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Current Electronic health records News and Events, Electronic health records News Articles.
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When predictions of theoretical chemists become reality
Thomas Heine, Professor of Theoretical Chemistry at TU Dresden, together with his team, first predicted a topological 2D polymer in 2019. (2020-05-22)
Capturing the coordinated dance between electrons and nuclei in a light-excited molecule
Using SLAC's high-speed 'electron camera,' scientists simultaneously captured the movements of electrons and nuclei in a light-excited molecule. (2020-05-21)
Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment matter more for mental health than records
Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment show a stronger association with psychiatric problems compared to legal proof that maltreatment occurred, according to a new study co-written by a King's College London researcher. (2020-05-18)
Cold War nuke tests changed rainfall
Historic records from weather stations show that rainfall patterns in Scotland were affected by charge in the atmosphere released by radiation from nuclear bomb tests carried out in the 1950s and '60s. (2020-05-13)
Investigating associations of common medical conditions, alcohol use
The association between 26 common medical conditions including diabetes and high blood pressure and levels of use of alcohol was investigated with data from electronic health records of 2.7 million primary care patients. (2020-05-13)
Genes of high temperature superconductivity expressed in 3D materials
High temperature superconductors, in particular, those transition metal based ones, host quasi-two dimensional lattice structures. (2020-05-13)
A new, highly sensitive chemical sensor uses protein nanowires
Writing in NanoResearch, a team at UMass Amherst reports that they have developed bioelectronic ammonia gas sensors that are among the most sensitive ever made. (2020-05-13)
Defective graphene has high electrocatalytic activity
Russian scientists have conducted a theoretical study of the effects of defects in graphene on electron transfer at the graphene-solution interface. (2020-05-11)
Hydrogen blamed for interfering with nickelate superconductors synthesis
Prof. ZHONG Zhicheng's team at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering has investigated the electronic structure of the recently discovered nickelate superconductors NdNiO2. They successfully explained the experimental difficulties in synthesizing superconducting nickelates, in cooperation with Prof. (2020-05-08)
New invisibility concept and miniaturization of photonic circuits using ultrafast laser
Thanks to its unique three-dimensional manufacturing capacity, ultrafast laser writing is a prime candidate to meet the growing demand for the miniaturization of photonic circuitry, e.g., for scaling up optical quantum computers capacity. (2020-05-07)
Spin-dependent processes in the 2D material hexagonal boron nitride
Quantum technology was once considered to be something very expensive and available only to the largest research centers. (2020-05-06)
Exeter student leads research concluding that small red blood cells could indicate cancer
Having abnormally small red blood cells - a condition known as microcytosis - could indicate cancer, according to new research led by a University of Exeter student working with a world-leading team. (2020-05-05)
Firms perceived to fake social responsibility become targets for hackers, study shows
What corporate leaders may not realize is that strides they are making toward social responsibility may be placing a proverbial target on their backs -- if their efforts appear to be disingenuous, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. (2020-05-05)
Providing child support after prison: Some state policies may miss the mark
Many states have policies that attempt to help formerly incarcerated people find work by limiting an employer's ability to access or use criminal records as part of the hiring process. (2020-05-04)
Making transitions from nursing home to hospital safer during COVID-19 outbreak
Based on their research and clinical experiences, Kathleen Unroe, M.D., and colleagues have developed the top 10 points for safe care transitions between nursing home and emergency departments during the pandemic. (2020-04-28)
Could suicide risk be predicted from a patient's records?
