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Current Earthquakes News and Events

Current Earthquakes News and Events, Earthquakes News Articles.
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Earthquake lightning: Mysterious luminescence phenomena
Photoemission induced by rock fracturing can occur as a result of landslides associated with earthquakes. (2020-09-28)
How earthquake swarms arise
A new fault simulator maps out how interactions between pressure, friction and fluids rising through a fault zone can lead to slow-motion quakes and seismic swarms. (2020-09-24)
Undersea earthquakes shake up climate science
Sound generated by seismic events on the seabed can be used to determine the temperature of Earth's warming oceans. (2020-09-18)
Detaching and uplifting, not bulldozing
ETH researchers have used a computer model to test a new hypothesis about the formation of the Alps while simulating seismic activity in Switzerland. (2020-09-17)
Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Deep-seated landslides in the central Oregon Coast Range are triggered mostly by rainfall, not by large offshore earthquakes. (2020-09-16)
Ancient earthquake may have caused destruction of Canaanite palace at Tel Kabri
A team of Israeli and American researchers has uncovered new evidence that an earthquake may have caused the destruction and abandonment of a flourishing Canaanite palatial site about 3,700 years ago. (2020-09-11)
Deep underground forces explain quakes on San Andreas Fault
Rock-melting forces occurring much deeper in the Earth than previously understood drive tremors along a segment of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, Calif., new USC research shows. (2020-09-04)
The Le Teil earthquake provides new insights on seismic risk in France and Western Europe
On 11 November 2019, a magnitude 5 earthquake occurred near the village of Le Teil in the Rhône River Valley in southern France producing an unexpected surface rupture with ground displacement. (2020-08-27)
A new iron based superelastic alloy capable of withstanding extreme temperatures
Researchers from Tohoku University's Graduate School of Engineering have discovered a novel iron-based superelastic alloy (SEA) capable of withstanding extreme temperatures--both high and low. (2020-08-20)
Machine learning unearths signature of slow-slip quake origins in seismic data
Combing through historical seismic data, researchers using a machine learning model have unearthed distinct statistical features marking the formative stage of slow-slip ruptures in the earth's crust months before tremor or GPS data detected a slip in the tectonic plates. (2020-08-18)
Rare 'boomerang' earthquake observed along Atlantic Ocean fault line
Scientists have tracked a 'boomerang' earthquake in the ocean for the first time, providing clues about how they could cause devastation on land. (2020-08-10)
Scientists develop principles for the creation of an "acoustic diode"
In research published in Science Advances, a group led by scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS) have used a principle, ''magneto-rotation coupling,'' to suppress the transmission of sound waves on the surface of a film in one direction while allowing them to travel in the other. (2020-08-07)
Citizen scientists help geologists to identify earthquakes and tectonic tremors
A new study shows that citizen scientists can help professionals in identifying seismic events. (2020-08-06)
Researchers: What's in oilfield wastewater matters for injection-induced earthquakes
Specifically, he pointed out that oilfield brine has much different properties, like density and viscosity, than pure water, and these differences affect the processes that cause fluid pressure to trigger earthquakes. (2020-08-06)
One-size does not fit all for post-disaster recovery, PSU study finds
A new Portland State University study that followed 400 households after the 2015 Nepal earthquakes provides insight into better understanding the factors that contribute to resilience and change in short-term rural natural disaster recovery. (2020-07-30)
"Inchworm" pattern of Indonesian earthquake rupture powered seismic "boom"
A sonic boom-like seismic phenomenon of supershear rupture occurred during the 2018 Palu earthquake in Indonesia. (2020-07-27)
Citizen science at heart of new study showing COVID-19 seismic noise reduction
Research published in the journal Science, using a mix of professional and Raspberry Shake citizen seismic data, finds that lockdown measures to slow the spread of the virus COVID-19 reduced seismic noise by 50% worldwide. (2020-07-24)
Seismic background noise drastically reduced due to COVID-19 lockdown measures
Global COVID-19 ''lockdown'' measures - the quarantines, physical isolation, travel restrictions and widespread closures of services and industry that countries around the world have implemented in 2020 - resulted in a months-long reduction in global seismic noise by up to 50%, representing the longest and most prominent global seismic noise reduction in recorded history. (2020-07-23)
COVID-19 lockdown caused 50% global reduction in human-linked Earth vibrations
The lack of human activity during lockdown caused human-linked vibrations in the Earth to drop by an average of 50% between March and May 2020. (2020-07-23)
What factors influence the likelihood of fracking-related seismicity in Oklahoma?
