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Current Empathy News and Events

Current Empathy News and Events, Empathy News Articles.
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Empathy may be in the eye of the beholder
Do we always want people to show empathy? Not so, said researchers from the University of California, Davis. (2020-10-27)
Nonverbal doctor-patient rapport relieved pain during acupuncture treatment
When 22 acupuncture clinicians and 23 patients seeking pain relief mirrored each other's facial expressions during acupuncture treatment, patients experienced less pain, according to a new study. (2020-10-21)
Dual brain imaging provides insight into neural basis of patient-clinician relationship
Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital have reported on an experiment using a novel magnetic resonance imaging-based approach to track the effects of different behaviors on the brain while patients and clinicians interact with one another. (2020-10-21)
Empathy exacerbates discussions about immigration
Discussions about immigration are heated, even antagonistic. But what happens when supporters and opponents undertake to show more empathy? (2020-10-14)
Empathy prevents COVID-19 spreading
The more empathetic we are, the more likely it is that we will keep our distance and use face masks to prevent coronavirus spreading. (2020-10-13)
Men less likely to see food as national security issue amid pandemic
On average, men not only showed less empathy toward temporary agricultural laborers but also were less likely to see food supply and production as national security issues, according to a study led by a Washington State University researcher. (2020-10-08)
From San Diego to Italy, study suggests wisdom can protect against loneliness
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and University of Rome La Sapienza examined middle-aged and older adults in San Diego and Cilento, Italy and found loneliness and wisdom had a strong negative correlation. (2020-10-01)
The unintended consequence of becoming empathetic
Many people want to become more empathetic. But, these changes in personality may also lead to changes in political ideologies. (2020-09-16)
Binge-drinkers' brains have to work harder to feel empathy for others
New research shows that binge-drinkers' brains have to put more effort into trying to feel empathy for other people in pain. (2020-09-10)
Why obeying orders can make us do terrible things
War atrocities are sometimes committed by 'normal' people obeying orders. (2020-08-21)
Dementia education
School-based dementia education could deliver much needed empathy and understanding for older generations as new research from the University of South Australia shows it can significantly improve dementia knowledge and awareness among younger generations. (2020-08-20)
Dignity and respect go a long way in county jail, new research shows
A University of Wisconsin Oshkosh study indicates a little respect and decency can go a long way in improving some aspects of America's criminal justice system. (2020-08-12)
Patient experiences in medical imaging and radiation therapy: The importance of skilled patient care professionals
I went into the MRI bracing for the wave of panic I knew would come as soon as I was strapped down and inside the machine.'' In ''A Tale of Two MRIs'' by patient Lelainia Lloyd, her experiences--good and bad--are shared as part of an upcoming special issue of the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, published by Elsevier. (2020-08-10)
Make the best of bad reviews by leveraging consumer empathy
When confronted with unfair negative reviews, firms can strategically leverage consumer empathy and benefit from potential downstream consequences. (2020-08-06)
How creating an "empathy lens" makes P2P marketing communications more effective
Provider-focused P2P marketing communications increase consumers' likelihood of purchase, app download, and willingness to pay. (2020-08-01)
Electronic surveillance in couple relationships
Impaired intimacy, satisfaction, and infidelity in a romantic relationship can fuel Interpersonal Electronic Surveillance (IES). (2020-07-13)
Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
According to the latest UN report, the number of displaced persons and refugees has surged, again, by several millions. (2020-07-09)
UChicago study shows 'Bystander Effect' not exclusive to humans
A rat is less likely to help a trapped companion if it is with other rats that aren't helping, according to new research from the University of Chicago that showed the social psychological theory of the ''bystander effect'' in humans is present in these long-tailed rodents. (2020-07-08)
Traits associated with increased risk of gun use among high-risk adolescents
Research out today identifies traits among high-risk adolescents associated with increased risk for gun use. (2020-06-16)
Birth control pills affect the love hormone
A recent research study from Aarhus University has shown that women who take birth control pills have a much higher level of the hormone oxytocin, also called the love hormone, in their blood compared to non-users. (2020-05-20)
Is video game addiction real?
