Current Electrons News and Events

Current Electrons News and Events, Electrons News Articles.
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Pitt researchers create nanoscale slalom course for electrons
''We already know how to shoot electrons ballistically through one-dimensional nanowires made from these oxide materials,'' explains Levy. ''What is different here is that we have changed the environment for the electrons, forcing them to weave left and right as they travel. This motion changes the properties of the electrons, giving rise to new behavior.'' (2020-11-25)

Shining a light on nanoscale dynamics
Watching metamaterials at work in real time using ultrafast electron diffraction: a research team led by University of Konstanz physicist Peter Baum succeeds in using ultrashort electron pulses to measure light-matter interactions in nanophotonic materials and metamaterials. (2020-11-24)

UCF researcher zeroes in on critical point for improving superconductors
Developing a practical ''room temperature'' superconductor is a feat science has yet to achieve. However a UCF researcher and his colleagues are working to move this goal closer to realization by taking a closer look at what is happening in ''strange'' metals. The research was published recently in the journal Communications Physics - Nature. (2020-11-23)

Direct visualization of quantum dots reveals shape of quantum wave function
Trapping and controlling electrons in bilayer graphene quantum dots yields a promising platform for quantum information technologies. Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have now achieved the first direct visualization of quantum dots in bilayer graphene, revealing the shape of the quantum wave function of the trapped electrons. (2020-11-23)

Staying ahead of the curve with 3D curved graphene
A team of researchers has amplified 3D graphene's electrical properties by controlling its curvature. (2020-11-20)

One-way street for electrons
An international team of physicists, led by researchers of the Universities of Oldenburg and Bremen, Germany, has recorded an ultrafast film of the directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial. Theoretical simulations confirmed the experimental finding. The results have been published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. (2020-11-20)

New insights into memristive devices by combining incipient ferroelectrics and graphene
Scientists are working to create neuromorphic computers, with a design based on the human brain. A crucial component is a memristive device, the resistance of which depends on the history of the device - just like the response of our neurons depends on previous input. Materials scientists from the University of Groningen analysed the behaviour of strontium titanium oxide, a platform material for memristor research and used the 2D material graphene to probe it. (2020-11-20)

Mystery solved: a 'New Kind of Electrons'
Why do certain materials emit electrons with a very specific energy? This has been a mystery for decades - scientists at TU Wien have found an answer. (2020-11-19)

New semiconductor coating may pave way for future green fuels
Hydrogen gas and methanol for fuel cells or as raw materials for the chemicals industry, for example, could be produced more sustainably using sunlight, a new Uppsala University study shows. In this study, researchers have developed a new coating material for semiconductors that may create new opportunities to produce fuels in processes that combine direct sunlight with electricity. The study is published in Nature Communications. (2020-11-18)

Boosted signal
First introduced into wide use in the middle of the 20th century, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has since become an indispensable technique for examining materials down to their atoms, revealing molecular structure and other details without interfering with the material itself. (2020-11-16)

Quantum tunneling pushes the limits of self-powered sensors
Using quantum tunneling, the lab of Shantanu Chakrabarty, at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, has developed self-powered sensors that can run for more than a year. (2020-11-16)

Manchester group discover new family of quasiparticles in graphene-based materials
After years of dedicated research a group of pioneering scientists led by Nobel Laureate Andre Geim have again revealed a phenomenon that is 'radically different from textbook physics' and this work has led to the discovery and characterisation of a new family of quasiparticles found in graphene-based materials. Called Brown-Zak fermions these extraordinary particles have the potential to achieve the Holy Grail of 2D materials by having ultra-high frequency transistors which can in turn produce a new generation of superfast electronic devices. (2020-11-13)

History of temperature changes in the Universe revealed
How hot is the Universe today? How hot was it before? A new study by an international team of researchers, including members of the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU), suggests that the mean temperature of gas in large structures of the Universe has increased about 3 times in the last 8 billion years, to reach about two million Kelvin today. (2020-11-13)

