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Current Ecosystems News and Events

Current Ecosystems News and Events, Ecosystems News Articles.
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Sea level rise requires extra management to maintain salt marshes
Salt marshes are important habitats for fish and birds and protect coasts under sea level rise against stronger wave attacks. (2019-07-17)
Pokémon-like card game can help teach ecology: UBC research
Playing a Pokémon-like card game about ecology and biodiversity can result in broader knowledge of species and a better understanding of ecosystems than traditional teaching methods, like slideshows, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. (2019-07-17)
Protected area designation effective in reducing, but not preventing, land cover changes
The designation of protected areas in Europe has been effective in reducing, but not completely preventing, land cover changes associated with human activity, according to a study published July 17, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Niels Hellwig of Potsdam University and Osnabrück University of Applied Sciences in Germany, and colleagues. (2019-07-17)
Better river basins network to protect biodiversity in Spain
The European eel (Anguilla anguilla), the freshwater blenny (Salaria fluviatilis), the freshwater pearl mussel (Margaritifera auricularia) and the pronged clubtail (Gomphus graslini) are some of the vulnerable species that are not represented enough in the biodiversity catalogue of the Natural River Basins (RNF) in Spain. (2019-07-15)
Coral reefs shifting away from equator
Coral reefs are retreating from equatorial waters and establishing new reefs in more temperate regions, according to new research in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. (2019-07-09)
Human waste an asset to economy, environment, study finds
Human waste might be an unpleasant public health burden, but scientists at the University of Illinois see sanitation as a valuable facet of global ecosystems and an overlooked source of nutrients, organic material and water. (2019-07-08)
Environmental destruction linked to African population raises questions about family sizes
Africa is projected to be home to nearly 3 billion people by 2100, but rapid population growth will cause widespread environmental degradation unless effective family planning becomes widespread policy, according to new research that tracked increased population pressures on the continent's ecosystems. (2019-06-26)
Research details response of sagebrush to 2017 solar eclipse
The short period of darkness caused a significant reduction in photosynthesis and transpiration in the desert shrub, but not quite to the levels of nighttime, according to some of the most detailed research on plant response to solar eclipses ever reported. (2019-06-20)
Researchers call for change to river management and modelling
A team of international experts including La Trobe University ecologist Nick Bond, led by the University of Canterbury, are calling for urgent global change to how we manage and model river ecosystems. (2019-06-19)
Antarctic marine life recovery following the dinosaurs' extinction
A new study shows how marine life around Antarctica returned after the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs. (2019-06-19)
FEFU scientist reported on concentration of pesticides in marine organisms
According to ecotoxicologist from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), from the 90s and during 2000s in the tissues of Russian Far Eastern mussels the concentration of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) that had been globally used in agriculture in the mid-twentieth century has increased about ten times. (2019-06-19)
Changing how we predict coral bleaching
A remote sensing algorithm offers better predictions of Red Sea coral bleaching and can be fine tuned for use in other tropical marine ecosystems. (2019-06-18)
Researchers lay out plan for managing rivers for climate change
New strategies for river management are needed to maintain water supplies and avoid big crashes in populations of aquatic life, researchers argue in a perspective piece published today in Nature. (2019-06-18)
New evidence shows rapid response in the West Greenland landscape to Arctic climate shifts
Evidence from an Arctic ecosystem experiencing rapid climate change reveals surprisingly tight coupling of environmental responses to climate shifts. (2019-06-18)
New study shows how climate change could affect impact of roundworms on grasslands
The researchers found in extreme drought conditions that predator nematodes significantly decreased, which led to the growth of root-feeding nematodes. (2019-06-10)
Rapid change in coral reefs prompts global calls for a rethink
Coral reef experts from around the world are calling for an urgent re-evaluation of our climate goals in the light of increasing evidence of unprecedented speed of change to these fragile ecosystems. (2019-06-07)
Microorganisms on microplastics
A recent study shows that that the potentially toxin-producing plankton species Pfiesteria piscicida prefers to colonize plastic particles, where they are found in 50 times higher densities than in the surrounding water of the Baltic Sea and densities about two to three times higher than on comparable wood particles floating in the water. (2019-06-05)
Frogs find refuge in elephant tracks
