Nav: Home

Current Economic growth News and Events

Current Economic growth News and Events, Economic growth News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
The costs and benefits of addressing customer complaints
Developing a strategy to achieve an optimal recovery-loyalty yield is more advantageous than adopting the mantra that the customer is always right. (2020-08-07)
Despite decline, distribution of air pollution highlights socioeconomic disparities
While the level of fine particulate air pollution has declined considerably over the last several decades, a new study finds that its distribution has remained largely unchanged. (2020-07-30)
How global responses to COVID-19 threaten global food security
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has forced nations worldwide to implement unprecedented social measures to stem the rapid spread of the virus. (2020-07-30)
Study provides new insight on colorectal cancer growth
A new study by researchers at the University of Kentucky identifies a novel function of the enzyme spermine synthase to facilitate colorectal cancer growth. (2020-07-29)
COVID-19 risk model uses hospital data to guide decisions on social distancing
With communities throughout the United States combating surges in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Northwestern University have created a framework that helps policymakers determine which data to track and when to take action to protect their communities. (2020-07-29)
NZ-China agreement has brought strong economic gains, Otago research
An Otago economist argues New Zealand should expand its trade agreements in the wake of COVID-19, as his new research shows the country benefited from the NZ-China free trade agreement. (2020-07-28)
Leaving money on the table to stay in the game
Unlike businesses or governments, organisms can't go into evolutionary debt -- there is no borrowing one's way back from extinction. (2020-07-27)
Big wheel ruts, big economic losses
Research suggests the economic loss from wheel-traffic compaction for farmers in North Dakota and Minnesota could exceed 1 billion USD. (2020-07-23)
Fertility is likely to decline in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study finds
Fertility is likely to decline in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, a new Bocconi University study finds (2020-07-23)
Socio-economic status predicts UK boys' development of essential thinking skills
A comparison of children in Hong Kong, mainland China and the UK has found that British boys' development of key thinking skills, known as 'executive functions', is unusually reliant on their socio-economic status. (2020-07-20)
Moffitt researchers find dual inhibitor may be safer for CLL patients
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers want to learn more about how PI3K inhibitor therapy works with the body's immune system to determine if there are ways to predict or mitigate associated adverse effects. (2020-07-14)
Study calls for action to protect BAME and migrant groups from economic impact of COVID-19
The COVID-19 lockdown has had a disproportionate economic impact on Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) migrants in the UK, new research, which also calls for racial justice, reveals today. (2020-07-13)
Deep learning enables early detection and classification of live bacteria using holography
Rapid identification of the presence of pathogenic bacteria in food, water, or bodily fluid samples is very important and yet extremely challenging. (2020-07-13)
Aquaculture's role in nutrition in the COVID-19 era
A new paper from American University examines the economics of an aquaculture industry of the future that is simultaneously environmentally sustainable and nutritious for the nearly 1 billion people worldwide who depend on it. (2020-07-09)
"Protect 30% of the planet for nature," scientists urge in new report
A new report entitled, ''Protecting 30% of the planet for nature: costs, benefits, and economic implications,'' represents the first multi-sector analysis that assesses the global impacts of terrestrial and marine protected areas across the nature conservation, agriculture, forestry, and fisheries sectors. (2020-07-08)
1.5 billion people will depend on water from mountains
Global water consumption has increased almost fourfold in the past 100 years, and many regions can only meet their water demand thanks to essential contributions from mountain regions. (2020-07-07)
Blocking cholesterol storage could stop growth of pancreatic tumors
Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory found they can stop the growth of pancreatic cancer cells by interfering with the way the cells store cholesterol. (2020-07-07)
Global threats: How lessons from COVID-19 can prevent environmental meltdown
COVID-19, climate emergencies, and mass extinction all share striking similarities, especially with regard to their 'lagged impacts.' In each, early intervention can prevent further damage. (2020-07-02)
A shake-up in cell culturing: Flame sterilization may affect the culture
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that flame-sterilizing shake-flasks, to avoid introducing microbial contaminants, considerably increases the carbon dioxide concentration in the flasks. (2020-07-01)
Coronavirus: Social distancing accepted when people understand exponential growth
Experiments among U.S. population show: When people fail to see the need for restrictions on public life, explaining the exponential increase of infections creates greater acceptance for measures taken to slow down the infection rate. (2020-06-29)
Ethnolinguistic diversity slows down urban growth
Where various ethnic groups live together, cities grow at a slower rate. (2020-06-29)
Global economic stability could be difficult to recover in the wake of the COVID-19, finds study
Analysis from the University of Surrey suggests that the economies of countries such as America, the United Kingdom and Germany should prepare for a long slow recovery with prolonged periods of instability. (2020-06-26)
