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Current Electrodes News and Events, Electrodes News Articles.
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Through thick and thin: Neutrons track lithium ions in battery electrodes
Lithium-ion batteries are expected to have a global market value of $47 billion by 2023, but their use in heavy-duty applications such as electric vehicles is limited due to factors such as lengthy charge and discharge cycles. (2019-04-19)
New fiber-shaped supercapacitor for wearable electronics
A novel family of amphiphilic core-sheath structured CNT composited fiber, i.e., CNT-gold@hydrophilic CNT-polyaniline (CNT-Au@OCNT-PANI) with excellent electrochemical properties for wearable electronics was explored by Huisheng Peng et al. in Science China Materials. (2019-04-18)
New discovery makes fast-charging, better performing lithium-ion batteries possible
Creating a lithium-ion battery that can charge in a matter of minutes but still operate at a high capacity is possible, according to research from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute just published in Nature Communications. (2019-04-16)
Stability improvement under high efficiency -- next stage development of perovskite solar cells
This review summarizes the state-of-the-art progress on the improvement of device stability and discusses the directions for future research, providing an overview of the current status of the research on the stability of PSCs and guidelines for future research. (2019-04-10)
Ready, set, go: Scientists evaluate novel technique for firing up fusion-reaction fuel
Article describes analytical confirmation that transient CHI, a novel device for starting up fusion plasmas, can achieve startup in future compact fusion facilities. (2019-04-10)
Fuel cell advance a breath of fresh air for future power alternative
In an advance that could help lead the way toward longer-lived green energy devices, engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have revealed new insights about the chemical reactions that power fuel cells. (2019-04-09)
Prototype in precision
A finger print can serve as identification to access locked doors and more, but current scanners can be duped with fake or even similar fingerprints. (2019-04-05)
The brain's auto-complete function
When looking at a picture of a sunny day at the beach, we can almost smell the scent of sun screen. (2019-04-03)
Fullerenes bridge conductive gap in organic photovoltaics
Organic photovoltaics have achieved remarkably high efficiencies, but finding optimum combinations of materials for high-performance organic solar cells, which are also economically competitive, still presents a challenge. (2019-03-27)
Study shows how electricity-eating microbes use electrons to fix carbon dioxide
A Washington University team showed how a phototrophic microbe called Rhodopseudomonas palustris takes up electrons from conductive substances like metal oxides or rust to reduce carbon dioxide. (2019-03-22)
'Terminator'-like liquid metal moves and stretches in 3D space (video)
In the blockbuster 'Terminator' movie franchise, an evil robot morphs into different human forms and objects and oozes through narrow openings, thanks to its 'liquid-metal' composition. (2019-03-20)
Long-distance quantum information exchange -- success at the nanoscale
At the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, researchers have realized the swap of electron spins between distant quantum dots. (2019-03-18)
Researchers create hydrogen fuel from seawater
Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen presents an alternative to fossil fuels, but purified water is a precious resource. (2019-03-18)
X-ray analysis of carbon nanostructures helps material design
Nanostructures made of carbon are extremely versatile: they can absorb ions in batteries and supercapacitors, store gases, and desalinate water. (2019-03-13)
Parkinson's treatment delivers a power-up to brain cell 'batteries'
Scientists have gained clues into how a Parkinson's disease treatment, called deep brain stimulation, helps tackle symptoms. (2019-03-12)
Less-invasive procedure helps surgeons pinpoint epilepsy surgical candidates
A minimally invasive procedure to determine whether patients with drug-resistant epilepsy are candidates for brain surgery is safer, more efficient, and leads to better outcomes than the traditional method, according to new research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2019-03-07)
Capturing bacteria that eat and breathe electricity
WSU researchers traveled to Yellowstone National Park to find bacteria that may help solve some of the biggest challenges facing humanity -- environmental pollution and sustainable energy. (2019-03-05)
Right electrolyte doubles novel two-dimensional material's ability to store energy
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Drexel University and their partners have discovered a way to improve the energy density of promising energy-storage materials, conductive two-dimensional ceramics called MXenes. (2019-03-04)
Conducting research: Exploring charge flow through proteins
In a new study, Stuart Lindsay and his colleagues at Arizona State University explore a surprising property of proteins -- one that has only recently come to light. (2019-03-04)
Layering titanium oxide's different mineral forms for better solar cells
A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University improved the efficiency of a new type of solar cell with a double layer consisting of pure anatase and brookite, two different mineral forms of titanium oxide. (2019-02-28)