Frogs need elephants. That's what a new WCS-led study says that looked at the role of water-filled elephant tracks in providing predator-free breeding grounds and pathways connecting frog populations. (2019-06-04)
Chasing species' 'intactness'
In an effort to better protect the world's last ecologically intact ecosystems, researchers developed a new metric called 'The Last of the Wild in Each Ecoregion' (LWE), which aimed to quantify the most intact parts of each ecoregion. (2019-05-31)
Godzilla is back and he's bigger than ever: The evolutionary biology of the monster
Godzilla first made his debut in 1954 as a 50-meter tall metaphor for indiscriminate destruction, particularly US hydrogen-bomb testing in the Marshall Islands, which, in the film, destroyed Godzilla's deep-sea ecosystem. (2019-05-29)
How to prevent mosquitofish from spreading in water ecosystems
Preventing the introduction of the mosquitofish and removing its population are the most effective actions to control the dispersal of this exotic fish in ponds and lakes, according to a study published in the journal Science of the Total Environment. (2019-05-24)
Surprise: The survival of coral reefs hinges on the hidden lives of the sea's tiniest fishes
The survival of coral reef ecosystems and their menagerie of rainbowed residents relies on seldom seen, historically overlooked cryptobenthic reef fishes -- the smallest of marine vertebrates. (2019-05-23)
Size is everything
The susceptibility of ecosystems to disruption depends on a lot of factors that can't all be grasped. (2019-05-20)
Shedding light on the key determinants of global land use projections
Land use is at the core of various sustainable development goals. (2019-05-16)
Research brief: Protecting rare species can benefit human life
Preserving rare species for the sake of global biodiversity has long been the primary focus for conservationists. (2019-05-16)
New research identifies patterns of tree distribution in African savannas
According to a new study published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, airborne surveys show that, on a large scale, the spatial arrangement of savanna trees follows distinct patterns that can be described mathematically regardless of variation in environmental factors. (2019-05-14)
New UM study highlights fundamental challenges of living with wildfire
Wildfires can have dramatic impacts on Western landscapes and communities, but human values determine whether the changes caused by fire are desired or dreaded. (2019-05-10)
New clues to coastal erosion
New research has uncovered a missing nutrient source in coastal oceans, which could promote better water quality and sand management on popular beaches. (2019-05-01)
Flowering plants, new teeth and no dinosaurs: New study sheds light on the rise of mammals
A new study has identified three factors critical in the rise of mammal communities since they first emerged during the Age of Dinosaurs: the rise of flowering plants; the evolution of tribosphenic molars in mammals; and the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs, which reduced competition between mammals and other vertebrates in terrestrial ecosystems. (2019-04-30)
Natural landscapes? Scientists call for a paradigm shift in restoration projects
Regardless of whether we are dealing with a floodplain landscape or an entire national park, the success of a restoration project depends on more than just the reintroduction of individual plant or animal species into an area. (2019-04-25)
Can we solve the riddle of the coral reef halos?
Patches of coral reef are often surrounded by very large 'halos' of bare sand that are hundreds to thousands of square meters. (2019-04-24)
Study reveals vast diversity of ocean microbes
Advanced molecular techniques have revealed the diversity of a little-understood group of ocean microbes called protists, according to a new publication in Scientific Reports. (2019-04-24)
Global warming hits sea creatures hardest
Global warming has caused twice as many ocean-dwelling species as land-dwelling species to disappear from their habitats, a unique Rutgers-led study found. (2019-04-24)
Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore
Paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. (2019-04-18)
Neotropical cloud forests to lose what most defines them: clouds
In as few as 25 years, climate change could shrink and dry 60-80% of Western Hemisphere cloud forests, finds a study published today. (2019-04-17)
Bacterial mix helps predict future change
Understanding how bacterial metacommunities homogenize could help scientists predict future changes to ecosystems. (2019-04-16)
Bacteria surrounding coral reefs change in synchrony, even across great distance
A study published in Nature Communications revealed that the bacteria present in the water overlying dozens of coral reefs changed dramatically during the night, and then returned to the same daytime community as observed the morning before. (2019-04-12)
Global study shows exotic species are a complex threat
Researchers disentangle the effects of introduced species on the marine environment. (2019-04-08)
Plant diversity increases insect diversity
The more plant species live in grasslands and forests, the more insect species find a habitat there. (2019-04-08)
New study questions effects of reintroducing top predators
There's little evidence that reintroducing top predators to ecosystems will return them to the conditions that existed before they were wiped out, according to new research. (2019-04-03)
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