Current Electricity News and Events

Current Electricity News and Events, Electricity News Articles.
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New device offers faster way to detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria
A new device for faster testing of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has been developed by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-12-01)

Hydrogen-powered heavy duty vehicles could contribute significantly to achieving climate goals
A partial transition of German road transport to hydrogen energy is among the possibilities being discussed to help meet national climate targets. Researcher from the IASS have examined the hypothetical transition to a hydrogen-powered transport sector through several scenarios. Their conclusion: A shift towards hydrogen-powered mobility could significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions and greatly improve air quality - in particular, heavy duty vehicles represent a low-hanging fruit for decarbonization of German road transport. (2020-12-01)

Curtin collision models impact the future of energy
A new Curtin University-created database of electron-molecule reactions is a major step forward in making nuclear fusion power a reality, by allowing researchers to accurately model plasmas containing molecular hydrogen. (2020-12-01)

UIC researchers identify new process to produce ammonia with a much smaller carbon footprint
Researchers describe a new process to produce ammonia with a potentially much lower carbon footprint. (2020-11-30)

Game changer in thermoelectric materials could unlock body-heat powered personal devices
A breakthrough improvement in ultra?efficient thermoelectric materials, which can convert heat into electricity and vice versa, has great potential for applications ranging from low-maintenance, solid-state refrigeration to compact, zero-carbon power generation--possibly including small, personal devices powered by the body's own heat. Heat 'harvesting' takes advantage of the free, plentiful heat sources provided by body heat, automobiles, everyday living, and industrial process. (2020-11-28)

Stanford scientists invent ultrafast way to manufacture perovskite solar modules
High-speed manufacturing could advance the commercialization of perovskite modules, a green alternative to conventional solar panels made of silicon. (2020-11-25)

New semiconductor coating may pave way for future green fuels
Hydrogen gas and methanol for fuel cells or as raw materials for the chemicals industry, for example, could be produced more sustainably using sunlight, a new Uppsala University study shows. In this study, researchers have developed a new coating material for semiconductors that may create new opportunities to produce fuels in processes that combine direct sunlight with electricity. The study is published in Nature Communications. (2020-11-18)

Handles and holes in abstract spaces: how a material conducts electricity better
A new theory has succeeded in establishing a new relationship between the presence or absence of 'handles' in the space of the arrangements of atoms and molecules that make up a material, and the propensity of the latter to conduct electricity. The insulating materials 'equipped with handles' can conduct electricity as well as metals, while retaining typical properties of insulators, such as transparency. (2020-11-13)

The transformation of a pair: How electrons supertransport current in 'bad metals'
The repulsive forces between the electrons in bad metals are much stronger than in low-temperature superconductors: so how do particles with the same charge overcome these forces and manage to pair-up and to transport current as it happens in ''traditional'' superconductors? According to a new study, in these materials the electrons would transform into new ''objects'', with an unprecedented character that would allow them to superconduct the current. (2020-11-11)

Smart devices to schedule electricity use may prevent blackouts
Power plants generate electricity and send it into power lines that distribute energy to nodes where it can be used. But if the electricity load is more than the system's capacity, transmission can fail, leading to a cascade of failures throughout the electric grid. In the journal Chaos, researchers show demand side control may be an effective solution to stabilizing the reliability of power grids that use a mix of energy generation sources. (2020-11-10)

Swirl power: how gentle body movement will charge your mobile phone
Scientists have discovered a way to generate electricity from nylon - the stretchy fabric used widely in sportswear and other shape-hugging apparel - raising hopes that the clothes on our backs will become an important source of energy. (2020-11-06)

Policy, not tech, spurred Danish dominance in wind energy
In a new study focused on Denmark, a global leader in wind energy - a relatively mature and low-cost renewable technology - researchers found that government policies have been the primary driver of that industry's growth and development. (2020-11-06)

3D print experts discover how to make tomorrow's technology using ink-jet printed graphene
The University of Nottingham has cracked the conundrum of how to use inks to 3D-print novel electronic devices with useful properties, such as an ability to convert light into electricity. (2020-11-04)

