Current Energy consumption News and Events

Current Energy consumption News and Events, Energy consumption News Articles.
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Chia, goji & co. -- BfR consumer monitor special superfoods
Chia seeds, goji berries or quinoa -- 48% of the population see so-called 'superfoods' as part of a health-conscious diet. This is shown by a recent representative survey by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). (2020-11-25)

Attosecond interferometry in time-energy domain
Analogous to the conventional spatial double-slit experiment, the time domain Young's experiment can be realized by using temporal slits for diffraction instead, and fringes in the energy domain are expected. As a time-energy domain interferometric device, the temporal Young's interferometer is anticipated to possess advantageous time resolving capability and holds the promise of tracking ultrafast processes. Scientists from China developed an all-optical attosecond few-slit interferometer and demonstrated its applications in time-energy domain high precision measurement (2020-11-24)

Stirling research evaluates effectiveness of conservation efforts
New research from the University of Stirling into the effectiveness of international conservation projects could help to save endangered species from extinction. (2020-11-23)

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 via pork meat unlikely according to current state of knowledge
State media in China have claimed that a worker has become infected with the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) from a knuckle of pork imported from Germany. The infection is reported to have taken place in a cold store. Traces of SARS-CoV-2 were detected on packaging as well as on a door knob. (2020-11-19)

Using materials efficiently can substantially cut greenhouse gas emissions
Emissions from the production of materials like metals, minerals, woods and plastics more than doubled in 1995 - 2015, accounting for almost one-quarter of all greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Material efficiency needs to play a larger role in climate planning, a new report says. (2020-11-18)

Report: In retrospect, the burning of wood in district heating plants has resulted in climate saving
A new report from the University of Copenhagen shows that the burning of wood is significantly more climate friendly than coal and slightly more climate friendly than natural gas over the long run. For the first time, researchers quantified what the conversion of 10 Danish cogeneration plants from coal or natural gas to biomass has meant for their greenhouse gas emissions. (2020-11-17)

Farms, tables and vast impacts between and beyond
New sustainability science tools show places that have no major stake in the plant-water-eat game end up paying an environmental price. (2020-11-17)

NREL advanced manufacturing research moves wind turbine blades toward recyclability
A new material for wind blades that can be recycled could transform the wind industry, rendering renewable energy more sustainable than ever before while lowering costs in the process. The use of a thermoplastic resin has been validated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Researchers demonstrated the feasibility of thermoplastic resin by manufacturing a 9-meter-long wind turbine blade using this novel resin, which was developed by a Pennsylvania company called Arkema Inc. (2020-11-17)

Peel-off coating keeps desalination cleaner and greener
A polyelectrolyte coating enables clean seawater desalination systems without harmful chemicals. (2020-11-16)

People in developing countries eat less bushmeat as they migrate from rural to urban areas
New Princeton University research finds that when people in developing countries move from rural areas to cities, they consume less bushmeat over time, perhaps because other sources of animal protein are more readily available (2020-11-16)

Go (over) easy on the eggs: 'Egg-cess' consumption linked to diabetes
Scrambled, poached or boiled, eggs are a popular breakfast food the world over. Yet the health benefits of the humble egg might not be all they're cracked up to be as new research from the University of South Australia shows that excess egg consumption can increase your risk of diabetes. (2020-11-14)

Researchers discover a new way to produce hydrogen using microwaves
A team of researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de València and the Spanish National Research Council has discovered a new method that makes it possible to transform electricity into hydrogen or chemical products by solely using microwaves - without cables and without any type of contact with electrodes. (2020-11-11)

Sweet taste reduces appetite?
To date, very little is known about how sweetness perception contributes to satiety. This study, conducted by an Austrian-German team led by chemists Veronika Somoza and Barbara Lieder, provides new insights into the relationship between the sweet taste of sugar, energy intake and the regulatory process of hunger and satiety. The study was published in the journal 'Nutrients'. (2020-11-10)

UChicago scientists uncover secrets to designing brain-like devices
Pritzker Molecular Engineering researchers predicted design rules for devices that mimic what occurs in our brain's neurons and synapses. (2020-11-10)

