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Current Ecosystems News and Events

Current Ecosystems News and Events, Ecosystems News Articles.
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Global biodiversity crisis is a large-scale reorganization, with greatest loss in tropical oceans
Local biodiversity of species -- the scale on which humans feel contributions from biodiversity -- is being rapidly reorganized, according to a new global analysis of biodiversity data from more than 200 studies, together representing all major biomes. (2019-10-17)
Mapping global biodiversity change
A new study, published in Science, which focuses on mapping biodiversity change in marine and land ecosystems shows that loss of biodiversity is most prevalent in the tropic, with changes in marine ecosystems outpacing those on land. (2019-10-17)
Making conservation 'contagious'
New research reveals conservation initiatives often spread like disease, a fact which can help scientists and policymakers design programs more likely to be taken up. (2019-10-15)
Scientists 'must be allowed to cry' about destruction of nature
Scientists witnessing the destruction of the natural world must be supported and 'allowed to cry,' researchers say. (2019-10-10)
Researchers find multiple effects on soil from manure from cows administered antibiotics
A new study found multiple effects on soils from exposure to manure from cows administered antibiotics, including alteration of the soil microbiome and ecosystem functions, soil respiration and elemental cycling. (2019-10-09)
Early humans evolved in ecosystems unlike any found today
To understand the environmental pressures that shaped human evolution, scientists must reconstruct the ecosystems in which they lived. (2019-10-07)
Global danger
Freiburg hydrologist presents new results showing how sinking groundwater levels threaten the vitality of riverine ecosystems (2019-10-04)
UNH researchers find northern forests have lost crucial cold, snowy conditions
Winter conditions are changing more rapidly than any other season and researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found clear signs of a decline in frost days, snow covered days and other indicators of winter that could have lasting impacts on ecosystems, water supplies, the economy, tourism and human health. (2019-10-03)
Microscopic evidence sheds light on the disappearance of the world's largest mammals
Understanding the causes and consequences of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions is increasingly important in a world of growing human populations and climate change. (2019-10-02)
Seagrass meadows harbor wildlife for centuries, highlighting need for conservation
Seagrass meadows put down deep roots, persisting in the same spot for hundreds and possibly thousands of years, a new study shows. (2019-10-02)
New research puts Australia at forefront of blue carbon economy
For the first time, scientist have accurately measured the amount of carbon dioxide being absorbed by marine ecosystems in Australia. (2019-10-01)
Preparing for the future
Santa Barbara County residents love their coastline, from the small-town beaches of Carpinteria to Santa Barbara's waterfront to camping hotspots like Jalama Beach and dramatic Guadalupe Dunes. (2019-09-30)
Anthropologist contributes to major study of large animal extinction
University of Arkansas anthropology assistant professor Amelia VillaseƱor contributed a large, multi-institutional study explaining how the human-influenced mass extinction of giant carnivores and herbivores of North America fundamentally changed the biodiversity and landscape of the continent. (2019-09-20)
Division by subtraction: Extinction of large mammal species likely drove survivors apart
A new study in Science suggests that the extinctions of mammoths, dire wolves and other large mammal species in North America drove surviving species to distance themselves from their neighbors, reducing interactions as predators and prey, territorial competitors or scavengers. (2019-09-19)
Preventing climate change cheaper than dealing with its damage
World leaders need to urgently accelerate efforts to prevent 'profound, if not catastrophic' climate change in future, a distinguished group of scientists has warned. (2019-09-19)
Hurricane Nicole sheds light on how storms impact deep ocean
2016's Hurricane Nicole had a significant effect on the ocean's carbon cycle and deep sea ecosystems, reports a team from the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, and the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences. (2019-09-19)
Ecologists find strong evidence of fishing down the food web in freshwater lake
Research by ecologists at the University of Toronto and Ontario's Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry shows strong evidence in a freshwater lake of ''fishing down the food web'' - the deliberate shift away from top predatory fish on the food chain to smaller species closer to the base. (2019-09-18)
Fungicides as an underestimated hazard for freshwater organisms
Large amounts of fungicides, used in agriculture, leak into nearby surface waters. (2019-09-17)
Study: We need more realistic experiments on the impact of climate change on ecosystems
When it comes to the impact of climate change on ecosystems, we still have large knowledge gaps. (2019-09-16)
Special issue, 'mountain life,' celebrates Alexander von Humboldt's lasting legacy