Handles and holes in abstract spaces: how a material conducts electricity better
A new theory has succeeded in establishing a new relationship between the presence or absence of 'handles' in the space of the arrangements of atoms and molecules that make up a material, and the propensity of the latter to conduct electricity. The insulating materials 'equipped with handles' can conduct electricity as well as metals, while retaining typical properties of insulators, such as transparency. (2020-11-13)

Charges cascading along a molecular chain
A team of researchers led by Berkeley Lab has developed a method to fabricate a one-dimensional array of individual molecules and to precisely control its electronic structure. (2020-11-12)

The transformation of a pair: How electrons supertransport current in 'bad metals'
The repulsive forces between the electrons in bad metals are much stronger than in low-temperature superconductors: so how do particles with the same charge overcome these forces and manage to pair-up and to transport current as it happens in ''traditional'' superconductors? According to a new study, in these materials the electrons would transform into new ''objects'', with an unprecedented character that would allow them to superconduct the current. (2020-11-11)

Attosecond boost for electron microscopy
A team of physicists from the University of Konstanz and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München in Germany have achieved attosecond time resolution in a transmission electron microscope by combining it with a continuous-wave laser -- new insights into light-matter interactions. (2020-11-11)

Researchers trap electrons to create elusive crystal
Now, a Cornell-led collaboration has developed a way to stack two-dimensional semiconductors and trap electrons in a repeating pattern that forms a specific and long-hypothesized crystal. (2020-11-11)

Sticky electrons: When repulsion turns into attraction
Scientists in Vienna explain what happens at a strange 'border line' in materials science: Under certain conditions, materials change from well-known behaviour to different, partly unexplained phenomena. This can be explained by the emergence of attractive forces, counteracting the repulsion between electrons. (2020-11-10)

3D print experts discover how to make tomorrow's technology using ink-jet printed graphene
The University of Nottingham has cracked the conundrum of how to use inks to 3D-print novel electronic devices with useful properties, such as an ability to convert light into electricity. (2020-11-04)

Researchers develop a high-power, portable terahertz laser
Researchers at MIT and the University of Waterloo have developed a high-power, portable version of a device called a quantum cascade laser, which can generate terahertz radiation outside of a laboratory setting. The laser could potentially be used in applications such as pinpointing skin cancer and detecting hidden explosives. (2020-11-02)

Identifying biomolecule fragments in ionising radiation
In a new study published in EPJ D, researchers define for the first time the precise exact ranges in which positively and negatively charged fragments can be produced when living cells are bombarded with fast, heavy ions. (2020-10-29)

Direct observation of a single electron's butterfly-shaped distribution in titanium oxide
A research team led by Nagoya University has observed the smeared-out spatial distribution of a single valence electron at the centre of a titanium oxide molecule, using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and a new Fourier synthesis method also developed by the team. The method can determine the orbital states in materials regardless of their physical properties and without the need for difficult experiments or analytical techniques. The work was published recently in Physical Review Research. (2020-10-28)

Scientists explain the paradox of quantum forces in nanodevices
Researchers proposed a new approach to describe the interaction of metals with electromagnetic fluctuations (i.e., with random bursts of electric and magnetic fields). Researchers proposed a new approach to describe the interaction of metals with electromagnetic fluctuations (i.e., with random bursts of electric and magnetic fields). (2020-10-27)

A question of affinity
A collaboration of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Germany and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia have recently scrutinized organic solar cells and derived design rules for light-absorbing dyes that can help to make these cells more efficient, while tailoring the absorption spectrum of the cells to the needs of the chosen application. (2020-10-27)

A blast of gas for better solar cells
Treating silicon with carbon dioxide gas in plasma processing brings simplicity and control to a key step for making solar cells. (2020-10-26)

Light on efficiency loss in organic solar cells
A deeper understanding of efficiency-limiting processes provides design rules for organic solar cell materials. (2020-10-26)

Collaboration sparks new model for ceramic conductivity
As insulators, metal oxides - also known as ceramics - may not seem like obvious candidates for electrical conductivity. While electrons zip back and forth in regular metals, their movement in ceramic materials is sluggish and difficult to detect. (2020-10-22)

