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Current Elephants News and Events

Current Elephants News and Events, Elephants News Articles.
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New findings highlight threatened status of forest elephants
Conservation efforts for the African forest elephant have been hindered by how little is known the large animal, according to researchers. (2020-04-29)
Disappearance of animal species takes mental, cultural and material toll on humans
The research reveals that hunter-gatherer societies expressed a deep emotional and psychological connection with the animal species they hunted, especially after their disappearance. (2020-04-27)
Elephant welfare can be assessed using two indicators
In two new studies, scientists from the University of Turku, Finland, have investigated how to measure stress in semi-captive working elephants. (2020-04-01)
Six million-year-old bird skeleton points to arid past of Tibetan plateau
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have found a new species of sandgrouse in six to nine million-year-old rocks in Gansu Province in western China. (2020-04-01)
Scientists investigate why females live longer than males
An international team of scientists found that, like humans, female wild animals tend to live longer than males. (2020-03-24)
Christmas Island discovery redraws map of life
The world's animal distribution map will need to be redrawn and textbooks updated, after researchers discovered the existence of 'Australian' species on Christmas Island. (2020-03-22)
Climate shifts prompt shrubs and trees to take root in open areas
Wild, treeless landscapes are becoming more wooded as climate change leads to warming temperatures and wetter weather, research suggests. (2020-03-10)
Amazon rainforest could be gone within a lifetime
Writing in Nature Communications, researchers from Bangor University, Southampton University and The School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London, reveal the speed at which ecosystems of different sizes will disappear, once they have reached a point beyond which they collapse -- transforming into an alternative ecosystem. (2020-03-10)
Unexpected ways animals influence fires
Animals eating plants might seem like an obvious way to suppress fire, and humans are already using the enormous appetites of goats, deer, and cows to reduce the fuel available for potential wildfires. (2020-03-05)
Balancing bushmeat trade and conservation vital to ensure livelihoods not threatened
Local communities in the Congo rainforest have been working with researchers from the University of York in a bid to balance the bushmeat trade with conservation. (2020-03-05)
Why is the female wallaby always pregnant?
Researchers show that female swamp wallabies ovulate, mate, and form a new embryo prepartum, while continuously supporting conceptuses and young at different development stages before and after birth. (2020-03-03)
Threatened birds and mammals have irreplaceable roles in the natural world
A new study led from the University of Southampton has shown that threatened birds and mammals are often ecologically distinct and irreplaceable in their environment. (2020-02-24)
Taming age survival of Asian elephants three times higher than in the 1970s
Researchers from the University of Turku (UTU) in Finland, and veterinarians from the Myanma Timber Enterprise (MTE) in Myanmar have investigated the trends behind Asian elephant calf mortality during the taming period. (2020-02-12)
Scientists resurrect mammoth's broken genes
Mammoths on Wrangel Island may have been the last of their kind anywhere on Earth. (2020-02-07)
Study resurrects mammoth DNA to explore the cause of their extinction
A new study in Genome Biology and Evolution, published by Oxford University Press, resurrected the mutated genes of the last herd of woolly mammoths and found that their small population had developed a number of genetic defects that may have proved fatal for the species. (2020-02-07)
Researchers study elephants' unique interactions with their dead
Stories of unique and sentient interactions between elephants and their dead are a familiar part of the species' lore, but a comprehensive study of these interactions has been lacking -- until now. (2020-02-06)
A chronicle of giant straight-tusked elephants
About 800,000 years ago, the giant straight-tusked elephant Palaeoloxodon migrated out of Africa and became widespread across Europe and Asia. (2020-01-21)
Broadest study to date of Bornean elephants yields insight into their habitat selection
In collaboration with scientists from Danau Girang Field Centre, Harvard University, and the South East Asia Rainforest Research Partnership, scientists from the Arizona State University Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science (GDCS) led the broadest study to date that assesses how elephants utilize different landscapes in Sabah. (2020-01-10)
'Like a video game with health points,' energy budgets explain evolutionary body size
Budgeting resources isn't just a problem for humans preparing a holiday dinner, or squirrels storing up nuts for the winter. (2019-12-18)
Study of elephant, capybara, human hair finds that thicker hair isn't always stronger