New wireless system 'cuts the cord' from newborn patient monitoring approaches
A new, less invasive system for monitoring the vital signs of some of the world's most fragile patients -- infants born pre-term or with debilitating disease -- would allow parents skin-to-skin contact with these children when they otherwise couldn't have it. (2019-02-28)
A gentle method for unlocking the mysteries of the deep brain
Serious diseases are directly linked to the subcortical areas of the brain. (2019-02-27)
Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you
It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill some people yet save others. (2019-02-21)
Expanding the use of silicon in batteries, by preventing electrodes from expanding
Silicon anodes are generally viewed as the next development in lithium-ion battery technology. (2019-02-21)
'Goldilocks' thinking to cut cost of fuel cells in electric vehicles
Electric vehicles running on fuel cells tout zero emissions and higher efficiency, but expensive platinum is holding them back from entering a larger market. (2019-02-21)
Large-scale window material developed for PM2.5 capture and light tuning
A research team from University of Science and Technology of China develops a simple and economical process to fabricate large-scale flexible smart windows. (2019-02-16)
Phase transition dynamics in two-dimensional materials
Scientists from National University of Singapore have discovered the mechanism involved when transition metal dichalcogenides on metallic substrates transform from the semiconducting 1H-phase to the quasi-metallic 1T'-phase. (2019-02-11)
How the brain responds to texture
New research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows that as neurons process information about texture from the skin, they each respond differently to various features of a surface, creating a high-dimensional representation of texture in the brain. (2019-02-08)
Electrical activity in prostate cancer cells
Experts from the universities of Bath and Seville have carried out a series of experiments with which, for the first time, they have been able to characterize the normal electrical activity in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in real time, with a resulting low-frequency electrical pattern between 0.1 and 10 Hertz. (2019-02-04)
A reconfigurable soft actuator
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a method to change the shape of a flat sheet of elastomer, using actuation that is fast, reversible, controllable by an applied voltage, and reconfigurable to different shapes. (2019-02-04)
Graphene quantum dots sensitized C-ZnO nanotaper photoanodes for solar cells application
In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from the National Institute of Technology, India, have synthesized blue-green-orange photoemissive sulfur and nitrogen co-doped graphene quantum dots (SNGQDs) using hydrothermal method. (2019-01-30)
The 'Batman' in hydrogen fuel cells
In a study published in Nature on Jan. 31, researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report advances in the development of hydrogen fuel cells that could increase its application in vehicles, especially in extreme temperatures like cold winters. (2019-01-30)
A first: Cornell researchers quantify photocurrent loss in particle interface
With a growing global population will come increased energy consumption, and sustainable forms of energy sources such as solar fuels and solar electricity will be in even greater demand. (2019-01-30)
Proton transport 'highway' may pave way to better high-power batteries
Researchers have found that a chemical mechanism first described more than two centuries ago holds the potential to revolutionize energy storage for high-power applications like vehicles or electrical grids. (2019-01-28)
Graphene can hear your brain whisper
A newly developed graphene-based implant can record electrical activity in the brain at extremely low frequencies and over large areas, unlocking the wealth of information found below 0.1 Hz. (2019-01-24)
Application of nanosized LiFePO4 modified electrode to electrochemical sensor & biosensor
The aim of this paper was to construct nanosized LFP modified electrodes, which could be applied as working electrode for rutin analysis and as an electrochemical biosensor for direct electrochemistry of Hemoglobin (Hb). (2019-01-10)
Cartilage could be key to safe 'structural batteries'
Your knees and your smartphone battery have some surprisingly similar needs, a University of Michigan professor has discovered, and that new insight has led to a 'structural battery' prototype that incorporates a cartilage-like material to make the batteries highly durable and easy to shape. (2019-01-10)
How the brain decides whether to hold 'em or fold 'em
Why do people make high-risk decisions -- in casinos or in other aspects of their lives -- even when they know the odds are stacked against them? (2019-01-07)
Research could lead to more durable cell phones and power lines
Researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a way to make cell phones and power lines more durable.  (2019-01-03)
Flexible thermoelectric generator module: A silver bullet to fix waste energy issues
Researchers developed an inexpensive large-scale flexible thermoelectric generator (FlexTEG) module with high mechanical reliability for highly efficient power generation. (2018-12-18)
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