Current Electron microscopy News and Events

Current Electron microscopy News and Events, Electron microscopy News Articles.
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Guiding the way to improved solar cell performance
Small molecules could hold the key to enhancing the efficiency of organic solar cells. (2020-11-24)

Shining a light on nanoscale dynamics
Watching metamaterials at work in real time using ultrafast electron diffraction: a research team led by University of Konstanz physicist Peter Baum succeeds in using ultrashort electron pulses to measure light-matter interactions in nanophotonic materials and metamaterials. (2020-11-24)

Understanding ion channel inhibition to open doors in drug discovery
Scientists have discovered how drug-like small molecules can regulate the activity of therapeutically relevant ion channels - and their findings could transform ongoing drug development efforts. The study reveals how a drug-like small molecule, called Pico145, binds to the TRPC5 channel, thereby preventing the channel from opening.  (2020-11-23)

Replication cycle of SARS-CoV-2 in 3D
Researchers have studied SARS-CoV-2 replication in cells and obtained detailed insights into the alterations induced in infected cells. This information is essential to guide the development of urgently needed therapeutic strategies for suppressing viral replication and induced pathology. (2020-11-23)

Perfect imperfection: Electrode defects boost resistive memory efficiency
Resistive switching memory devices offer several advantages over the currently used computer memory technology. Researchers from the MIPT Atomic Layer Deposition Lab have joined forces with colleagues from Korea to study the impact of electrode surface morphology on the properties of a resistive switching memory cell. It turned out that thicker electrodes have greater surface roughness and are associated with markedly better memory cell characteristics (2020-11-23)

Tarantula toxin attacks with molecular stinger
A bird-catching Chinese tarantula bite contains a stinger-like poison that plunges into a molecular target in the electrical signaling system of their prey's nerve cells. New cryo-electron microscopy studies show how this venom traps the voltage sensors of sodium channels in a resting state so they can't be activated. Such research may suggest designs for better drugs for chronic pain. (2020-11-23)

Altered 'coat' disguises fatal brain virus from neutralizing antibodies
A genetic modification in the 'coat' of a brain infection-causing virus may allow it to escape antibodies, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They say testing people for this and other viral mutations may help identify patients at risk for developing a fatal brain disease. (2020-11-20)

Ribosome assembly - The final trimming step
Ribosomes synthesize all the proteins in cells. Studies mainly done on yeast have revealed much about how ribosomes are put together, but an Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich team now reports that ribosome assembly in human cells requires factors that have no counterparts in simpler model organisms. (2020-11-20)

Researchers peer inside deadly pathogen's burglary kit
The bacterium that causes the tick-borne disease tularemia is a lean, mean infecting machine. It carries a relatively small genome, and a unique set of infectious tools, including a collection of chromosomal genes called 'the pathogenicity island.' Structural insights from Cryo-EM microscopy, appearing Nov. 19 in Molecular Cell, point to a way in which the bacterium's unique infectious machinery might be blocked. (2020-11-19)

Mystery solved: a 'New Kind of Electrons'
Why do certain materials emit electrons with a very specific energy? This has been a mystery for decades - scientists at TU Wien have found an answer. (2020-11-19)

Scientists age quantum dots in a test tube
Researchers from MIPT and the RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics have proposed a simple and convenient way to obtain arbitrarily sized quantum dots required for physical experiments via chemical aging. (2020-11-19)

Lovestruck by oxytocin! Novel roles of the hormone in controlling male sexual function
Hormones are the master regulators of sexual functions in mammals. The hormone oxytocin has a well-established role in social bonding, sexual function, maternal instinct, nursing, and lactation. Researchers from Okayama University have now explored the roles of oxytocin in male sexual function for the first time. Findings from the study suggest that oxytocin-mediated control of male sexual function via the spinal cord may in fact be instrumental in treating erectile dysfunction. (2020-11-18)