Electricity price more volatile during uncertainty periods in renewable energy regulation
Incorporating renewable energies into the electricity system entails a certain degree of volatility in the electricity price owing to the intermittent nature of generation by plants of this type. (2020-06-25)
Economic alien plants more likely to go wild
An international team of researchers led by University of Konstanz ecologist Mark van Kleunen has compiled a global overview of the naturalization success of economic plants, showing that economic use in general, as well as the number and nature of economic uses, are crucial to their establishment in the wild. (2020-06-24)
Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan in input-output analysis
Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan was examined in IOA. (2020-06-24)
Overconsumption and growth economy key drivers of environmental crises
If we want to mitigate and solve the many global environmental issues the world is facing, we can't rely on technology alone, scientists have warned. (2020-06-19)
Ancient societies hold lessons for modern cities
Today's modern cities, from Denver to Dubai, could learn a thing or two from the ancient Pueblo communities that once stretched across the southwestern United States. (2020-06-19)
The balancing act between plant growth and defense
Kumamoto University researchers have pinpointed the mechanism that regulates the balance between plant growth and defense. (2020-06-16)
Researchers discover what's behind nature's perhaps largest erection -- which is not that big
In the plant kingdom, the sexual organ of a male pollen grain grows up to a thousand times its own length as it sniffs its way forth to a female egg cell to deliver its two sperm cells. (2020-06-15)
Intelligence is impacted if born small for gestational age
People born small for gestational age (SGA) have a lower IQ throughout development, however the differences in IQ to those born appropriate for gestational age (AGA) reduce by adulthood. (2020-06-15)
State-level R&D tax credits spur growth of new businesses
Here's some good news for US states trying to spur an economic recovery in the years ahead: The R&D tax credit has a significant effect on entrepreneurship, according to a new study led by an MIT professor. (2020-06-12)
Nutraceuticals for promoting longevity
The review, published in Current Nutraceuticals, offers a special focus on the nutraceuticals that impact insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling and sirtuin activity in mediating longevity and healthspan. (2020-06-10)
Climate change: Warm springtime's unwelcome legacy
A new study shows that the severe impact of the summer drought that hit Europe in 2018 was partly due to the spring heatwave that preceded it, which triggered early and rapid plant growth, depleting soil moisture. (2020-06-10)
Scientists warn against 'greenwashing' of global coastal developments
An international team of scientists has said the artificial structures and reclaimed land that are now commonplace in coastal urban areas all over the world are often poor surrogates for the natural environment they replace. (2020-06-09)
Using multiomics in an agricultural field, scientists discover that organic nitrogen plays a key rol
Researchers from a collaboration led by the RIKEN BioResource Science Center in Japan have analyzed agricultural systems using a multiomics approach, and successfully digitalized the complex interactions between plants, microbes and soil in an agricultural field. (2020-06-08)
Replacing GDP with Gross Ecosystem Product reveals value of nature
Replacing Gross Domestic Product (GDP) with a new ''ecosystem'' measure reveals the enormous value of the natural world, new research shows. (2020-06-08)
Giving GDP a needed ecological companion
Gross ecosystem product (GEP) summarizes the economic value of nature's contributions to humans. (2020-06-08)
The state of China's climate in 2019: Warmer and wetter, but less loss
The National Climate Center (NCC) of China has just completed a report in which it provides an authoritative assessment of China's climate in 2019 based on the NCC's operational system. (2020-06-08)
Tulane scientists find a switch to flip and turn off breast cancer growth and metastasis
Researchers at Tulane University School of Medicine identified a gene that causes an aggressive form of breast cancer to rapidly grow. (2020-06-02)
Economic Development Quarterly announces a special issue on business incentives
Local and state policymakers push economic development incentives to spur job creation and economic wealth. (2020-06-02)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Our Relationship With Water
We need water to live. But with rising seas and so many lacking clean water – water is in crisis and so are we. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around restoring our relationship with water. Guests on the show include legal scholar Kelsey Leonard, artist LaToya Ruby Frazier, and community organizer Colette Pichon Battle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#568 Poker Face Psychology
Anyone who's seen pop culture depictions of poker might think statistics and math is the only way to get ahead. But no, there's psychology too. Author Maria Konnikova took her Ph.D. in psychology to the poker table, and turned out to be good. So good, she went pro in poker, and learned all about her own biases on the way. We're talking about her new book "The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Uncounted
First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it's not a state, and it wasn't until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further? This episode was reported and produced by Julia Longoria and Sarah Qari. Check out Latif Nasser's new Netflix show Connected here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.