A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. (2020-05-13)
OU professor examines the fifty shades phenomenon
In a new study, Meredith G. F. Worthen, professor of sociology at the University of Oklahoma, and Trenton M. (2020-05-12)
How handling meat leads to psychological numbness
Butchers and deli workers become desensitised to handling meat within the first two years of handling it as part of their job say psychologists. (2020-05-11)
Despite millennial stereotypes, burnout just as bad for Gen X doctors in training
Despite the seemingly pervasive opinion that millennial physicians are more prone to burnout and a lack of empathy compared to older generations, a new study of 588 millennial and Generation X residents and fellows by researchers at Northwestern Medicine and Cleveland Clinic found that no such generational gap exists. (2020-05-05)
Learning empathy as a care giver takes more than experience
Research among nursing students shows that past experience living in poverty or volunteering in impoverished communities, does not sufficiently build empathy towards patients who experience poverty. (2020-03-09)
Scientists shed new light on neural processes behind our desire for revenge
New insight on the neural processes that drive a desire for revenge during conflict between groups has been published today in the open-access journal eLife. (2020-03-03)
Study finds empathy can be detected in people whose brains are at rest
UCLA researchers have found that it is possible to assess a person's ability to feel empathy by studying their brain activity while they are resting rather than while they are engaged in specific tasks. (2020-02-18)
Medical students become less empathic toward patients throughout medical school
The nationwide, multi-institutional cross-sectional study of students at DO-granting medical schools found that those students -- like their peers in MD-granting medical schools -- lose empathy as they progress through medical school. (2020-02-05)
Siblings of children with intellectual disabilities score high on empathy and closeness
A new Tel Aviv University and University of Haifa study finds that relationships between children and their siblings with intellectual disabilities are more positive than those between typically developing siblings. (2020-01-14)
Paving the way to healing complex trauma
A major study led by researchers at La Trobe University in Australia has identified key themes that will be used to inform strategies to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander parents in the first years of their children's lives. (2019-12-13)
Women wearing hijabs in news stories may be judged negatively
Women wearing a veil or headscarf in the United States may face harsher social judgement, according to a study by Penn State researchers that found when given the same information in a news story, some people may consider a woman wearing a headscarf to be more likely to have committed a crime. (2019-12-03)
One third of UK doctors may suffer from workplace 'burnout'
One in three UK doctors working in obstetrics and gynecology may suffer from workplace burnout, which could affect their wellbeing and how they treat patients. (2019-11-25)
Would people be willing to give their personal data for research?
New research led by the University of Bristol has found that over half of people would be willing to donate their personal data for research to benefit the wider general public. (2019-11-20)
Narcissism can lower stress levels and reduce chances of depression
People who have grandiose narcissistic traits are more likely to be 'mentally tough,' feel less stressed and are less vulnerable to depression, research led by Queen's University Belfast has found. (2019-10-29)
Mindfulness meditation enhances positive effects of psilocybin
Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the clinical application of classic psychedelics in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. (2019-10-24)
Brain imaging reveals neural correlates of human social behavior
Advances in the study of human social behavior may lead to a better understanding of normal processes such as empathy and theory of mind, as well as dysregulated conditions including autism spectrum disorder. (2019-10-22)
Mothers' behavior influences bonding hormone oxytocin in babies
A new epigenetic study now suggests that mothers' behavior can also have a substantial impact on their children's developing oxytocin systems. (2019-10-16)
Why rats prefer company of the young and stressed
Researchers have identified a neural pathway implicated in social interaction between adult and juvenile animals, according to new research in rats published in JNeurosci. (2019-10-10)
Poorly reported placebos could lead to mistaken estimates of benefits and harms
Researchers at the University of Oxford have found that placebo controls are almost never described according to standard reporting guidelines. (2019-09-29)
Standardized medical residency exam may reduce pool of diverse and qualified candidates
Test scores bias entry to radiation-oncology residency programs, and potentially other programs. (2019-09-11)
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