A study led by Boston Children's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital demonstrates that a predictive computer model can identify patients at risk for attempting suicide from patterns in their electronic health records -- an average of two years ahead of time. (2020-04-24)
Sensors woven into a shirt can monitor vital signs
MIT researchers developed a way to incorporate electronic sensors into stretchy fabrics, allowing them to create shirts or other garments that could monitor vital signs such as temperature, respiration, and heart rate. (2020-04-23)
Moiré engineering applicable in correlated oxides by USTC researchers
It provides a potential and brand-new route to achieving spatially patterned electronic textures on demand in strained epitaxial materials. (2020-04-16)
Prescribing an overdose: A chapter in the opioid epidemic
Research indicates that widespread opioid overprescribing contributed to the opioid epidemic. (2020-04-15)
Lung-heart super sensor on a chip tinier than a ladybug
This Lilliputian chip's detection bandwidth is enormous -- from sweeping body motions to faint sounds of the heartbeat, pulse waves traversing body tissues, respiration rate, and lung sounds. (2020-04-15)
Novel metrics suggests electronic consultations are appropriate, useful alternative to face-to-face medical appointments
Using novel metrics, researchers found that 70% of electronic consultations, or e-consults, were appropriate based on their proposed criteria and 81% were associated with avoided face-to-face visits. (2020-04-13)
Depression in adults who are overweight or obese
In an analysis of primary care records of 519,513 UK adults who were overweight or obese between 2000-2016 and followed up until 2019, the incidence of new cases of depression was 92 per 10,000 people per year. (2020-04-08)
The human body as an electrical conductor, a new method of wireless power transfer
The project Electronic AXONs: wireless microstimulators based on electronic rectification of epidermically applied currents (eAXON, 2017-2022), funded by a European Research Council (ERC) Consolidator Grant awarded to Antoni Ivorra, head of the Biomedical Electronics Research Group (BERG) of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies (DTIC) at UPF principally aims to 'develop very thin, flexible, injectable microstimulators to restore movement in paralysis', says Ivorra, principal investigator of the project. (2020-04-06)
A twist connecting magnetism and electronic-band topology
Materials that combine topological electronic properties and quantum magnetism are of high current interest, for the quantum many-body physics that can unfold in them and for possible applications in electronic components. (2020-04-03)
New study identifies characteristics of patients with fatal COVID-19
In a new study, researchers identified the most common characteristics of 85 COVID-19 patients who died in Wuhan, China in the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic. (2020-04-03)
Turning cells into computers with protein logic gates
New artificial proteins have been created to function as molecular logic gates. (2020-04-02)
AI finds 2D materials in the blink of an eye
A research team at The University of Tokyo has introduced a machine-learning algorithm that can scan through microscope images to find 2D materials like graphene. (2020-04-01)
Technology use by adults with type 1 diabetes lower among African-Americans, Hispanics
Continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) devices are known to improve outcomes in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), yet African-American and Hispanic patients face barriers to the use of these devices, according to results of a small single-center retrospective study. (2020-03-31)
Cancer treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors may lead to thyroid dysfunction
Thyroid dysfunction following cancer treatment with new treatments called immune checkpoint inhibitors is more common than previously thought, according to research that was accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, and will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-03-31)
How to break new records in the 200 metres?
Usain Bolt's 200m record has not been beaten for ten years and Florence Griffith Joyner's for more than thirty years. (2020-03-25)
Researchers unveil framework for sharing clinical data in AI era
Clinical data should be treated as a public good when it is used for secondary purposes, such as research or the development of AI algorithms, according to a new special report. (2020-03-24)
Recipe for neuromorphic processing systems?
The field of 'brain-mimicking' neuromorphic electronics shows great potential for basic research and commercial applications, and researchers in Germany and Switzerland recently explored the possibility of reproducing the physics of real neural circuits by using the physics of silicon. (2020-03-24)
Social, financial factors critical to assessing cardiovascular risk
Certain markers of a person's financial and social status, known as social determinants of health, offer valuable information about a person's potential risk of heart disease but are often overlooked, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC). (2020-03-18)
Giant clam shells: Unprecedented natural archives for paleoweather
A research team led by Prof. YAN Hong, from the Institute of Earth Environment found that Tridacna shells have the potential to be used as an unprecedented archive for Paleoweather reconstructions. (2020-03-16)
Facebook users change their language before an emergency hospital visit
The language in Facebook posts becomes less formal and invokes family more often in the lead-up to an emergency room visit. (2020-03-12)
A new record of deglaciations in last million years shows persistent role of obliquity pacing
Over the last million years, small variations in Earth's orbit continued to trigger and terminate global glaciations, throughout and after the Mid-Pleistocene Transition, according to a new study, which presents a novel high-resolution record of the last 11 deglaciations. (2020-03-12)
Facebook language changes before an emergency hospital visit
A new study published in Nature Scientific Reports reveals that the language people use on Facebook subtly changes before they make a visit to the emergency department (ED). (2020-03-12)
Deciphering disorder
Researchers have combined experimental and theoretical techniques to measure atomic positions of all the atoms in a 2D material and calculate how the arrangement impacts the electronic properties of various regions of the system. (2020-03-11)
Artificial intelligence and family medicine: Better together
Researcher at the University of Houston are encouraging family medicine physicians to actively engage in the development and evolution of artificial intelligence to open new horizons that make AI more effective, equitable and pervasive. (2020-03-11)
BU researchers: The health care system is failing transgender cancer survivors
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study is the first-ever population-based study of cancer prevalence in transgender people, estimating 62,530 of the nearly 17 million cancer survivors in the US are transgender. (2020-03-09)
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