Scientists develop method to detect charge traps in organic semiconductors
Scientists at Swansea University have developed a very sensitive method to detect the tiny signatures of so called 'charge traps' in organic semiconductors. (2020-11-04)

Water-energy nanogrid provides solution for rural communities lacking basic amenities
Researchers at Texas A&M University have come up with an economical, green solution that can help underprivileged communities with their water and electricity needs. (2020-11-04)

Solar cells of the future
Organic solar cells are cheaper to produce and more flexible than their counterparts made of crystalline silicon, but do not offer the same level of efficiency or stability. During his doctoral thesis, Andrej Classen, who is a young researcher at FAU, demonstrated that increases in efficiency can be achieved using luminescent acceptor molecules. (2020-11-03)

Thermal vision of snakes inspires soft pyroelectric materials
Converting heat into electricity is a property thought to be reserved only for stiff materials like crystals. However, researchers--inspired by the infrared (IR) vision of snakes--developed a mathematical model for converting soft, organic structures into so-called 'pyroelectric' materials. The study, appearing October 21, 2020 in the journal Matter, proves that soft matter can be transformed into a pyroelectric material and potentially solves a long-held mystery surrounding the mechanism of IR vision in snakes. (2020-10-21)

Cross-party agreement on decarbonization but no master plan for electricity system
Which political parties have the most ambitious climate and energy policies? The answer, according to a new study, is surprising. In Germany, France, Spain and Italy, parties across the political spectrum, from the Greens to the Liberals, show a similar level of ambition on this score. However, researchers have also identified a major impediment to the energy transition: none of the investigated parties has a convincing idea for a technology mix that would ensure grid stability despite weather-related fluctuations in wind and solar energy. (2020-10-20)

Colorful Perovskites: NREL advances thermochromic window technologies
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) report a breakthrough in developing a next-generation thermochromic window that not only reduces the need for air conditioning but simultaneously generates electricity. (2020-10-20)

Paper recycling must be powered by renewables to save climate
The study, published in Nature Sustainability, found that greenhouse gas emissions would increase by 2050 if we recycled more paper, as current methods rely on fossil fuels and electricity from the grid. (2020-10-19)

Winners and losers of energy transition
Drastically reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the electricity sector could have substantial economic and social impacts. Some regions might benefit more than others from new employment opportunities and from reduced air pollution, while others face threats to employment. Such a transition to renewable electricity thus risks creating new regional winners and losers. In a study published in Nature Communications, scientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) quantify regional impacts associated with Central European electricity targets. (2020-10-13)

Mathematical tools predict if wave-energy devices stay afloat in the ocean
Ocean waves represent an abundant source of renewable energy. But to best use this natural resource, wave-energy converters need to be capable of physically handling ocean waves of different strengths without capsizing. (2020-10-13)

Stacking and twisting graphene unlocks a rare form of magnetism
A team of researchers at Columbia University and the University of Washington has discovered that a variety of exotic electronic states, including a rare form of magnetism, can arise in a three-layer graphene structure. (2020-10-12)

People can do more than use less plastic to help save the GBR: QUT research
There are many threats to Australia's Great Barrier Reef - cyclones, shipping, crown-of-thorns starfish - but QUT researchers say climate change is its worst enemy. Yet a survey they conducted found most people don't make a connection between climate change and reef health. They say there is more individuals could do on this front, both in the home and to influence government policies (2020-10-12)

SNew solar panel design could lead to wider use of renewable energy
Researchers say the breakthrough could lead to the production of thinner, lighter and more flexible solar panels that could be used to power more homes and be used in a wider range of products. (2020-10-08)

Sensory device stimulates ears and tongue to treat tinnitus in large trial
A device that stimulates the ears and tongue substantially reduced the severity of tinnitus symptoms in 326 patients for as long as 1 year, while achieving high patient satisfaction and adherence. (2020-10-07)

Climate-friendly cooling to help ease global warming
A new IIASA-led study shows that coordinated international action on energy-efficient, climate-friendly cooling could avoid as much as 600 billion tonnes CO2 equivalent of greenhouse gas emissions in this century. (2020-10-06)

