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Current Ecology News and Events

Current Ecology News and Events, Ecology News Articles.
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Amazonian soils mapped using indicator species
Understanding the ecology and distributions of species in Amazonia is hampered by lack of information about environmental conditions, such as soils. (2019-04-17)
Astro-ecology: Counting orangutans using star-spotting technology
A groundbreaking scientific collaboration is harnessing technology used to study the luminosity of stars, to carry out detailed monitoring of orangutan populations in Borneo. (2019-04-09)
New pathways for sustainable agriculture
Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature. (2019-04-08)
Scientists explore causes of biodiversity in perching birds
New research by a global team of scientists has resulted in significant strides in ornithological classification and identified possible causes of diversity among modern bird species. (2019-04-05)
Sea snakes make record-setting deep dives
Sea snakes, best known from shallow tropical waters, have been recorded swimming at 250 meters in the deep-sea 'twilight zone,' smashing the previous diving record of 133 meters held by sea snakes. (2019-04-02)
The hotter it gets, the more forests act as insulators
Using data from about a hundred sites worldwide, an international research team has demonstrated that forest cover acts as a global thermal insulator, by cooling the understory when the air temperature is high. (2019-04-01)
The evolution of bird-of-paradise sex chromosomes revealed
Birds-of-paradise are a group of songbird species, and are known for their magnificent male plumage and bewildering sexual display. (2019-04-01)
Feather mites may help clean birds' plumage, study shows
Feather mites help to remove bacteria and fungi from the feathers of birds, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-03-28)
What is gender equality in science? Common solutions may not be solving the problem
Despite the scientific community taking action on gender inequality, the problem persists. (2019-03-27)
Genetic tagging may help conserve the world's wildlife
Tracking animals using DNA signatures are ideally suited to answer the pressing questions required to conserve the world's wildlife, providing benefits over invasive methods such as ear tags and collars, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-03-26)
Study: AIDS-immunocompromised populations see more antibiotic-resistant infections
Populations with a high prevalence of AIDS-immunocompromised people are more likely to see the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, according to a study coauthored by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and published in PLOS One. (2019-03-26)
Wagers winter plants make to survive
In a recently published study, UA ecologists have identified the bets that the most successful annual plants place with water resources. (2019-03-25)
Caterpillars retrieve 'voicemail' by eating soil
Leaf-feeding caterpillars greatly enrich their intestinal flora by eating soil. (2019-03-22)
Hungry moose more tolerant of wolves' presence
Research in western Wyoming shows that close proximity of wolves does cause moose to move, but not enough to drive them from their preferred habitats -- especially late in the winter. (2019-03-13)
No super-Drosophila: Vinegar fly species have a good vision or olfaction, but not both
A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology has systematically studied and compared the eyes and antennae and the associated brain structures of more than 60 species of the genus Drosophila. (2019-03-12)
New study explores impacts of marine and freshwater predators on ecosystems and society
A new study from a team of leading scientists reports on the diverse ways that aquatic predators, such as sharks and alligators, can impact ecosystems and also benefit human society. (2019-03-11)
Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)
Translocation of bighorn sheep in Arizona has positive genetic outcomes
Research shows it is possible to re-establish bighorn sheep populations without a reduction of genetic diversity over a short period and without erosion of ancestral lineage. (2019-03-06)
UM researchers study Alaska forest fires over past 450 years
In a recent study, University of Montana researchers explored the ways forest succession and climate variability interacted and influenced fires in Alaska's boreal forests over the past four centuries -- from 1550 to 2015. (2019-03-05)
Studying species interactions using remote camera traps
In a recent study carried out by researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Germany and University of California, Davis, USA, the scientists explored to what extent camera trap data are suitable to assess subtle species interactions such as avoidance in space and time. (2019-02-22)
Method assesses health and size of lizard populations
Monitoring programs that survey many wildlife species at the same time across large geographic regions are important for informing conservation decisions, but reptiles are often missing from these efforts because they are difficult to survey. (2019-02-21)
Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments
Researchers swabbed more than 2300 animals representing 205 amphibian species to better understand the ecology of their skin bacteria. (2019-02-21)
How one gene in a tiny fish may alter an aquatic ecosystem
Variations in a single gene in a tiny fish alter how they interact with their environment, according to research led by the University of Pennsylvania's Seth Rudman, a postdoctoral researcher. (2019-02-06)
Scientists strategize for better conservation plans
Endangered and invasive species may be better managed in the future with new techniques outlined by a Texas A&M University scientist and others. (2019-02-01)
Modern humans replaced Neanderthals in southern Spain 44,000 years ago
The University of Cordoba, in collaboration with the University of Granada, participated in an international study published today in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, proving that Neanderthals were replaced by modern humans in southern Iberia 5,000 years before than previously thought (2019-01-30)
Bird beaks did not adapt to food types as previously thought
A study, led by the University of Bristol, has shed some new light on how the beaks of birds have adapted over time. (2019-01-22)
Let's prepare now so farming insects as food is environmentally friendly, say scientists
As whole-roasted crickets gain traction as a protein-rich snack and restaurants experiment with mealworms on the menu, there's still 'an overwhelming lack of knowledge' concerning the ecological sustainability of the emerging, multi-million-dollar insects-as-food industry, say researchers at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. (2019-01-14)
New mathematical model can help save endangered species
One of the greatest challenges in saving endangered species is to predict if an animal population will die out. (2019-01-11)
New research is using drones to tackle climate change
A team of Nottingham scientists is using drones to survey woody climbing plants and better understand how they may affect the carbon balance of tropical rainforests. (2019-01-09)
ESA Tipsheet for January 2019
Get a sneak peek into these new scientific papers, publishing on January 3, 2019 in the Ecological Society of America's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. (2018-12-28)
More young and other traits help mammals adapt to urban environments
Species of mammals that live in urban environments produce more young compared to other mammals. (2018-12-21)
HKU fossil imaging helps push back feather origins by 70 million years
In a new study published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, an international team led by Professor Baoyu Jiang of Nanjing University and including Dr Michael Pittman of the Department of Earth Sciences, the University of Hong Kong, shows that pterosaurs had at least four types of feathers in common with their close relatives the dinosaurs, pushing back the origin of feathers by some 70 million years. (2018-12-18)
Scientists revealed how water fleas settled during the Ice Age
A new study shows that the roots used by three close species of microscopic Daphnia crustaceans to settle across the territory of Northern Eurasia differed greatly. (2018-12-17)
Species at the extremes of the food chain evolve faster, study says
Reef fish species at the extremes of the food chain -- those that are strict herbivores or strict fish predators -- evolve faster than fish species in the middle of the food chain with a more varied diet, according to a new study published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. (2018-12-17)
Plants' defense against insects is a bouquet
Michigan State University scholar Andrea Glassmire and her colleagues have revealed how the mixture of chemical weapons deployed by plants keeps marauding insects off base better than a one-note defense. (2018-12-13)
Increasing seal population will not harm largest fish stocks in the Baltic
Seals feeding on fish does not decrease fish stocks of Baltic cod, herring and sprat the most -- climate change, nutrient load and fisheries do, shows a new study from Stockholm University. (2018-12-10)
Frog sex in the city
How do animals adapt to urban environments? In the case of the Tungara frog, city males put on a more elaborate mating display than males in forested areas. (2018-12-10)
Can rice filter water from ag fields?
While it's an important part of our diets, new research shows that rice plants can be used in a different way, too: to clean runoff from farms before it gets into rivers, lakes, and streams. (2018-12-05)
Enhancing our vision of the past
An international group of scientists led by researchers from the University of Bristol have advanced our understanding of how ancient animals saw the world by combining the study of fossils and genetics. (2018-12-04)
In death, Lonesome George reveals why giant tortoises live so long
Genetic analysis of DNA from Lonesome George and samples from other giant tortoises of the Galapagos -- which can live more than 100 years in captivity -- found they possessed a number of gene variants linked to DNA repair, immune response, and cancer suppression not possessed by shorter-lived vertebrates. (2018-12-03)
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