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Current Empathy News and Events

Current Empathy News and Events, Empathy News Articles.
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How creating an "empathy lens" makes P2P marketing communications more effective
Provider-focused P2P marketing communications increase consumers' likelihood of purchase, app download, and willingness to pay. (2020-08-01)
Electronic surveillance in couple relationships
Impaired intimacy, satisfaction, and infidelity in a romantic relationship can fuel Interpersonal Electronic Surveillance (IES). (2020-07-13)
Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
According to the latest UN report, the number of displaced persons and refugees has surged, again, by several millions. (2020-07-09)
UChicago study shows 'Bystander Effect' not exclusive to humans
A rat is less likely to help a trapped companion if it is with other rats that aren't helping, according to new research from the University of Chicago that showed the social psychological theory of the ''bystander effect'' in humans is present in these long-tailed rodents. (2020-07-08)
Traits associated with increased risk of gun use among high-risk adolescents
Research out today identifies traits among high-risk adolescents associated with increased risk for gun use. (2020-06-16)
Birth control pills affect the love hormone
A recent research study from Aarhus University has shown that women who take birth control pills have a much higher level of the hormone oxytocin, also called the love hormone, in their blood compared to non-users. (2020-05-20)
Is video game addiction real?
A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. (2020-05-13)
OU professor examines the fifty shades phenomenon
In a new study, Meredith G. F. Worthen, professor of sociology at the University of Oklahoma, and Trenton M. (2020-05-12)
How handling meat leads to psychological numbness
Butchers and deli workers become desensitised to handling meat within the first two years of handling it as part of their job say psychologists. (2020-05-11)
Despite millennial stereotypes, burnout just as bad for Gen X doctors in training
Despite the seemingly pervasive opinion that millennial physicians are more prone to burnout and a lack of empathy compared to older generations, a new study of 588 millennial and Generation X residents and fellows by researchers at Northwestern Medicine and Cleveland Clinic found that no such generational gap exists. (2020-05-05)
Learning empathy as a care giver takes more than experience
Research among nursing students shows that past experience living in poverty or volunteering in impoverished communities, does not sufficiently build empathy towards patients who experience poverty. (2020-03-09)
Scientists shed new light on neural processes behind our desire for revenge
New insight on the neural processes that drive a desire for revenge during conflict between groups has been published today in the open-access journal eLife. (2020-03-03)
Study finds empathy can be detected in people whose brains are at rest
UCLA researchers have found that it is possible to assess a person's ability to feel empathy by studying their brain activity while they are resting rather than while they are engaged in specific tasks. (2020-02-18)
Medical students become less empathic toward patients throughout medical school
The nationwide, multi-institutional cross-sectional study of students at DO-granting medical schools found that those students -- like their peers in MD-granting medical schools -- lose empathy as they progress through medical school. (2020-02-05)
Siblings of children with intellectual disabilities score high on empathy and closeness
A new Tel Aviv University and University of Haifa study finds that relationships between children and their siblings with intellectual disabilities are more positive than those between typically developing siblings. (2020-01-14)
Paving the way to healing complex trauma
A major study led by researchers at La Trobe University in Australia has identified key themes that will be used to inform strategies to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander parents in the first years of their children's lives. (2019-12-13)
Women wearing hijabs in news stories may be judged negatively
Women wearing a veil or headscarf in the United States may face harsher social judgement, according to a study by Penn State researchers that found when given the same information in a news story, some people may consider a woman wearing a headscarf to be more likely to have committed a crime. (2019-12-03)
One third of UK doctors may suffer from workplace 'burnout'
One in three UK doctors working in obstetrics and gynecology may suffer from workplace burnout, which could affect their wellbeing and how they treat patients. (2019-11-25)
Would people be willing to give their personal data for research?
