered antibodies into lymph nodes in just a few seconds. (2019-06-26)
A better way to encapsulate islet cells for diabetes treatment
MIT researchers have come up with a novel way to prevent fibrosis, which can lead to rejection of implantable medical devices, by incorporating a crystallized immunosuppressant drug into the devices. (2019-06-26)
Remote-controlled drug delivery implant size of grape may help chronic disease management
People with chronic diseases like arthritis, diabetes and heart disease may one day forego the daily regimen of pills and, instead, receive a scheduled dosage of medication through a grape-sized implant that is remotely controlled. (2019-06-25)
Shot could remove side effects from late-stage head and neck cancer therapy
A new chemoradiotherapy formulation could kill head and neck cancer cells more effectively -- without the side effects. (2019-06-25)
Cannabidiol is a powerful new antibiotic
New research has found that Cannnabidiol is active against Gram-positive bacteria, including those responsible for many serious infections (such as Staphyloccocus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae), with potency similar to that of established antibiotics such as vancomycin or daptomycin. (2019-06-23)
Reconfigurable multi-organ-on-a-chip system reliably evaluates chemotherapy toxicity
Christopher McAleer and colleagues have created a new multiorgan-on-a-chip system that can accurately capture the toxic effects of chemotherapies that have been metabolized by the liver -- effects usually not seen in standard cell culture preclinical drug development. (2019-06-19)
Gold adds the shine of reversible assembly to protein cages
An international team including researchers from the University of Tsukuba has shown the reversible self-assembly of protein cages using gold ions to direct the process. (2019-06-18)
Opioid alternative? Taming tetrodotoxin for precise painkilling
Alternatives to opioids for treating pain are sorely needed. A study in rats suggests that tetrodotoxin, properly packaged, offers a safe pain block. (2019-06-12)
Researchers develop drug-targeting molecules to improve cancer treatment
A compound was developed from a new material, described as an easily injected hydrogel, which acts as a 'homing' cue to attract drug molecules to sites bearing a tumor. (2019-06-12)
Proof of sandwiched graphene-membrane superstructure opens up a membrane-specific drug delivery mode
Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Tsinghua University (THU) proved a sandwiched superstructure for graphene oxide (GO) that transport inside cell membranes for the first time. (2019-06-07)
Long exposure to protein inhibitor may be key to more effective chemotherapy for cancer
Researchers at SMU's Center for Drug Discovery, Design and Delivery (CD4) have succeeded in lab testing the use of chemotherapy with a specific protein inhibitor so that the chemotherapeutic is better absorbed by drug-resistant cancer cells without harming healthy cells. (2019-06-07)
Ultrasound method restores dopaminergic pathway in brain at Parkinson's early stages
Researchers have developed a technique that could open up new ways to facilitate targeted drug delivery into the brain, enabling drugs to treat brain diseases more focally. (2019-06-06)
Visible public health leadership needed to boost vaccine coverage
Public health expert Professor John Ashton is calling for local directors of public health to provide visible leadership to address the recent systematic deterioration of vaccine coverage levels. (2019-06-05)
Cancer-fighting combination targets glioblastoma
An international team of researchers combined a calorie-restricted diet high in fat and low in carbohydrates with a tumor-inhibiting antibiotic and found the combination destroys cancer stem cells and mesenchymal cells, the two major cells found in glioblastoma, a fast-moving brain cancer that resists traditional treatment protocols. (2019-05-30)
Scientists develop gel-based delivery system for stem cell-derived factors
In ongoing research to find a treatment for acute kidney injury, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists have further advanced a promising approach using therapeutic factors produced by stem cells by creating a more efficient delivery method that would improve tissue regeneration. (2019-05-30)
How bacteria acquire antibiotic resistance in the presence of antibiotics
A new study's disconcerting findings reveal how antibiotic resistance is able to spread between bacteria cells despite the presence of antibiotics that should prevent them from growing. (2019-05-23)
How plant viruses can be used to ward off pests and keep plants healthy
Imagine a technology that could target pesticides to treat specific spots deep within the soil, making them more effective at controlling infestations while limiting their toxicity to the environment. (2019-05-20)
Why do women military vets avoid using VA benefits?
Many women military veterans turn to the Veterans Administration (VA) for health care and social services only as a 'last resort' or 'safety net,' typically for an emergency or catastrophic health event, or when private health insurance is unaffordable. (2019-05-20)
June's SLAS technology special collection now available
The June issue of SLAS Technology features the article, 'Next Generation Compound Delivery to Support Miniaturized Biology,' which focuses on the challenges of changing the established screening paradigm to support the needs of modern drug discovery. (2019-05-20)
Designing biological movement on the nanometer scale
Synthetic proteins have now been created that can move in response to their environment in predictable and tunable ways. (2019-05-16)
3D images reveal how infants' heads change shape during birth
Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), scientists have captured 3D images that show how infants' brains and skulls change shape as they move through the birth canal just before delivery. (2019-05-15)
Jawless fish take a bite out of the blood-brain barrier
A jawless parasitic fish could help lead the way to more effective treatments for multiple brain ailments, including cancer, trauma and stroke. (2019-05-15)
Historically 'safer' tramadol more likely than other opioids to result in prolonged use
Surgical patients receiving the opioid tramadol have a somewhat higher risk of prolonged use than those receiving other common opioids, new Mayo Clinic research finds. (2019-05-14)
Cell membrane as coating materials to better surface engineering of nanocarriers
Coating natural cell membranes on synthetic nanocarriers represents an innovative strategy of surface engineering. (2019-05-14)
Researchers identify faster, more effective drug combinations to treat tuberculosis
Study describes a way to reduce the duration of tuberculosis treatment by using an approach called 'artificial intelligence-parabolic response surface' that allows researchers to quickly identify three or four drug combinations among billions of possible combinations to treat TB up to five times faster than current therapies. (2019-05-14)
Opioids: Leading cause of pregnancy-related death in new Utah moms
Postpartum women who have previously or currently struggle with substance abuse are at greater risk of overdosing. (2019-05-09)
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