Nav: Home

Current Ecology News and Events

Current Ecology News and Events, Ecology News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Untangling the branches in the mammal tree of life
In a new study published in the journal PLOS Biology, researchers at Yale University unveil a complete overhaul of the way species data is brought together and analyzed to construct an evolutionary tree of life for mammals. (2019-12-04)
Young tree swallows carry environmental stress into adulthood
Cornell University researchers have found that colder temperatures during tree swallows' development stage has an effect on swallows later in life. (2019-12-03)
Sweet potato uses a single odor to warn its neighbors of insect attack
A single volatile substance can be sufficient to induce a defense response in sweet potatoes to herbivores. (2019-12-02)
Clown fish survival depends on environment more than genetics
Clown fish are unable to genetically adapt to changes in their environment. (2019-11-27)
Shrewd savannah species choose friends with benefits on the African plains
For species trying to boost their chances of avoiding predation, it could be a classic case of 'it's not what you know, it's who you know that matters,' according to new research. (2019-11-27)
People, climate, and water played a role in the extinction of Australia's megafauna
For the first time, the research suggests a combination of climate change and the impact of people sealed the fate of megafauna, at least in south-eastern Australia. (2019-11-25)
Best of the best: Who makes the most accurate decisions in expert groups?
New method predicts accuracy on the basis of similarity. (2019-11-20)
Contacts with primary care physicians did not increase after the Affordable Care Act
At the same time the Affordable Care Act increased the number of insured Americans, analysis of health care industry data shows a continued decline in contact with primary care physician services. (2019-11-12)
Found: Miniature fanged 'deer' rediscovered tiptoeing through Vietnam's coastal forests
Global Wildlife Conservation and partners Southern Institute of Ecology and Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research have rediscovered a species lost to science since 1990 called a silver-backed chevrotain -- a deer-like species that is the size of a rabbit, has a silver sheen, and has been hanging on in a region of Vietnam ravaged by poaching by snares. (2019-11-11)
Conservation scientists call for reverse to biodiversity loss
A group of international conservationists is urging governments across the globe to adopt a new approach to address the impact of economic development on the natural world. (2019-11-08)
Study examines theory on menopause age and symptom severity
A recent theory states that women enter menopause at different ages and have varying extents of symptoms due in part to residence patterns after marriage -- or whether couples disperse to live with paternal or maternal kin. (2019-11-06)
Helpful insects and landscape changes
We might not notice them, but the crops farmers grow are protected by scores of tiny invertebrate bodyguards. (2019-11-05)
Helping hands from within: Live-in bacteria protect plants against infections
Micro-organisms living inside plant roots team up to boost the plant's growth and tolerance to stress. (2019-11-01)
Best of frenemies: Unexpected role of social networks in ecology
Social networking, even between competing species, plays a much bigger role in ecology than anyone previously thought, according to three biologists at UC Davis. (2019-11-01)
Underwater grandmothers reveal big population of lethal sea snakes
A group of snorkelling grandmothers is helping scientists better understand marine ecology by photographing venomous sea snakes in waters off the city of Noumea, New Caledonia. (2019-10-22)
A complex marriage arrangement: New insights and unanswered questions in plant heterostyly
This special issue of New Phytologist explores the ecology, evolution and genetics of plant reproductive systems, an area of research championed and developed by Prof. (2019-10-21)
Deaf infants' gaze behavior more advanced than that of hearing infants
Deaf infants who have been exposed to American Sign Language are better at following an adult's gaze than their hearing peers, supporting the idea that social-cognitive development is sensitive to different kinds of life experiences. (2019-10-16)
Two new porcelain crab species discovered
Two new symbiotic porcelain crab species have been described. One of them, from the South China Sea of Vietnam, inhabits the compact tube-like shelters built by the polychaete worm with other organisms. (2019-10-15)
Big data reveals extraordinary unity underlying life's diversity
Limits to growth lie at the heart of how all living things function, according to a new study carried out by ICTA-UAB researchers. (2019-10-07)
New research furthers understanding about what shapes human gut microbiome
A new Northwestern University study finds that despite human's close genetic relationship to apes, the human gut microbiome is more similar to that of Old World monkeys like baboons than to that of apes like chimpanzees. (2019-10-07)
Plants alert neighbors to threats using common 'language'
New research from Cornell University shows that plants can communicate with each other when they come under attack from pests. (2019-10-03)
