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Current Ecosystem News and Events

Current Ecosystem News and Events, Ecosystem News Articles.
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Study reveals strongest predictors of menhaden growth in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic
New research suggests that large-scale environmental factors influence the size of one of the ocean's most abundant forage species. (2020-04-08)
Changes to drylands with future climate change
While drylands around the world will expand at an accelerated rate because of future climate change, their average productivity will likely be reduced, according to a new study. (2020-04-03)
Lacustrine ecosystems needed 10 million years to recover after end-permian mass extinction
A research team led by Prof. WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) found that both lake and peat-forming forest ecosystems probably took as long as 10 million years to recover after the end-Permian mass extinction. (2020-04-03)
Six million-year-old bird skeleton points to arid past of Tibetan plateau
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have found a new species of sandgrouse in six to nine million-year-old rocks in Gansu Province in western China. (2020-04-01)
Ecosystem services are not constrained by borders
What do chocolate, migratory birds, flood control and pandas have in common? (2020-03-30)
Shedding light on how much carbon tropical forests can absorb
Tropical forest ecosystems are an important part of the global carbon cycle as they take up and store large amounts of CO2. (2020-03-19)
SUTD develops missing link to circular economy while tackling global waste
Urban waste and bio-inspired engineering provide key ingredients to 3D printed bioplastic, allowing for global adoption of sustainable manufacturing processes. (2020-03-13)
Remote South American kelp forests surveyed for first time since 1973
In the kelp forests of Tierra del Fuego, at the southernmost tip of South America, the relative abundance of kelp, sea urchins, and sea stars has not changed significantly since 1973. (2020-03-11)
Planet's largest ecosystems collapse faster than previously forecast
New research has shown that large ecosystems such as rainforests and coral reefs can collapse at a significantly faster rate than previously understood. (2020-03-10)
Amazon rainforest could be gone within a lifetime
Writing in Nature Communications, researchers from Bangor University, Southampton University and The School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London, reveal the speed at which ecosystems of different sizes will disappear, once they have reached a point beyond which they collapse -- transforming into an alternative ecosystem. (2020-03-10)
Birds of a feather better not together
A new study of North American birds from Washington University in St. (2020-03-04)
Waves and tides have bigger impact on marine life than human activity
The biggest impacts on the sea life in Swansea Bay (Wales) come from waves and tides rather than human activity, a wide-ranging new study -- encompassing over 170 species of fish and other sea life such as crabs, squid and starfish -- has revealed. (2020-03-04)
More than 60% of Myanmar's mangroves has been deforested in the last 20 years: NUS study
New research from the National University of Singapore showed that between 1996 and 2016, substantial mangrove forests have been converted to agricultural use in Myanmar. (2020-03-03)
Ancient Australian trees face uncertain future under climate change, study finds
Tasmania's ancient rainforest faces a grim future as a warming climate and the way people used the land have brought significant changes to the island state off mainland Australia's southeastern coast, according to a new Portland State University study (2020-03-03)
Directed species loss from species-rich forests strongly decreases productivity
At high species richness, directed loss, but not random loss, of tree species strongly decreases forest productivity. (2020-03-02)
Roadmap to a win-win against invasive weeds
Researchers at Wits University in Johannesburg, South Africa, have created the world's first framework, to better guide the management of terrestrial invasive species. (2020-02-27)
Eat or be eaten
Plants obtain their energy from the sun. Other beings rely on eating to survive. (2020-02-26)
Super-urinators among the mangroves: Excretory gifts from estuary's busiest fish promote ecosystem health
A new University of Michigan-led study of individually radio-tracked tropical fish in a Bahamian mangrove estuary highlights the importance of highly active individuals in maintaining ecosystem health. (2020-02-26)
Helpful interactions can keep societies stable
University of Pennsylvania biologists have challenged old notions that communities with mutualistic interactions--where the presence of one species benefits another--are unstable. (2020-02-26)
Rules of life: From a pond to the beyond
In a recent study published in the journal eLIFE a team of researchers, including lead author Jordan Okie of Arizona State University's School of Earth and Space Exploration and senior author Jim Elser of the School of Life Sciences, conducted experiments in the Cuatro Cienegas Basin in Mexico. (2020-02-18)
Major study shows climate change can cause abrupt impacts on dryland ecosystems