New research led by the University of Bristol has found that over half of people would be willing to donate their personal data for research to benefit the wider general public. (2019-11-20)
Narcissism can lower stress levels and reduce chances of depression
People who have grandiose narcissistic traits are more likely to be 'mentally tough,' feel less stressed and are less vulnerable to depression, research led by Queen's University Belfast has found. (2019-10-29)
Mindfulness meditation enhances positive effects of psilocybin
Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the clinical application of classic psychedelics in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. (2019-10-24)
Brain imaging reveals neural correlates of human social behavior
Advances in the study of human social behavior may lead to a better understanding of normal processes such as empathy and theory of mind, as well as dysregulated conditions including autism spectrum disorder. (2019-10-22)
Mothers' behavior influences bonding hormone oxytocin in babies
A new epigenetic study now suggests that mothers' behavior can also have a substantial impact on their children's developing oxytocin systems. (2019-10-16)
Why rats prefer company of the young and stressed
Researchers have identified a neural pathway implicated in social interaction between adult and juvenile animals, according to new research in rats published in JNeurosci. (2019-10-10)
Poorly reported placebos could lead to mistaken estimates of benefits and harms
Researchers at the University of Oxford have found that placebo controls are almost never described according to standard reporting guidelines. (2019-09-29)
Standardized medical residency exam may reduce pool of diverse and qualified candidates
Test scores bias entry to radiation-oncology residency programs, and potentially other programs. (2019-09-11)
Adolescents' fun seeking predicts both risk taking and prosocial behavior
Research shows that risk-taking behaviors, such as binge drinking, may increase throughout adolescence. (2019-08-27)
Do single people suffer more?
Researchers at the University of Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology (UMIT, Hall, Austria) and the University of the Balearic Islands (Palma de Mallorca, Spain) have confirmed the analgesic effects of social support - even without verbal or physical contact. (2019-08-23)
Research shows TCOM and osteopathic approach making a difference
The 2.5-year study, conducted by the PRECISION Pain Research Registry and TCOM's John Licciardone, D.O., M.S., M.B.A., reaffirmed the importance of empathy and better interpersonal manner when treating patients with chronic pain. (2019-08-19)
Empathy for perpetrators helps explain victim blaming in sexual harassment
Men's empathy for other men who sexually harass women may help explain why they are more likely to blame victims, new research suggests. (2019-08-18)
In product design, imagining end user's feelings leads to more original outcomes
In new product design, connecting with an end user's heart, rather than their head, can lead to more original and creative outcomes, says published research co-written by Ravi Mehta, a professor of business administration at Illinois and an expert in product development and marketing. (2019-08-15)
'Fat suit' role play may help uncover medical student prejudices against obesity
Getting patients to wear an obesity simulation suit, popularly known as a 'fat suit', may prove a useful teaching aid and help to uncover medical student prejudice against obesity, suggests a proof of concept study published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-08-05)
Babies display empathy for victims as early as 6 months -- Ben-Gurion U. researchers
'The findings indicate that even during a baby's first year, the infant is already sensitive to others' feelings and can draw complicated conclusions about the context of a particular emotional display,' says Dr. (2019-07-29)
Researchers suggest empathy be a factor in medical school admissions
The national norms can help to distinguish between two applicants with similar academic qualifications, and identify students who might need additional educational remedies to bolster their level of empathy. (2019-07-25)
Study finds transgender, non-binary autism link
New research indicates that transgender and non-binary individuals are significantly more likely to have autism or display autistic traits than the wider population -- a finding that has important implications for gender confirmation treatments. (2019-07-16)
Adults with HIV who have compassionate care providers start and remain in treatment longer
Rutgers researchers find patients who perceive their primary care providers as lacking empathy and not willing to include them in decision making are at risk for abandoning treatment or not seeking treatment at all. (2019-07-14)
Unprecedented display of concern towards unknown monkey offers hope for endangered species
A wild group of endangered Barbary macaques have been observed, for the first time, 'consoling' and adopting an injured juvenile from a neighboring group. (2019-07-10)
Diabetes patients experiencing empathy from PCPs have lower risk of mortality
A United Kingdom study designed to examine the association between primary care practitioner empathy and incidence of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality among type 2 diabetes patients found that those patients experiencing greater empathy in the year following their diagnosis saw beneficial long-term clinical outcomes. (2019-07-10)
Antidepressants can reduce the empathic empathy
Depression is a disorder that often comes along with strong impairments of social functioning. (2019-06-18)
Autism linked to less empathy in general population -- but that may not be a bad thing
The psychologists behind the research hope their insights can help the autistic community and those around them in adapting support available. (2019-06-07)
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