Gold nanoparticles turn the spotlight on drug candidates in cells
A team including researchers from Osaka University has developed a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy technique for tracking small molecules in live cells. The technique uses gold nanoparticles to boost the signal from alkyne group tags attached to the molecules. The alkyne group has a minimal effect on the drug molecule behavior and provides a signal that can be easily distinguished from the cell background. Their technique is expected to be useful in drug discovery. (2020-11-18)

Super-resolution "street view" microscopy hits the SPOT
An advanced technique called SPOT is giving researchers a opportunities to study the sophisticated world of lipid dynamics within cells. (2020-11-18)

Dual brake on transport protein prevents cells from exploding
A high concentration of salt or sugar in the environment will dehydrate microorganisms and stop them from growing. To counter this, bacteria can increase their internal solute concentration. Scientists from the University of Groningen elucidated the structure of a transport protein OpuA, that imports glycine betaine to counter osmotic stress. The protein belongs to the well-known family of ABC transporters, but it has a unique structure and working mechanism. (2020-11-18)

Revealing the unexpected structure of iron-exporter ferroportin
The 3D structure of a mammalian ferroportin reveals unexpected characteristics and a mode of action that could lead to innovative therapies. (2020-11-17)

Scientists defy nature to make insta-bling at room temperature
An international team of scientists has defied nature to make diamonds in minutes in a laboratory at room temperature - a process that normally requires billions of years, huge amounts of pressure and super-hot temperatures. (2020-11-17)

Looking inside the glass
Scientists at The University of Tokyo used electron spectroscopy to probe the coordination structures formed by the silicon atoms in aluminosilicate glass. This work may lead to innovations in the touchscreen and solar panel sectors. (2020-11-16)

Peel-off coating keeps desalination cleaner and greener
A polyelectrolyte coating enables clean seawater desalination systems without harmful chemicals. (2020-11-16)

Quantum tunneling pushes the limits of self-powered sensors
Using quantum tunneling, the lab of Shantanu Chakrabarty, at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, has developed self-powered sensors that can run for more than a year. (2020-11-16)

Ultracompact metalens microscopy breaks FOV constraints
As reported in Advanced Photonics, their metalens-integrated imaging device (MIID) exhibits an ultracompact architecture with a working imaging distance in the hundreds of micrometers. Using a simple image-stitching process, they are able to obtain wide-field microscope imaging with large FOV and high resolution. (2020-11-13)

Light shed on the atomic resolution structure of phage DNA tube
Given that phages are able to destroy bacteria, they are of particular interest to science. Basic researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin are especially interested in the tube used by phages to implant their DNA into bacteria. In collaboration with colleagues from Forschungszentrum Jülich and Jena University Hospital, they have now revealed the 3D structure of this crucial phage component in atomic resolution. (2020-11-13)

CCNY & partners in quantum algorithm breakthrough
Researchers led by City College of New York physicist Pouyan Ghaemi report the development of a quantum algorithm with the potential to study a class of many-electron quantums system using quantum computers. Their paper, entitled ''Creating and Manipulating a Laughlin-Type ν=1/3 Fractional Quantum Hall State on a Quantum Computer with Linear Depth Circuits,'' appears in the December issue of PRX Quantum, a journal of the American Physical Society. (2020-11-13)

C4 rice's first wobbly steps towards reality
An international long-term research collaboration aimed at creating high yielding and water use efficient rice varieties, has successfully installed part of the photosynthetic machinery from maize into rice. (2020-11-12)

Time for a new state of matter in high-temperature superconductors
Scientists from Universität Hamburg have pointed out how to create a time crystal in an intriguing class of materials, the high-temperature superconductors. They propose to drive these superconducting materials into a time crystalline state by inducing Higgs excitations via light. The work is reported in the journal Physical Review Research. (2020-11-12)

Advanced atomic clock makes a better dark matter detector
JILA researchers have used a state-of-the-art atomic clock to narrow the search for elusive dark matter, an example of how continual improvements in clocks have value beyond timekeeping. (2020-11-12)

Attosecond boost for electron microscopy
A team of physicists from the University of Konstanz and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München in Germany have achieved attosecond time resolution in a transmission electron microscope by combining it with a continuous-wave laser -- new insights into light-matter interactions. (2020-11-11)