One third of UK fruit and vegetables are imported from climate-vulnerable countries
One third of UK fruit and vegetables are imported from climate-vulnerable countries - and this is on the rise. Researchers call for a radical rethink of our trade strategies to ensure people in the UK have continued access to fruit and vegetables. (2020-11-09)

New insights into 3D printing of spacers and membranes
To also address the controversies on the feasibility of 3D printing for membranes, researchers from SUTD and NTU have coined a new term 'hybrid additive manufacturing' for the water treatment industry. (2020-11-06)

?NTU scientists develop energy-saving 'liquid window'
Scientists at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a liquid window panel that can simultaneously block the sun to regulate solar transmission, while trapping thermal heat that can be released through the day and night, helping to reduce energy consumption in buildings. (2020-11-05)

Lockdown lifestyle link to poor mental health in Scotland
A rise in negative health behaviors - such as lack of sleep, exercise and an unhealthy diet -- is connected to poorer mental health during the tightest restrictions of Scotland's COVID-19 lockdown, a new study has confirmed. (2020-11-04)

Noise reduction via intermittent control by utilizing a plasma actuator
A research team at Toyohashi University of Technology developed a method for reducing aerodynamic noise via plasma. Cavity flow, such as the flow around car gaps of high-speed trains, often radiates aerodynamic noise. A plasma actuator inducing flow was applied to suppress this noise. By periodically switching off the power of the plasma actuator, a higher reduction in sound pressure level was observed when compared with continuous operation under the same power consumption. (2020-11-04)

Students develop tool to predict the carbon footprint of algorithms
Within the scientific community, it is estimated that artificial intelligence -- otherwise meant to serve as a means to effectively combat climate change -- will become one of the most egregious CO2 culprits should current trends continue. To raise awareness about the challenge, two University of Copenhagen students have launched a tool to calculate the carbon footprint of developing deep learning models. (2020-11-03)

The influence of social norms and behaviour on energy use
People tend to conform to what others do and what others regard as right. Do these two social norms influence electric energy consumption? In the prestigious journal Nature Energy, a team of Italian scientists have identified, for the first time, how these norms interact and influence the energy use of hundreds of thousands of Italian households. (2020-11-02)

Boosting the capacity of supercapacitors
Carefully designed covalent organic frameworks could make supercapacitor electrodes that have a greater ability to store electric charge. (2020-11-01)

Evolution of consumption: A psychological ownership framework
Technological innovations are rapidly changing how we consume goods and services. In many domains, we are trading ownership of private material goods for access to use shared and experiential goods and services. This article outlines how the downstream effects of these consumption changes are channeled through their influence on psychological ownership--the feeling that a thing is MINE. (2020-10-30)

Advanced facade material for urban heat island mitigation
A joint research team of Toyohashi University of Technology and Osaka City University has proposed two analytical models to evaluate the reflection directional characteristics of retro-reflective (RR) materials applied to building envelopes for urban heat island (UHI) mitigation, based on the measured data of optical experiments. The predication result of the anisotropic body of rotation of the normal distribution function (AND) model is more accurate than that of the original analytical model. (2020-10-29)

Sensors driven by machine learning sniff-out gas leaks fast
A new study confirms the success of a natural-gas leak-detection tool pioneered by Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists that uses sensors and machine learning to locate leak points at oil and gas fields, promising new automatic, affordable sampling across vast natural gas infrastructure. (2020-10-29)

Muscle pain and energy-rich blood: Cholesterol medicine affects the organs differently
Contrary to expectation, treatment with statins has a different effect on blood cells than on muscle cells, a new study from the University of Copenhagen reveals. Today, statins are mainly used in the treatment of elevated cholesterol, but the new results may help design drugs for a number of conditions. (2020-10-29)

Resistance and challenges to Green Deals should not be underestimated
A Perspective by the EASAC Environment Steering Panel (2020-10-29)