Despite being four times thicker than human hair, elephant hair is only half as strong -- that's just one finding from researchers studying the hair strength of many different mammals. (2019-12-11)
Deciphering the equations of life
Research led by the University of Arizona has resulted in a set of equations that describes and predicts commonalities across life despite its enormous diversity. (2019-12-11)
In hunted rainforests, termites lose their dominance
Termite populations in African rainforests decline sharply when elephants and other large animals disappear. (2019-12-02)
Leftover grain from breweries could be converted into fuel for homes
A Queen's University Belfast researcher has developed a low cost technique to convert left over barley from alcohol breweries into carbon, which could be used as a renewable fuel for homes in winter, charcoal for summer barbecues or water filters in developing countries. (2019-11-26)
New assessment finds EU electricity decarbonization discourse in need of overhaul
It's well known that the EU is focusing its efforts on decarbonizing its economy. (2019-11-18)
Complex society discovered in birds
The first existence of a multilevel society in a non-mammalian animal shows that large brains are not a requirement for complex societies (2019-11-04)
Online tool speeds response to elephant poaching by tracing ivory to source
A new tool uses an interactive database of geographic and genetic information to quickly identify where the confiscated tusks of African elephants were originally poached. (2019-11-01)
Zoo animal research skewed towards 'popular' species
Research on zoo animals focuses more on 'familiar' species like gorillas and chimpanzees than less well known ones like the waxy monkey frog, scientists say. (2019-10-31)
Lend me a flipper
Researchers at Kyoto University's Primate Research Institute, Kindai University, and Kagoshima City Aquarium investigated the cooperative abilities of dolphins. (2019-10-28)
Capturing elephants from the wild hinders their reproduction for over a decade
Capturing elephants to keep in captivity not only hinders their reproduction immediately, but also has a negative effect on their calves, according to new research. (2019-10-09)
Early humans evolved in ecosystems unlike any found today
To understand the environmental pressures that shaped human evolution, scientists must reconstruct the ecosystems in which they lived. (2019-10-07)
Big data reveals extraordinary unity underlying life's diversity
Limits to growth lie at the heart of how all living things function, according to a new study carried out by ICTA-UAB researchers. (2019-10-07)
Genomic fluke close-up
A group led by Makedonka Mitreva at Washington University in St. (2019-10-01)
Planned roads would be 'dagger in the heart' for Borneo's forests and wildlife
Malaysia's plans to create a Pan-Borneo Highway will severely degrade one of the world's most environmentally imperilled regions, says a research team from Australia and Malaysia. (2019-09-18)
Early humans used tiny, flint 'surgical' tools to butcher elephants
A new Tel Aviv University-led study reveals that the early humans known as Acheulians crafted tiny flint tools out of recycled larger discarded instruments as part of a comprehensive animal-butchery tool kit. (2019-09-11)
How much carbon the land can stomach with more carbon dioxide in the air
Researchers from 28 institutions in nine countries succeeded in quantifying carbon dioxide fertilization for the past five decades, using simulations from 12 terrestrial ecosystem models and observations from seven field carbon dioxide enrichment experiments. (2019-09-02)
African elephants demonstrate movements that vary in response to ecological change
Wild African elephants show markedly different movements and reactions to the same risks and resources, according to a new study from Colorado State University and Save the Elephants. (2019-08-20)
African forest elephant helps increase biomass and carbon storage
Un international study with key contributions from Brazilian researchers shows that an endangered species, famed as a 'forest gardener,' influences African forest composition in terms of tree species and increases the aboveground biomass over the long term. (2019-08-12)
Clemson adds 'vampire elephants,' 'ecological zombies' to human-wildlife conflict debate
New research by Clemson University scientists Shari Rodriguez and Christie Sampson in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, examines the effects non-carnivorous species such as feral hogs and elephants can have on humans and livestock and the potential consequences of excluding these animals from research focused on mitigating wildlife impacts on livestock. (2019-08-12)
A hog in wolf's clothing
Most research on human-wildlife conflict has focused on the ways tigers, wolves, and other predators impact livestock even though noncarnivores also threaten livestock. (2019-08-06)
Mastering metabolism for shark and ray survival
Understanding the internal energy flow -- including the metabolism -- of large ocean creatures like sharks and rays could be key to their survival in a changing climate, according to a new study. (2019-07-31)
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