Improving high-energy lithium-ion batteries with carbon filler
Lithium-ion batteries are the major rechargeable power source for many portable devices as well as electric vehicles, but their use is limited, because they do not provide high power output while simultaneously allowing reversible energy storage. Research reported in Applied Physics Reviews aims to offer a solution by showing how the inclusion of conductive fillers improves battery performance. (2020-11-10)

Peering under the "hood" of SARS-CoV-2
Microscope and protein data are incorporated into an easy-to-use-and-update tool that can model an organism's 3D appearance. (2020-11-08)

Scientists snap molecular building blocks of brain computing
A new technique for image processing helps scientists observe building blocks of brain computing--synapses. They deciphered organization of certain proteins, which endows the brain to process information. (2020-11-08)

Higher-resolution imaging of living, moving cells using plasmonic metasurfaces
Researchers at Kyushu University have demonstrated that placing cells on a plasmonic metasurface of self-assembled gold nanoparticle can improve the resolution of images of living cells taken in real-time under a widefield fluorescence microscope. The metasurface effectively confines light emission from parts of the cell near the metasurface to a nano-thickness plane, providing a simple method to improving both axial and lateral resolution. (2020-11-06)

A new candidate material for quantum spin liquids
Using a unique material, EPFL scientists have been able to design and study an unusual state of matter, the Quantum Spin Liquid. The work has significant implications for future technologies, from quantum computing to superconductivity and spintronics. (2020-11-06)

Germanium telluride's hidden properties at the nanoscale revealed
Germanium Telluride is an interesting candidate material for spintronic devices. In a comprehensive study at BESSY II, a Helmholtz-RSF Joint Research Group has now revealed how the spin texture switches by ferroelectric polarization within individual nanodomains. (2020-11-06)

Virus that causes COVID-19 puts a plug in cellular defenses
One of the novel coronavirus' most insidious tricks is that it can block the ability of cells to produce protective proteins without hindering its own ability to replicate. A new Yale study reveals how it does it. (2020-11-05)

Brown carbon 'tarballs' detected in Himalayan atmosphere
Some people refer to the Himalaya-Tibetan Plateau as the ''third pole'' because the region has the largest reserve of glacial snow and ice outside of the north and south poles. The glaciers, which are extremely sensitive to climate change and human influence, have been retreating over the past decade. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters have detected light-absorbing ''tarballs'' in the Himalayan atmosphere, which could contribute to glacial melt. (2020-11-04)

Revealing the identity of the last unknown protein of autophagy
Japanese scientists discovered that Atg9, one of the proteins that function to mediate autophagy, has phospholipid-translocation activity (the lipid scramblase activity) between the two layers of the lipid bilayer?and elucidated that the protein's activity brings about autophagosome membrane expansion. The artificial control of autophagy is expected to promote the research and development of treating and preventing various diseases. (2020-11-04)

New protein nanobioreactor designed to improve sustainable bioenergy production
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have unlocked new possibilities for the future development of sustainable, clean bioenergy. The study, published in Nature Communications, shows how bacterial protein 'cages' can be reprogrammed as nanoscale bioreactors for hydrogen production. (2020-11-03)

New mineral discovered in moon meteorite
The high-pressure mineral Donwilhelmsite, recently discovered in the lunar meteorite Oued Awlitis 001 from Apollo missions, is important for understanding the inner structure of the earth. (2020-11-03)

New analysis method can lead to better cancer drugs
While proteins on the surface of cells are the targets for most drugs, refined methods are needed to analyse how these membrane proteins are organised. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a new DNA-based analytical method that could contribute to the development of future drugs for breast and other cancers. The study is published in Nature Nanotechnology. (2020-11-02)

Room temperature conversion of CO2 to CO: A new way to synthesize hydrocarbons
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have demonstrated a room-temperature method that could significantly reduce carbon dioxide levels in fossil-fuel power plant exhaust, one of the main sources of carbon emissions in the atmosphere. (2020-11-02)

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