Alexander von Humboldt was born 250 years ago this month, and while he spent much of his life studying Earth's mountainous regions, his vision of how science is intertwined with the broader human experience has helped to lay the groundwork for aspects of modern science more broadly. (2019-09-12)
Soil scientist researches nature versus nurture in microorganisms
Ember Morrissey, assistant professor of environmental microbiology at West Virginia University, uncovered that nature significantly affects how the tiny organisms under our feet respond to their current surroundings. (2019-09-11)
Soils could be affected by climate change, impacting water and food
Coasts, oceans, ecosystems, weather and human health all face impacts from climate change, and now valuable soils may also be affected. (2019-09-11)
Digital records of preserved plants and animals change how scientists explore the world
There's a whole world behind the scenes at natural history museums that most people never see -- millions upon millions of dinosaur bones, pickled sharks, dried leaves, and every other part of the natural world.These specimens are used in research by scientists trying to understand how different kinds of life evolved and how we can protect them. (2019-09-11)
A precise chemical fingerprint of the Amazon
This novel drone-based chemical monitoring system tracks the health of the Amazon in the face of global climate change and human-caused deforestation and burning. (2019-09-11)
Climate change water variability hurts salamander populations
New research from the University of Montana suggests that streamflow variability brought on by climate change will negatively affect the survival of salamanders. (2019-09-06)
From the tropics to the boreal, temperature drives ecosystem functioning
University of Arizona researchers found a tight link between temperature and plant and microbe communities within forests, which will allow them to predict how ecosystems might respond to climate changes. (2019-09-04)
How much carbon the land can stomach with more carbon dioxide in the air
Researchers from 28 institutions in nine countries succeeded in quantifying carbon dioxide fertilization for the past five decades, using simulations from 12 terrestrial ecosystem models and observations from seven field carbon dioxide enrichment experiments. (2019-09-02)
What if we paid countries to protect biodiversity?
Researchers from Sweden, Germany, Brazil and the USA have developed a financial mechanism to support the protection of the world's natural heritage. (2019-08-30)
How changes in land use could reduce the browning of lakes
Over the past 50 years, the water in lakes and watercourses has turned increasingly brown. (2019-08-29)
Grassland biodiversity is blowing in the wind
Temperate grasslands are the most endangered but least protected ecosystems on Earth. (2019-08-28)
A lack of background knowledge can hinder reading comprehension
The purpose of going to school is to learn, but students may find certain topics difficult to understand if they don't have the necessary background knowledge. (2019-08-26)
Salt marshes' capacity to sink carbon may be threatened by nitrogen pollution
Salt marshes sequester carbon at rates an order of magnitude higher than land ecosystems. (2019-08-23)
Environmental DNA proves the expansion of invasive crayfish habitats
Environmental DNA (eDNA) has successfully proven the presence of invasive crayfish in almost all the small streams around Lake Akan in Japan, suggesting that eDNA analysis is an efficient and highly sensitive method to assess the distribution of aquatic organisms. (2019-08-21)
88% decline of big freshwater animals
Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now quantified the global decline of big freshwater animals: from 1970 to 2012, global populations of freshwater megafauna declined by 88% -- twice the loss of vertebrate populations on land or in the ocean. (2019-08-08)
When invasive plants take root, native animals pay the price
Jacob Barney, associate professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences' School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, graduate researcher Becky Fletcher, and a team of five other doctoral students conducted the first-ever comprehensive meta-analytic review examining the ecological impacts of invasive plants by exploring how animals -- indigenous and exotic -- respond to these nonnative plants. (2019-08-08)
Medication in the environment affects feeding behavior of fish
Scientists are increasingly warning that prescription drugs can affect wildlife and ecosystems when they find their way into the environment. (2019-08-07)
New study: Ocean temperature 'surprises' becoming more common
Around the world, periods of rapid ocean warming are happening more often than we thought. (2019-08-05)
Discovery of non-blooming orchid on Japanese subtropical islands
A group of Japanese scientists has discovered a new orchid species on Japan's subtropical islands of Amami-Oshima and Tokunoshima that bears fruit without once opening its flowers. (2019-08-02)
The urbanization of the beach
Some of Southern California's most iconic and popular beaches have lost most of their biodiversity, according to marine scientists. (2019-07-31)
Research finds connecting patients with their community could transform healthcare
Engaging a wider range of resources to connect patients with organizations within their community can help transform healthcare and improve overall well-being, according to new research. (2019-07-25)
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