Menstrual dysfunction is more common among young athletes than among non-athletes
Menstrual dysfunction is more prevalent in young Finnish athletes than it is among non-athletes of a similar age, but athletes experience less body weight dissatisfaction than non-athletes do. These findings are from a recent study at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The study was conducted among members of sports clubs who exercised at least four times a week (athletes) and non-members (non-athletes). (2020-10-28)

RUDN University chemist suggested increasing the biofuel production efficiency with silica-supported
A chemist from RUDN University developed a silica-supported heteropolyacid system to produce ethers from waste products of the wood and paper industry and agriculture. Ethers can be used as biofuels, and the new method increases the efficiency of their production 4 to 10 times, thus reducing energy consumption and making the manufacturing of biofuels cheaper. (2020-10-28)

Burning biomass fuels at home led to 32% of premature deaths from inhaling fine particles in China in 2014
The burning of biomass fuels such as wood and crop residues, which are often used for cooking and heating homes in rural China, contributed to 32% of an estimated 1,150,000 premature deaths caused by inhaling fine particle pollutants in China in 2014, according to a new study. Residential energy use of all types led to 67% of these premature deaths overall, the findings (2020-10-28)

Brazilian researchers discover how muscle regenerates after exercise
Adaptation of muscle tissue to aerobic exercise alters the metabolism of muscle stem cells, helping them recover from injury. Findings may contribute to treatment of cachexia, sarcopenia and other conditions associated with lean mass loss. (2020-10-28)

Water consumption for trees is calculated in order to design precision irrigation systems
A University of Cordoba and Spanish National Research Council research team validated an indicator based on using a tree's temperature to calculate relative water consumption at an almond tree plantation (2020-10-27)

A question of affinity
A collaboration of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Germany and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia have recently scrutinized organic solar cells and derived design rules for light-absorbing dyes that can help to make these cells more efficient, while tailoring the absorption spectrum of the cells to the needs of the chosen application. (2020-10-27)

Renewable energy targets can undermine sustainable intentions
Renewable energy targets (RETs) may be too blunt a tool for ensuring a sustainable future, according to University of Queensland-led research. PhD candidate Scott Spillias, from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said that, while RETs are a go-to for policymakers, more nuanced approaches were more effective at actually achieving holistic, sustainable outcomes. (2020-10-27)

Robots help to answer age-old question of why fish school
Study using biomimetic fish-like robots shows that swimming closely together offers fish hydrodynamic benefits - research project with participation from University of Konstanz researchers provides first experimental validation of an answer to an old question. (2020-10-26)

Mythbusting: 5 common misperceptions surrounding the environmental impacts of single-use plastics
Stand in the soda pop aisle at the supermarket, surrounded by rows of brightly colored plastic bottles and metal cans, and it's easy to conclude that the main environmental problem here is an overabundance of single-use containers: If we simply recycled more of them, we'd go a long way toward minimizing impacts. (2020-10-26)

Globalized economy making water, energy and land insecurity worse: Study
The first large-scale study of the risks that countries face from dependence on water, energy and land resources has found that globalisation may be decreasing, rather than increasing, the security of global supply chains. (2020-10-25)

Turning streetwear into solar power plants
Researchers at Empa and ETH Zurich succeeded in developing a material that works like a luminescent solar concentrator and can even be applied to textiles. This opens up numerous possibilities for producing energy directly where it is needed, i.e. in the use of everyday electronics. (2020-10-22)

Tel Aviv University researchers discover molecular link between diet and risk of cancer
An international team of researchers has identified a direct molecular link between meat and dairy diets and the development of antibodies in the blood that increase the chances of developing cancer. This connection may explain the high incidence of cancer among those who consume large amounts of dairy products and red meat, similar to the link between high cholesterol and an increased risk of heart disease. (2020-10-22)

Vitamin A boosts fat burning in cold conditions
A recent study conducted by a research team led by Florian Kiefer from MedUni Vienna's Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism shows that cold ambient temperatures increase vitamin A levels in humans and mice. This helps convert ''bad'' white adipose tissue into ''good'' brown adipose tissue which stimulates fat burning and heat generation. (2020-10-21)

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