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Current Ecology News and Events

Current Ecology News and Events, Ecology News Articles.
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Honeybee mite raises bumblebee virus risk
A mite that spreads a dangerous virus among honeybees also plays an indirect role in infecting wild bumblebees, new research shows. (2019-06-12)
Rapid change in coral reefs prompts global calls for a rethink
Coral reef experts from around the world are calling for an urgent re-evaluation of our climate goals in the light of increasing evidence of unprecedented speed of change to these fragile ecosystems. (2019-06-07)
Counting the uncounted
Though abundance is a fundamental measure in ecology and environmental management, detecting all individuals in a population is usually impossible when monitoring, so estimates of abundance must account for imperfect detection. (2019-06-06)
Study: Underrepresented faculty play an uneven role in advancing diversity and inclusion
A team of researchers at Colorado State surveyed faculty members from ecology and evolutionary biology programs at universities across the United States and found that while most respondents reported engaging in diversity and inclusion activities, those who participated in these activities at the highest levels were more likely to identify themselves as non-white, non-male or the first generation in their family to attend college. (2019-06-03)
New mineral classification system captures Earth's complex past
A system of categorization that reflects not just a mineral's chemistry and crystalline structure, but also the physical, chemical, or biological processes by which it formed, would be capable of recognizing that nanodiamonds from space are fundamentally different to diamonds formed in Earth's depths. (2019-06-03)
Feathers came first, then birds
New research, led by the University of Bristol, suggests that feathers arose 100 million years before birds -- changing how we look at dinosaurs, birds, and pterosaurs, the flying reptiles. (2019-06-03)
Brain size and fertility in mammals may depend on who cares for offspring
The evolution of larger brain size in offspring is associated with the amount of paternal care in mammals, whereas higher fertility in the mothers is correlated with additional care support from individuals that are not the offspring's biological parents (alloparents), according to a study published in the journal Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology. (2019-05-29)
Godzilla is back and he's bigger than ever: The evolutionary biology of the monster
Godzilla first made his debut in 1954 as a 50-meter tall metaphor for indiscriminate destruction, particularly US hydrogen-bomb testing in the Marshall Islands, which, in the film, destroyed Godzilla's deep-sea ecosystem. (2019-05-29)
Wolf-dog 'swarms' threaten Europe's wolves
'Swarms' of wolf-dog crossbreeds could drive Europe's wolves out of existence, according to the lead author of new research. (2019-05-23)
Conservation goals compete at the expense of biodiversity
With an ever-growing list of threats facing biodiversity on multiple scales, conservationists struggle to determine which to address. (2019-05-23)
Toward zero hunger: More food or a smarter food system?
When thinking about ways to end global hunger, many scholars focus too narrowly on increasing crop yields while overlooking other critical aspects of the food system. (2019-05-21)
Statistical model could predict future disease outbreaks
Several University of Georgia researchers teamed up to create a statistical method that may allow public health and infectious disease forecasters to better predict disease reemergence, especially for preventable childhood infections such as measles and pertussis. (2019-05-21)
Ernst Haeckel: Pioneer of modern science
Evolutionary biologist Ernst Haeckel became the first person to define the term ecology in his work published in 1866, entitled 'General Morphology of Organisms'. (2019-05-17)
Opposite pathways in forest recovery
Tropical forests are being deforested at an alarming rate to make way for agriculture; the good news is that they can regrow naturally when the fields are abandoned. (2019-05-17)
Native forest plants rebound when invasive shrubs are removed
Removing invasive shrubs to restore native forest habitat brings a surprising result, according to Penn State researchers, who say desired native understory plants display an unexpected ability and vigor to recolonize open spots. (2019-05-14)
Climate change -- early spring: Predicting budburst with genetics
Tree and shrub genetics can be used to produce more accurate predictions of when leaves will burst bud in the spring, according to a Canada-US study. (2019-05-07)
Study reveals how social relationships transform bird flocks
Flocks of birds may appear to move with a single mind, but new research shows jackdaws stick with their mates -- even though it harms the flock. (2019-05-06)
Research shows cattle ranching could help conserve rare African antelope, lions