Kitchen temperature supercurrents from stacked 2D materials
A 'stack' of 2D materials could allow for supercurrents at ground-breakingly warm temperatures, easily achievable in the household kitchen. An international study published in August opens a new route to high-temperature supercurrents -- at temperatures, as 'warm' as inside your kitchen fridge. (Previously, superconductivity has been difficult even at temperatures as low as -170°C, making superconductivity impractical for many of its most exciting applications.) (2020-10-20)

Sludge-powered bacteria generate more electricity, faster
A new electroactive bacterium could help fuel wastewater treatment reactors. (2020-10-19)

Molecular design strategy reveals near infrared-absorbing hydrocarbon
The lessons learned from a near infrared absorbing, bowl-shaped molecule made only from hydrogen and carbon atoms offers insights for future organic conductors. (2020-10-17)

Zeptoseconds: new world record in short time measurement
In the global race to measure ever shorter time spans, physicists from Goethe University Frankfurt have now taken the lead: together with colleagues at the accelerator facility DESY in Hamburg and the Fritz-Haber-Institute in Berlin, they have measured a process that lies within the realm of zeptoseconds for the first time: the propagation of light within a molecule. A zeptosecond is a trillionth of a billionth of a second (10 exp -21 seconds). (2020-10-16)

uOttawa researchers find cheaper, faster way to measure the electric field of light
Researchers at the University of Ottawa have created a new method to measure the temporal evolution of electric fields with optical frequencies. The new approach, which works in ambient air, facilitates the direct measurement of the field waveform and could lead to breakthroughs in high-speed electronics. (2020-10-16)

When Fock meets Landau: Topology in atom-photon interactions
Topological photonics concerns the classical wave simulation of electronic band topology. Does the quantum nature of light embed new topological states? By exploiting the similarity between the Jaynes-Cummings model and graphene, topological states of quantized light were found with a wealth of physics involving the valley Hall effect, the Haldane model and the Lifshitz topological transition. This research built a bridge between quantum electrodynamics and topological phases in condensed matter physics. (2020-10-14)

Scientists develop detector for investigating the sun
Researchers from MIPT have developed a prototype detector of solar particles. The device is capable of picking up protons at kinetic energies between 10 and 100 megaelectronvolts, and electrons at 1-10 MeV. This covers most of the high-energy particle flux coming from the sun. The new detector can improve radiation protection for astronauts and spaceships, as well as advancing our understanding of solar flares. (2020-10-13)

Stacking and twisting graphene unlocks a rare form of magnetism
A team of researchers at Columbia University and the University of Washington has discovered that a variety of exotic electronic states, including a rare form of magnetism, can arise in a three-layer graphene structure. (2020-10-12)

RUDN University scientist suggested a simple model of dense plasma spectral properties
A scientist from RUDN University suggested a new physical model to describe the optical properties of dense plasma. The model was tested on available experimental data and does not require complex calculations. (2020-10-08)

One electrode fits all functional groups
IBS and KAIST researchers employed the gold electrode and attached the target molecules onto the electrode. Just like functional groups generate diverse electronic effects, one electrode fits all reactions as the single electrode can behave like multiple functional groups just with the switch of applied voltage. (2020-10-08)

Diamonds are a quantum scientist's best friend
New research details the phenomenon of what is called ''triplet superconductivity'' in diamond. Triplet superconductivity occurs when electrons move in a composite spin state rather than as a single pair. This is an extremely rare, yet efficient form of superconductivity that until now has only been known to occur in one or two other materials, and only theoretically in diamonds. (2020-10-07)

Could megatesla magnetic fields be realized on Earth?
A team of researchers led by Osaka University discovered a novel mechanism called a ''microtube implosion,'' demonstrating the generation of megatesla-order magnetic fields, which is three orders of magnitude higher than those ever experimentally achieved. The underlying physics was revealed by particle simulations using a supercomputer. Their promising findings will open new frontiers in many branches of fundamental physics and applications involving ultrahigh magnetic fields. (2020-10-06)

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