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Current Ecology News and Events

Current Ecology News and Events, Ecology News Articles.
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The life aquatic made clear with freshwater lens
A Swansea University doctoral student has found a way to view the life of plants and animals in murky waters - by using a lens of freshwater. (2019-09-18)
Fungicides as an underestimated hazard for freshwater organisms
Large amounts of fungicides, used in agriculture, leak into nearby surface waters. (2019-09-17)
'Planting water' is possible -- against aridity and droughts
Together with scientists from the UK and the US, researchers from the Leibniz- Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have developed a mathematical model that can reflect the complex interplays between vegetation, soil and water regimes. (2019-09-11)
Conserving rare species for the maintenance of Mediterranean forests
This study has shown the importance of conserving rare species for the maintenance of complex ecosystems like Mediterranean forests. (2019-09-11)
Scientists solve lingering mystery of poorly understood frog
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at McMaster University, has solved a centuries-old mystery of 'Fraser's Clawed Frog', an unusual and elusive species found in West Africa. (2019-09-11)
Female gorillas detect and avoid sick groups
Gorillas are social animals, living in groups that females will migrate to join, becoming members of harems. (2019-09-11)
New UN high-seas treaty must close gaps in biodiversity governance
Thousands of marine species could be at risk if a new United Nations high-seas biodiversity treaty, now being negotiated in New York, does not include measures to address the management of all fish species in waters beyond national jurisdiction, not just commercial species, warns an analysis by a Duke University-led team of American, Dutch, Swiss and French researchers. (2019-08-29)
BES launches large-scale study to test whether 'blinding' reduces bias in science publishing
A two-year randomised controlled trial in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology will be the largest of its kind to date to assess whether hiding author details during peer review reduces bias against underrepresented groups in the science publishing process. (2019-08-21)
Poo transplants to help save koalas
Poo transplants are helping expand koala microbiomes, allowing the marsupials to eat a wider range of eucalypts and possibly survive habitat loss. (2019-08-20)
To make lakes healthy, you first need the right recipe
Pollution of lakes is a worldwide problem. Restoration attempts take a lot of time and effort, and even then they might backfire. (2019-08-20)
New information on tropical parasitoid insects revealed
The diversity and ecology of African parasitoid wasps was studied for over a year during a project run by the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland. (2019-08-14)
New study could reset how scientists view sex determination in painted turtle populations
A study that looks at how temperature influences the development of painted turtles may lead biologists to rethink the theoretical frameworks they use when analyzing the topic. (2019-08-06)
Road verges provide refuge for pollinators
Roadside verges provide a vital refuge for pollinators -- but they must be managed better, new research shows. (2019-08-05)
Geoengineering versus a volcano
Major volcanic eruptions spew ash particles into the atmosphere, which reflect some of the Sun's radiation back into space and cool the planet. (2019-08-05)
Symphony of genes
One of the most exciting discoveries in genome research was that the last common ancestor of all multicellular animals already possessed an extremely complex genome. (2019-08-05)
Caterpillars of the peppered moth perceive color through their skin
It is difficult to distinguish caterpillars of the peppered moth from a twig. (2019-08-02)
Smaller class size means more success for women in STEM
A new study demonstrates that increasing class size has the largest negative impact on female participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) classrooms, and offers insights on ways to change the trend. (2019-07-24)
Privatization of public goods can cause population decline, research shows
Scientists have given a fascinating new insight into the way microbes adopt a 'co-operative' approach to securing the nutrients they need to thrive. (2019-07-23)
Best male biathletes 'more attractive'
Top male biathletes are more attractive to the opposite sex, according to a new study by scientists at the universities of Exeter and Bristol. (2019-07-10)
The path to China's 'ecological civilization' starts with national parks
President Xi Jinping staked out China's role as a committed player to tackle the climate crisis and build an 'ecological civilization.' In a review published July 10 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, researchers discuss one of the Chinese government's efforts -- reforming the management of protected areas by streamlining agencies' responsibilities and reducing functional overlaps. (2019-07-10)
Scientists alarmed by bark beetle boom
Bark beetles are currently responsible for killing an unprecedented number of trees in forests across Europe and North America. (2019-07-01)
