Current Engineering News and Events

Current Engineering News and Events, Engineering News Articles.
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Increasing diversity and community participation in environmental engineering
Black, Hispanic, and Native American students and faculty are largely underrepresented in environmental engineering programs in the ) States. A pathway for increasing diversity and community participation in the environmental engineering discipline (2020-11-19)

Removal of synthetic estrogen from water
Synthetic estrogens from pharmaceuticals contaminate rivers and threaten the health of humans and fish. An effective and cost-efficient method for removing synthetic estrogen from bodies of water (2020-10-20)

Gel instrumental in 3D bioprinting biological tissues
The eventual creation of replacement biological parts requires fully three-dimensional capabilities that two-dimensional and three-dimensional thin-film bioprinting cannot supply. Now, using a yield stress gel, Penn State engineers can place tiny aggregates of cells exactly where they want to build the complex shapes that will be necessary to replace bone, cartilage and other tissues. (2020-10-16)

Microbubbles controlled by acoustical tweezers for highly localized drug release
Microbubbles are used every day as contrast agents in medical sonography, and are the subject of intense research for the delivery of therapeutic agents. There are a number of options available to manipulate these microbubbles, including the use of light and sound. Researchers show that it is entirely possible to manipulate microbubbles through the use of ''acoustical tweezers''. (2020-06-22)

A robot to track and film flying insects
French scientists have developed the first cable-driven robot that can follow and interact with free-flying insects. With the help of this ''lab-on-cables,'' which is equipped with cameras and a controller that minimizes tracking errors between the insect's and the robot's position, they successfully studied the free flight of moths up to a speed of 3 metres/second. (2020-06-10)

Researchers identify breaking point of conducting material
An improved method to predict the temperature when plastics change from supple to brittle, which could potentially accelerate future development of flexible electronics, was developed by Penn State College of Engineering researchers. (2020-03-04)

New mathematical model shows how diversity speeds consensus
Scientific literature abounds with examples of ways in which member diversity can benefit a group -- whether spider colonies' ability to forage or an industrial company's financial performance. Now, a newly published mathematical framework substantiates the seemingly counterintuitive observations made by prior scholars: interaction among dissimilar individuals can speed consensus. (2020-01-08)

Climate engineering should not be considered a public good, new research shows
According to researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, calling climate engineering a public good misrepresents the technical definition of a public good and doesn't account for the potentially negative impacts of climate engineering. (2019-10-31)

Examination of conscience on the role of engineering in sustainable development
In a study conducted by 3 engineers, Josep Maria Basart (UAB), Mireia Farrús (UPF) and Montse Serra (UOC) presented in an article published in September in the journal IEEE Technology and Society Magazine. (2019-10-29)

$4.6 million award creates program to train cybersecurity professionals
A five-year, $4.63 million award from the National Science Foundation will enable a multi-disciplinary team of researchers at the University of Arkansas to create a program to recruit, educate and train the next generation of cybersecurity professionals. (2019-07-16)

City College-led experts develop flood prediction model
The duration of floods can be determined by river flow, precipitation and atmospheric blocking. Now an international team of researchers led by Nasser Najibi and Naresh Devineni at The City College of New York is offering a novel physically based Bayesian network model for inference and prediction of flood duration. The model also accurately examines the timescales of flooding. (2019-07-15)

New e-tattoo enables accurate, uninterrupted heart monitoring for days
A new wearable technology, developed by engineers at the University of Texas at Austin, that is made from stretchy, lightweight material, could make heart health monitoring easier and more accurate. (2019-06-20)

Intercultural communication crucial for engineering education
In an increasingly connected world it helps to engage with other cultures without prejudice or assumption. This is true in engineering as it is in any other field, but UTokyo researchers reveal shortcomings in how intercultural communication is taught to potential engineers. (2019-06-06)

Nipple reconstruction techniques could be improved with 3D scaffolds
Nipple and areola reconstruction is a common breast reconstruction technique, especially for breast cancer patients after mastectomy. However, tissue for grafting is a limiting factor, and there is no gold standard method. Correspondingly, researchers are continuously exploring new methods for the expansion of patient-matched tissue samples and the improvement of cosmetic outcome. (2019-05-13)

Study explores why 'progressive teetotalers' may emerge from college engineering programs
First-year engineering students who gravitate toward progressive ideas, including about gender equity in the workplace, tend to drink less alcohol, according to a study by a University of Kansas researcher. (2019-03-25)

A comprehensive metabolic map for production of bio-based chemicals
A KAIST research team completed a metabolic map that charts all available strategies and pathways of chemical reactions that lead to the production of various industrial bio-based chemicals. (2019-01-14)

Crashes increase when speed limits dip far below engineering recommendation
Speed limits set only five miles per hour below engineering recommendations produce a statistically significant decrease in total, fatal and injury crashes, and property-damage-only crashes, according to a group of Penn State researchers. (2018-12-12)

Power of tiny vibrations could inspire novel heating devices
Ultra-fast vibrations can be used to heat tiny amounts of liquid, experts have found, in a discovery that could have a range of engineering applications. (2018-09-10)

Most Americans accept genetic engineering of animals that benefits human health
Americans' views of possible uses of genetic engineering in animals vary depending on the mechanism and intended purpose of the technology, particularly the extent to which it would bring health benefits to humans. (2018-08-16)

New guide: How science academies can support the sustainable development goals
The United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development identified 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) whose realization will require expertise from many sectors, including science, engineering, and medicine. Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals: A Guide for Merit-Based Academies, a new publication from the InterAcademy Partnership, explains why and how academies around the globe can support the Sustainable Development Goals - for example, by providing advice to governments about implementing the goals, and by monitoring and evaluating progress toward the goals. (2017-12-06)