Ranch managers' placement of cattle corrals away from Jackson's hartebeest likely would allow the antelope species to increase, with lions focused on the zebras that congregate at the resulting glades in central Kenya. (2019-05-03)
The quiet loss of knowledge threatens indigenous communities
Most of the knowledge that indigenous communities in South America have about plants is not written down. (2019-05-02)
The hunger gaps: How flowering times affect farmland bees
For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. (2019-05-01)
The sicker the better
A common woodland beetle that plays an important role in the decomposition of fallen trees may be getting a boost from a surprising source: parasites. (2019-05-01)
Red-neck phalarope: a migratory divide towards the Pacific Ocean and the Arabian Sea
When winter comes, populations of red-neck phalarope from the Western Palearctic migrate to two different destinations -the Pacific Ocean or the Arabian Sea- following an exceptional migratory divide strategy which has never been described in this geographical area. (2019-04-26)
Amazonian soils mapped using indicator species
Understanding the ecology and distributions of species in Amazonia is hampered by lack of information about environmental conditions, such as soils. (2019-04-17)
Astro-ecology: Counting orangutans using star-spotting technology
A groundbreaking scientific collaboration is harnessing technology used to study the luminosity of stars, to carry out detailed monitoring of orangutan populations in Borneo. (2019-04-09)
New pathways for sustainable agriculture
Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature. (2019-04-08)
Scientists explore causes of biodiversity in perching birds
New research by a global team of scientists has resulted in significant strides in ornithological classification and identified possible causes of diversity among modern bird species. (2019-04-05)
Sea snakes make record-setting deep dives
Sea snakes, best known from shallow tropical waters, have been recorded swimming at 250 meters in the deep-sea 'twilight zone,' smashing the previous diving record of 133 meters held by sea snakes. (2019-04-02)
The hotter it gets, the more forests act as insulators
Using data from about a hundred sites worldwide, an international research team has demonstrated that forest cover acts as a global thermal insulator, by cooling the understory when the air temperature is high. (2019-04-01)
The evolution of bird-of-paradise sex chromosomes revealed
Birds-of-paradise are a group of songbird species, and are known for their magnificent male plumage and bewildering sexual display. (2019-04-01)
Feather mites may help clean birds' plumage, study shows
Feather mites help to remove bacteria and fungi from the feathers of birds, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-03-28)
What is gender equality in science? Common solutions may not be solving the problem
Despite the scientific community taking action on gender inequality, the problem persists. (2019-03-27)
Genetic tagging may help conserve the world's wildlife
Tracking animals using DNA signatures are ideally suited to answer the pressing questions required to conserve the world's wildlife, providing benefits over invasive methods such as ear tags and collars, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-03-26)
Study: AIDS-immunocompromised populations see more antibiotic-resistant infections
Populations with a high prevalence of AIDS-immunocompromised people are more likely to see the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, according to a study coauthored by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and published in PLOS One. (2019-03-26)
Wagers winter plants make to survive
In a recently published study, UA ecologists have identified the bets that the most successful annual plants place with water resources. (2019-03-25)
Caterpillars retrieve 'voicemail' by eating soil
Leaf-feeding caterpillars greatly enrich their intestinal flora by eating soil. (2019-03-22)
Hungry moose more tolerant of wolves' presence
Research in western Wyoming shows that close proximity of wolves does cause moose to move, but not enough to drive them from their preferred habitats -- especially late in the winter. (2019-03-13)
No super-Drosophila: Vinegar fly species have a good vision or olfaction, but not both
A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology has systematically studied and compared the eyes and antennae and the associated brain structures of more than 60 species of the genus Drosophila. (2019-03-12)
New study explores impacts of marine and freshwater predators on ecosystems and society
A new study from a team of leading scientists reports on the diverse ways that aquatic predators, such as sharks and alligators, can impact ecosystems and also benefit human society. (2019-03-11)
Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)
Translocation of bighorn sheep in Arizona has positive genetic outcomes
Research shows it is possible to re-establish bighorn sheep populations without a reduction of genetic diversity over a short period and without erosion of ancestral lineage. (2019-03-06)
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