Development of haptic touch sensor that works by static electricity
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a team of researchers led by Dr. Seoung-Ki Lee at the Center for Functional Composite Material Research developed a touch sensor that enhances the triboelectrification efficiency by more than 40% by forming crumple structured molybdenum disulfide through a joint study with Chang-Kyu Jeong, Professor of Advanced Materials Engineering at JeonBuk National University. (2020-10-05)

Two's a crowd: Nuclear and renewables don't mix
If countries want to lower emissions as substantially, rapidly and cost-effectively as possible, they should prioritize support for renewables, rather than nuclear power, the findings of a major new energy study concludes. (2020-10-05)

INRS researchers develop a new membraneless fuel cell
The research team of INRS (Institut national de la recherche scientifique) professor Mohamed Mohamedi has designed a green membraneless fuel cell that uses oxygen from the air. The results of this innovative microfluidic application -- a first in Canada -- were published in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews. (2020-09-29)

Untapped potential exists for blending hydropower, floating PV
Hybrid systems of floating solar panels and hydropower plants may hold the technical potential to produce a significant portion of the electricity generated annually across the globe, according to an analysis by researchers at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). (2020-09-29)

New study shows converting to electric vehicles alone won't meet climate targets
Today there are more than 7 million electric vehicles (EVs) in operation around the world, compared with only about 20,000 a decade ago. It's a massive change -- but according to a group of University of Toronto Engineering researchers, it won't be nearly enough to address the global climate crisis. (2020-09-28)

New storage battery more efficient and heat-resistant
The more important renewable energy sources become, the more urgent is the need to store the electricity produced in this way. Green energy could then also be used when the sun is not shining. To achieve this, suitable energy storage devices are indispensable. Researchers at the University of Jena (Germany) have recently developed promising new polymer electrolytes for redox flow batteries, which are flexible, efficient, and environmentally friendly. (2020-09-25)

Air pollution leads to increase in electricity usage, study suggests
High levels of air pollution are forcing people inside to consume more electricity, subsequently causing even greater environmental problems by increasing greenhouse gas emissions. (2020-09-24)

From carbon taxes to tax breaks, emission reduction policies have widespread support
As the general election nears amid a historic season of hurricanes, wildfires, and heat waves, a new survey finds that majorities of Americans are supportive of climate change mitigation measures. This suggests that policymakers can introduce legislation that would enjoy public approval--including a green stimulus package to help deal with the economic downturn associated with COVID-19. (2020-09-23)

Mirror-like photovoltaics get more electricity out of heat
New heat-harnessing 'solar' cells that reflect 99% of the energy they can't convert to electricity could help bring down the price of storing renewable energy as heat, as well as harvesting waste heat from exhaust pipes and chimneys. (2020-09-21)

CU Denver researcher analyzes the use of solar energy at US airports
By studying 488 public airports in the United States, University of Colorado Denver School of Public Affairs researcher Serena Kim, PhD, found that 20% of them have adopted solar photovoltaic (PV), commonly known as solar panels, over the last decade. (2020-09-21)

Advancing the accurate tracking of energy poverty
IIASA researchers have developed a novel measurement framework to track energy poverty that better aligns with the services people lack rather than capturing the mere absence of physical connections to a source of electricity. This alternative framework can aid better tracking of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 7 by virtue of its simplicity and sensitivity to the diversity in service conditions among the poor. (2020-09-21)

Reviewing the quantum material 'engine room', QAHE
An Australian collaboration reviews the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), one of the most fascinating and important recent discoveries in condensed-matter physics. QAHE allows zero-resistance electrical 'edge paths' in emerging quantum materials such as topological insulators, opening great potential for ultra-low energy electronics. (2020-09-16)

Theoretically, two layers are better than one for solar-cell efficiency
Solar cells have come a long way, but inexpensive, thin film solar cells are still far behind more expensive, crystalline solar cells in efficiency. Now, a team of researchers suggests that using two thin films of different materials may be the way to go to create affordable, thin film cells with about 34% efficiency. (2020-09-15)

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