A study finds for the first time that as levels of aridity increase due to climate change, abrupt changes are experienced on dryland ecosystems. (2020-02-14)
Nitrogen-fixing trees help tropical forests grow faster and store more carbon
New research published in Nature Communications shows that the ability of tropical forests to lock up carbon depends critically upon a group of trees that possess a unique talent -- the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere. (2020-02-13)
New research shows that El Niño contributes to insect collapse in the Amazon
Hotter and drier El Niño events are having an alarming effect on biodiversity in the Amazon Rainforest and further add to a disturbing global insect collapse, scientists show. (2020-02-09)
HKU team identifies areas of top priority for deep-sea monitoring
Responses were collected from 112 leading deep-sea scientists around the world regarding deep-sea monitoring, conservation and management by an international research team. (2020-02-07)
Save the giants, save the planet
Protecting large animals such as elephants and whales, and large plants like the sequoias, has a disproportionate positive impact on the health of the planet and resilience to climate change. (2020-02-04)
Biological diversity as a factor of production
Can the biodiversity of ecosystems be considered a factor of production? (2020-01-30)
Yale-NUS research shows airborne microbes link Great Barrier Reef and Australian continent
A team of researchers led by Yale-NUS College Professor of Science (Environmental Studies) Stephen Pointing has discovered a link between two different ecosystems, continental Australia and the Great Barrier Reef, due to airborne microbes that travel from the former to the latter. (2020-01-29)
Drug lord's hippos make their mark on foreign ecosystem
UC San Diego scientists and their colleagues have published the first scientific assessment of the impact that an invasive hippo population, imported by infamous drug lord Pablo Escobar, is having on Colombian aquatic ecosystems. (2020-01-29)
A strong foundation
Anyone who's read 'The Lorax' will recognize that certain species serve as the foundation of their ecosystems. (2020-01-29)
Helping prevent eco-interventions from backfiring
Drastic ecosystem interventions like eradicating an unwanted species can sometimes backfire, but new University of Queensland-led modelling may help to avoid these ecological hiccups. (2020-01-28)
Making 'lemonade': Chance observation leads to study of microbial bloom formation
A team from the Microbial Diversity course at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass., studied a brackish, shallow lagoon over time and found it releases hydrogen sulfide, particularly upon physical disturbance, causing blooms of anoxygenic sulfur-oxidizing phototrophs. (2020-01-23)
Research supports new approach to mine reclamation
Geomorphic reclamation is a relatively novel approach intended to mimic the topography of nearby undisturbed lands, with a wide variety of terrain that is stable and less susceptible to erosion. (2020-01-21)
Platypus on brink of extinction
New UNSW research calls for national action to minimise the risk of the platypus vanishing due to habitat destruction, dams and weirs. (2020-01-21)
To reverse engineer dynamics of microbial communities, researchers construct their own
Scientific and public appreciation for microbes -- and the key role their communal actions play in environmental health, food production, and human wellness -- has grown in recent years. (2020-01-21)
Caterpillar loss in tropical forest linked to extreme rain, temperature events
Using a 22-year dataset of plant-caterpillar-parasitoid interactions collected within a patch of protected Costa Rican lowland Caribbean forest, scientists report declines in caterpillar and parasitoid diversity and density that are paralleled by losses in an important ecosystem service: biocontrol of herbivores by parasitoids. (2020-01-21)
Tracking the scent of warming tundra
Climate change is causing the subarctic tundra to warm twice as fast as the global average, and this warming is speeding up the activity of the plant life. (2020-01-20)
Microplastics affect sand crabs' mortality and reproduction, PSU study finds
Sand crabs, a key species in beach ecosystems, were found to have increased adult mortality and decreased reproductive success when exposed to plastic microfibers, according to a new Portland State University study. (2020-01-17)
Global database of all bird species shows how body shape predicts lifestyle
A database of 10,000 bird species shows how measurements of wings, beaks and tails can predict a species' role in an ecosystem. (2020-01-13)
Connector fungi offer new clues to fate of nitrogen in warming tundra
Northern Arizona University researchers Rebecca Hewitt and Michelle Mack authored a paper, published this week in New Phytologist, that could have implications for researchers and computer models that predict where nitrogen and carbon go at both regional and global levels. (2020-01-13)
Biodiversity has substantially changed in one of the largest Mediterranean wetlands
The Camargue area in France has considerably fewer grasshopper, cricket, locust, dragonfly, and amphibian species than 40 years ago. (2019-12-19)
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