Honeybee mite raises bumblebee virus risk
A mite that spreads a dangerous virus among honeybees also plays an indirect role in infecting wild bumblebees, new research shows. (2019-06-12)
Rapid change in coral reefs prompts global calls for a rethink
Coral reef experts from around the world are calling for an urgent re-evaluation of our climate goals in the light of increasing evidence of unprecedented speed of change to these fragile ecosystems. (2019-06-07)
Counting the uncounted
Though abundance is a fundamental measure in ecology and environmental management, detecting all individuals in a population is usually impossible when monitoring, so estimates of abundance must account for imperfect detection. (2019-06-06)
Study: Underrepresented faculty play an uneven role in advancing diversity and inclusion
A team of researchers at Colorado State surveyed faculty members from ecology and evolutionary biology programs at universities across the United States and found that while most respondents reported engaging in diversity and inclusion activities, those who participated in these activities at the highest levels were more likely to identify themselves as non-white, non-male or the first generation in their family to attend college. (2019-06-03)
New mineral classification system captures Earth's complex past
A system of categorization that reflects not just a mineral's chemistry and crystalline structure, but also the physical, chemical, or biological processes by which it formed, would be capable of recognizing that nanodiamonds from space are fundamentally different to diamonds formed in Earth's depths. (2019-06-03)
Feathers came first, then birds
New research, led by the University of Bristol, suggests that feathers arose 100 million years before birds -- changing how we look at dinosaurs, birds, and pterosaurs, the flying reptiles. (2019-06-03)
Brain size and fertility in mammals may depend on who cares for offspring
The evolution of larger brain size in offspring is associated with the amount of paternal care in mammals, whereas higher fertility in the mothers is correlated with additional care support from individuals that are not the offspring's biological parents (alloparents), according to a study published in the journal Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology. (2019-05-29)
Godzilla is back and he's bigger than ever: The evolutionary biology of the monster
Godzilla first made his debut in 1954 as a 50-meter tall metaphor for indiscriminate destruction, particularly US hydrogen-bomb testing in the Marshall Islands, which, in the film, destroyed Godzilla's deep-sea ecosystem. (2019-05-29)
Wolf-dog 'swarms' threaten Europe's wolves
'Swarms' of wolf-dog crossbreeds could drive Europe's wolves out of existence, according to the lead author of new research. (2019-05-23)
Conservation goals compete at the expense of biodiversity
With an ever-growing list of threats facing biodiversity on multiple scales, conservationists struggle to determine which to address. (2019-05-23)
Toward zero hunger: More food or a smarter food system?
When thinking about ways to end global hunger, many scholars focus too narrowly on increasing crop yields while overlooking other critical aspects of the food system. (2019-05-21)
Statistical model could predict future disease outbreaks
Several University of Georgia researchers teamed up to create a statistical method that may allow public health and infectious disease forecasters to better predict disease reemergence, especially for preventable childhood infections such as measles and pertussis. (2019-05-21)
Ernst Haeckel: Pioneer of modern science
Evolutionary biologist Ernst Haeckel became the first person to define the term ecology in his work published in 1866, entitled 'General Morphology of Organisms'. (2019-05-17)
Opposite pathways in forest recovery
Tropical forests are being deforested at an alarming rate to make way for agriculture; the good news is that they can regrow naturally when the fields are abandoned. (2019-05-17)
Native forest plants rebound when invasive shrubs are removed
Removing invasive shrubs to restore native forest habitat brings a surprising result, according to Penn State researchers, who say desired native understory plants display an unexpected ability and vigor to recolonize open spots. (2019-05-14)
Climate change -- early spring: Predicting budburst with genetics
Tree and shrub genetics can be used to produce more accurate predictions of when leaves will burst bud in the spring, according to a Canada-US study. (2019-05-07)
Study reveals how social relationships transform bird flocks
Flocks of birds may appear to move with a single mind, but new research shows jackdaws stick with their mates -- even though it harms the flock. (2019-05-06)
Research shows cattle ranching could help conserve rare African antelope, lions
Ranch managers' placement of cattle corrals away from Jackson's hartebeest likely would allow the antelope species to increase, with lions focused on the zebras that congregate at the resulting glades in central Kenya. (2019-05-03)
The quiet loss of knowledge threatens indigenous communities
Most of the knowledge that indigenous communities in South America have about plants is not written down. (2019-05-02)
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