Researchers use drones to weigh whales
Researchers from Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies (AIAS) in Denmark and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US devised a way to accurately estimate the weight of free-living whales using only aerial images taken by drones. (2019-10-02)
Biologists track the invasion of herbicide-resistant weeds into southwestern Ontario
A team led by biologists from the University of Toronto have identified the ways in which herbicide-resistant strains of the invasive common waterhemp weed have emerged in fields of soy and corn in southwestern Ontario. (2019-09-30)
How fungus-farming ants could help solve our antibiotic resistance problem
For the last 60 million years, fungus-growing ants have farmed fungi for food. (2019-09-26)
Predicting a hurricane's intensity can prove difficult
Many scientists have said that storms are more intense than ever before - Cat. (2019-09-26)
The life aquatic made clear with freshwater lens
A Swansea University doctoral student has found a way to view the life of plants and animals in murky waters - by using a lens of freshwater. (2019-09-18)
Fungicides as an underestimated hazard for freshwater organisms
Large amounts of fungicides, used in agriculture, leak into nearby surface waters. (2019-09-17)
'Planting water' is possible -- against aridity and droughts
Together with scientists from the UK and the US, researchers from the Leibniz- Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have developed a mathematical model that can reflect the complex interplays between vegetation, soil and water regimes. (2019-09-11)
Conserving rare species for the maintenance of Mediterranean forests
This study has shown the importance of conserving rare species for the maintenance of complex ecosystems like Mediterranean forests. (2019-09-11)
Scientists solve lingering mystery of poorly understood frog
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at McMaster University, has solved a centuries-old mystery of 'Fraser's Clawed Frog', an unusual and elusive species found in West Africa. (2019-09-11)
Female gorillas detect and avoid sick groups
Gorillas are social animals, living in groups that females will migrate to join, becoming members of harems. (2019-09-11)
New UN high-seas treaty must close gaps in biodiversity governance
Thousands of marine species could be at risk if a new United Nations high-seas biodiversity treaty, now being negotiated in New York, does not include measures to address the management of all fish species in waters beyond national jurisdiction, not just commercial species, warns an analysis by a Duke University-led team of American, Dutch, Swiss and French researchers. (2019-08-29)
BES launches large-scale study to test whether 'blinding' reduces bias in science publishing
A two-year randomised controlled trial in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology will be the largest of its kind to date to assess whether hiding author details during peer review reduces bias against underrepresented groups in the science publishing process. (2019-08-21)
Poo transplants to help save koalas
Poo transplants are helping expand koala microbiomes, allowing the marsupials to eat a wider range of eucalypts and possibly survive habitat loss. (2019-08-20)
To make lakes healthy, you first need the right recipe
Pollution of lakes is a worldwide problem. Restoration attempts take a lot of time and effort, and even then they might backfire. (2019-08-20)
New information on tropical parasitoid insects revealed
The diversity and ecology of African parasitoid wasps was studied for over a year during a project run by the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland. (2019-08-14)
New study could reset how scientists view sex determination in painted turtle populations
A study that looks at how temperature influences the development of painted turtles may lead biologists to rethink the theoretical frameworks they use when analyzing the topic. (2019-08-06)
Road verges provide refuge for pollinators
Roadside verges provide a vital refuge for pollinators -- but they must be managed better, new research shows. (2019-08-05)
Geoengineering versus a volcano
Major volcanic eruptions spew ash particles into the atmosphere, which reflect some of the Sun's radiation back into space and cool the planet. (2019-08-05)
Symphony of genes
One of the most exciting discoveries in genome research was that the last common ancestor of all multicellular animals already possessed an extremely complex genome. (2019-08-05)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#542 Climate Doomsday
Have you heard? Climate change. We did it. And it's bad. It's going to be worse. We are already suffering the effects of it in many ways. How should we TALK about the dangers we are facing, though? Should we get people good and scared? Or give them hope? Or both? Host Bethany Brookshire talks with David Wallace-Wells and Sheril Kirschenbaum to find out. This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News. Related links: Why Climate Disasters Might Not Boost Public Engagement on Climate Change on The New York Times by Andrew Revkin The other kind...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab