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Current Economists News and Events, Economists News Articles.
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Paid sick leave mandates hold promise in containing COVID-19
Paid sick leave (PSL) mandates like those found in the federal government's Families First Coronavirus Response Act may be helping to slow the spread of COVID-19, according to a new study by health economists at Georgia State and Tulane universities. (2020-05-29)
Economists: Lack of COVID-19 preparedness in line with previous findings
The threat of a catastrophic pandemic in 2014 -- the West African Ebola outbreak -- did little to change the perception of US citizens regarding the importance of preparing for future outbreaks, (2020-05-14)
Robots help some firms, even while workers across industries struggle
A new study co-authored by an MIT professor reveals an important pattern: Firms that move quickly to use robots tend to add workers to their payroll, while industry job losses are more concentrated in firms that make this change more slowly. (2020-05-05)
Memory misfires help selfish maintain their self-image
When asked to recall how generous they were in the past, selfish people tend to remember being more benevolent than they actually were, according to a series of experiments by Yale psychologists and economists at University of Zurich published April 29, 2020 in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-04-29)
A new explanation for the origins of human fatherhood
The origins of paternal care, a key differentiator between humans and other primates, have long been tied to ancestral females trading their own sexual fidelity for food provided by their mates. (2020-04-27)
Stanford study reveals a holistic way to measure the economic fallout from earthquakes
Officials know how to account for deaths, injuries and property damages after the shaking stops, but a study in Nature Sustainability, based on a hypothetical 7.2 magnitude quake near San Francisco, describes the first way to estimate the far greater financial fallout that such a disaster would have, especially on the poor. (2020-04-20)
Mentoring programs help female economists secure tenure-track positions
Research from Princeton University shows that an annual AEA workshop for female economists was effective in retaining women in academia and helping them to achieve tenure in the top 30 to 50 ranked schools in the country. (2020-04-16)
The retention effect of training
Company training increases the loyalty of its employees. Loyalty also increases if the training improves the employees' chances on the labour market. (2020-04-15)
Economists find carbon footprint grows with parenthood
Two-adult households with children emit over 25% more carbon dioxide than two-adult households without children, according to researchers with the University of Wyoming and Sweden's Lund University School of Economics and Management. (2020-04-15)
US coronavirus measures are justified, University of Wyoming economists find
The potential benefits of social distancing in saving lives far outweigh the projected damage to the economy, according to the economists from the Department of Economics in the University of Wyoming College of Business. (2020-04-14)
Public policies that target crime reduction around parks can directly benefit communities
Public parks can be valuable assets for communities, but crime in the area can 'lock up' that amenity value. (2020-04-14)
When what-if scenarios turn real: CSU pandemic modeler providing new COVID-19 insights
School closures are intended to slow the transmission of the coronavirus. (2020-04-03)
New dataset reveals trends in social scientists' congressional testimony
From 1946 to 2016, testimony from economists accounted for more than two thirds of all instances of US congressional testimony delivered by social scientists. (2020-03-25)
Long-term analysis shows GM cotton no match for insects in India
In India, Bt cotton is the most widely planted cotton crop by acreage, and it is hugely controversial. (2020-03-13)
Moving beyond 'defensive medicine'
Study shows removing liability concerns slightly increases C-section procedures during childbirth. (2020-03-12)
Why are workers getting smaller pieces of the pie?
Market concentration in the form of 'superstar' firms has been lowering labor's share of GDP in recent decades, a new study finds. (2020-03-11)
Researchers gather interventions addressing 'word gap' into special edition of journa
Investigators at the University of Kansas edited a special issue of Early Childhood Research Quarterly gathering 18 language-intervention research and empirical studies that address the word gap. (2020-03-04)
The case for economics -- by the numbers
In recent years, criticism has been levelled at economics for being insular and unconcerned about real-world problems. (2020-03-03)
Having fewer children reduced the education gap in China
A new study uses China's one-child policy to show that having fewer children leads women to achieve higher levels of education. (2020-02-12)
How China's one-child policy helped shrink the education gap
A new study uses China's one-child policy to show that having fewer children leads women to achieve higher levels of education.The research found that the one-child policy alone accounted for about half of the additional education that women in China achieved after the policy was put in place. (2020-02-10)
Words matter when it comes to apparel for people living with disabilitie
Brands should consider the language they use when marketing products to this group of consumers, according to a new study from the University of Missouri. (2020-02-06)
Measuring the world of social phenomena
Economists working with Professor Marko Sarstedt from University of Magdeburg are demanding that the same scientific standards be applied to economics and the behavioral sciences in general as are used in the natural sciences. (2020-01-20)
People view rationality and reasonableness as distinct principles of judgment
When it comes to making sound judgements, most people understand and distinguish that being rational is self-serving and being reasonable is fair and balanced, finds new research from the University of Waterloo. (2020-01-08)
Trump's protectionism raises unemployment
The protectionist policy of US President Donald Trump is criticized on all sides around the world, but seems to suit the Americans, who see this economic model as protecting their interests. (2019-12-17)
Pharmacy service will save NHS £651 million
A research team from the Universities of Manchester, Nottingham, and UCL evaluating a service delivered by pharmacists since 2011 have calculated it will save the English NHS around £651 million. (2019-12-02)
Efficient, but not without help
HSE University economists analyzed what banks performed best on the Russian market from 2004 to 2015 - state, private, or foreign -owned ones. (2019-11-14)
Does crime increase when the moon is full?
Noting that anecdotal beliefs can affect public policies and practices, a 'pracademics' team from NYU's Marron Institute of Urban Management worked with public safety personnel to examine the commonly held axiom that crime rises with the full moon -- and found that the evidence is just not there. (2019-10-30)
New study debunks myth that only children are more narcissistic than kids with siblings
The stereotype that only children are selfish, or more self-centered than those with siblings is sometimes used as an argument for having more than one child, but researchers from Germany find there's no evidence for the claim that only children are more narcissistic than children with sibling. (2019-10-15)
New report: Men without work face a worrying well-being crisis
A new IZA World of Labor report publishing tomorrow (Oct. (2019-10-02)
Deworming programmes for soil-transmitted helminths -- a Cochrane review update
Should global government and philanthropic aid be invested in large public health deworming programmes in low- and middle-income countries? (2019-09-11)
Magdeburg researchers refute theory of collective (non-)action
The theory of collective action states that there is no incentive for individuals in large groups to participate in the provision of work for public benefit. (2019-08-12)
Spread-changing orders and deletions affect stock prices
In a new study published in EPJ B, Stephan Grimm and Thomas Guhr from Duisburg-Essen University in Germany compare the influences that three price-changing events have on these spread changes. (2019-07-18)
Study: Minimum wage 'an effective tool' for increasing incomes of older workers
In an era of rising inequality and aging populations in the US, the effect of the minimum wage on the labor market for older workers is increasingly important, says new research from Mark Borgschulte, a professor of economics at Illinois. (2019-07-10)
People globally return 'lost' wallets more as money increases
In a study of how people in 40 countries decided to return (or not) 'lost' wallets, researchers were surprised to find that -- in contrast to classic economic logic -- people returned the wallets holding the greater amounts of money more often. (2019-06-20)
Inconsistent choice-making a normal part of how the brain evaluates options
Sometimes consumers will switch their preferences, known in industry terms as 'customer churn.' While economists have previously called that an error in rationality, a new study says an important part of inconsistent choice-making is due to idiosyncratic activity in the brain areas that assess value. (2019-05-28)
Creativity: A question of impulsiveness
How can employees' working time be organized so as to enable them to perform in the best possible way when completing both creative and routine tasks? (2019-05-23)
Economists find net benefit in soda tax
A team of economists has concluded that soda taxes serve as a 'net good,' an assessment based on an analysis of health benefits and consumer behavior. (2019-05-20)
Creativity is not just for the young, study finds
If you believe that great scientists are most creative when they're young, you are missing part of the story. (2019-04-26)
Auction bids decline with intensity of competition: new research
People bid less in auctions that have more bidders, new research suggests. (2019-04-15)
Berkeley's soda tax election changed drinking habits months before prices went up
Berkeley's soda tax election may have played a major role in changing drinking habits in the city, a new study shows. (2019-04-02)
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