The depth of a hydraulic fracturing well in Oklahoma, among other factors, increases the probability that fracking will lead to earthquake activity, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2020-07-21)
Geophysics: A first for a unique instrument
Geophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have measured Earth's spin and axis orientation with a novel ring laser, and provided the most precise determination of these parameters yet achieved by a ground-based instrument without the need for stellar range finding. (2020-07-20)
A new idea on how Earth's outer shell first broke into tectonic plates
Plate tectonics theory posits that Earth's outer shell is subdivided into plates that move relative to each other, concentrating most activity along the boundaries between plates, yet the scientific community has no firm concept on how plate tectonics got started. (2020-07-19)
The sixth sense of animals
Continuously observing animals with motion sensors could improve earthquake prediction. (2020-07-03)
Typhoon changed earthquake patterns
Intensive erosion can temporarily change the earthquake activity (seismicity) of a region significantly. (2020-07-02)
Cause of abnormal groundwater rise after large earthquake
Abnormal rises in groundwater levels after large earthquakes has been observed all over the world, but the cause has remained unknown due to a lack of comparative data before & after earthquakes. (2020-07-01)
Researchers catch a wave to determine how forces control granular material properties
Stress wave propagation through grainy, or granular, materials is important for detecting the magnitude of earthquakes, locating oil and gas reservoirs, designing acoustic insulation and designing materials for compacting powders. (2020-06-29)
New research reveals how water in the deep Earth triggers earthquakes and tsunamis
In a new study, published in the journal Nature, an international team of scientists provide the first conclusive evidence directly linking deep Earth's water cycle and its expressions with magmatic productivity and earthquake activity. (2020-06-24)
Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan in input-output analysis
Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan was examined in IOA. (2020-06-24)
How the giant sequoia protects itself
A three-dimensional network of fibers makes the bark resistant to fire and rock fall. (2020-06-17)
Geoscientists create deeper look at processes below Earth's surface with 3D images
Geoscientists at The University of Texas at Dallas recently used massive amounts of earthquake data and supercomputers to generate high-resolution, 3D images of the dynamic geological processes taking place far below the Earth's surface. (2020-06-17)
Which factors control the height of mountains?
Which forces and mechanisms determine the height of mountains? A group of researchers from Münster and Potsdam has now found a surprising answer: It is not erosion and weathering of rocks that determine the upper limit of mountain massifs, but rather an equilibrium of forces in the Earth's crust. (2020-06-11)
Australia's ancient geology controls the pathways of modern earthquakes
New research near Uluru in Australia's arid centre shows that rock structures formed deep within the ancient Gondwana supercontinent controlled the rupture pathways of one of Australia's largest modern earthquakes. (2020-06-04)
Study shows diamonds aren't forever
Two Tulane researchers were among a team of international experts who co-authored a paper that was published in the journal Nature on June 3. (2020-06-04)
New discovery could highlight areas where earthquakes are less likely to occur
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered specific conditions that occur along the ocean floor where two tectonic plates are more likely to slowly creep past one another as opposed to drastically slipping and creating catastrophic earthquakes. (2020-06-02)
New clues to deep earthquake mystery
A new understanding of our planet's deepest earthquakes could help unravel one of the most mysterious geophysical processes on Earth. (2020-05-27)
FSU researcher detects unknown submarine landslides in Gulf of Mexico
A Florida State University researcher has used new detection methods to identify 85 previously unknown submarine landslides that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico between 2008 and 2015, leading to questions about the stability of oil rigs and other structures, such as pipelines built in the region. (2020-05-18)
Portland State researcher develops new model to accurately date historic earthquakes
Three earthquakes in the Monterey Bay Area, occurring in 1838, 1890 and 1906, happened without a doubt on the San Andreas Fault, according to a new paper by a Portland State University researcher. (2020-05-14)
'Lettere patenti' help assess intensity of historic central Italian earthquakes
Three hundred-year-old administrative documents from the Roman government, granting residents permission to repair damage to their buildings, can help modern-day seismologists calculate intensities for a notable sequence of earthquakes that struck central Italy in 1703. (2020-05-13)
Growing mountains or shifting ground: What is going on in Earth's inner core?
Exhaustive seismic data from repeating earthquakes and new data-processing methods have yielded the best evidence yet that the Earth's inner core is rotating - revealing a better understanding of the hotly debated processes that control the planet's magnetic field. (2020-05-12)
Scientists observes changes in Earth's surface movement months before big earthquakes
Months prior to the earthquakes in Chile 2010 and Japan 2011, oscillations of the earth's surface occurred, in extensions of about 1,000 kilometers in each country, after which the decoupling of the tectonic plates was generated, causing both major earthquakes. (2020-05-06)
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