A new way to do metabolic engineering
University of Illinois researchers have created a novel metabolic engineering method that combines transcriptional activation, transcriptional interference, and gene deletion, and executes them simultaneously, making the process faster and easier. (2017-11-28)

Public -- and researchers -- skeptical to climate engineering
What does the general public know about climate engineering, and what do they think about what they know? These were questions asked by researchers from Linköping University, together with researchers from Japan, the US and New Zealand. (2017-11-15)

Bacterial outer membrane vesicles: An emerging tool in vaccine development
Outer membrane vesicles, biological nanoparticles shed during normal growth by bacteria, have seen significant recent advances in engineering and are thus finding new utility as therapeutic and drug delivery agents. One specific research focus explored recently in the literature is the use of bacterial vesicles as adjuvants in vaccine formulations. (2017-09-26)

Cutting the cost of ethanol, other biofuels and gasoline
Biofuels like the ethanol in US gasoline could get cheaper thanks to experts at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and Michigan State University. They've demonstrated how to design and genetically engineer enzyme surfaces so they bind less to corn stalks and other cellulosic biomass, reducing enzyme costs in biofuels production, according to a study published this month on the cover of the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering. (2017-07-05)

Russian scientists create new system of concrete building structures
Professor of the Institute of Civil Engineering of Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) Andrey Ponomarev and a graduate student Alexander Rassokhin developed a new construction technology. Scientists created several types of building blocks based on nanostructured high-strength lightweight concrete, reinforced with skew-angular composite coarse grids. (2017-04-24)

Sharing expert experimental knowledge to expedite design
A new repository of metabolic information provides a quick tool for designing useful synthetic biological systems. (2017-03-28)

Biomedical Engineering hosts national conference on STEM education for underserved students
The University of Akron hosts a national conference aimed at ensuring underserved students have access to opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Taking place March 8-10, 2017, the conference is expected to draw 200 K-12 teachers and academics from across the nation. Through workshops and speakers, attendees explore why participation lags among underrepresented racial, ethnic and socioeconomic students. The LeBron James Family Foundation, NASA Glenn Research Center, and Facing History will be presenters. (2017-03-03)

Making metabolically active brown fat from white fat-derived stem cells
Researchers have demonstrated the potential to engineer brown adipose tissue, which has therapeutic promise to treat metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, from white adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). (2017-03-03)

3-D-printed bioabsorbable scaffold for ACL reconstruction with bone regeneration
Researchers have designed a 3-D-printed porous scaffold for use in reconstructing ruptured anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) in the knee and engineered it to deliver a human bone-promoting protein over an extended period of time to improve bone regeneration. (2017-02-27)

Tissue-engineered model developed to study bone-invading tumor
Researchers have used tissue engineering to create models for studying the bone-destroying activity of tumors such as the aggressive pediatric cancer Ewing's sarcoma. (2017-02-24)

UConn to speed human limb growth
The University of Connecticut has joined the Advanced Regenerative Manufacturing Institute as a partner for the purpose of sharing its revolutionary human tissue and limb regeneration technologies. (2017-02-17)

UM announces creation of the Frost Institutes for Science and Engineering
The University of Miami announced Monday that it is creating the Frost Institutes for Science and Engineering to achieve those milestones by elevating science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. (2017-01-23)

Role of protein engineering techniques in synthetic biology
Proteins are the major biochemical workhorses that carry out multitude of physiological functions in an organism. The astonishing feature of the proteins is their ability to accomplish their specific functionalities under in vitro conditions. Protein engineering has been a powerful tool in synthetic biology for last couple of decades. Protein engineering has been employed to generate vast numbers of enzymes/proteins possessing immense therapeutic and industrial potential. (2017-01-11)

Rudolph's antlers inspire next generation of unbreakable materials
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered the secret behind the toughness of deer antlers and how they can resist breaking during fights. (2016-12-19)

Praise for polymer science
Engineer Glenn Fredrickson receives the William H. Walker Award for Excellence in Contributions to Chemical Engineering Literature. (2016-12-06)

NYU Tandon's Elza Erkip garners prestigious engineering award
Elza Erkip, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, will be the 2016 recipient of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Women in Communications Engineering Award for her outstanding technical work in communications engineering and for bringing a high degree of visibility to the field. As a faculty member of NYU WIRELESS, Erkip has conducted work that has made significant advances in communications technology. (2016-12-01)

AAAS and Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering announce 2016 Fellows
James H. Garrett, Jr., and Vijayakumar Bhagavatula of Carnegie Mellon College of Engineering have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. (2016-11-21)

UBC research offers faster way to confirm safety of oil and gas pipelines
A simple vibration test can help oil and gas companies prevent pipeline spills in a way that is faster and cheaper than conventional methods, a UBC study shows. The study, conducted at UBC's Okanagan campus, found pipeline imperfections could be identified by 'tapping' the side of a pipe and then measuring the resulting vibrations, known as modal analysis, against the vibrations predicted by computer models. (2016-10-18)

Louisiana Tech University professor develops new mechanism for strengthening materials
Dr. Kasra Momeni, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Advanced Hierarchical Materials by Design Lab at Louisiana Tech University, has discovered a new mechanism for strengthening nanomaterials and tailoring their properties to build superior structures. (2016-10-04)

OU professor David A. Sabatini named 2016 recipient of national award for global outreach
University of Oklahoma Professor David A. Sabatini is the recipient of a national award for outstanding contributions and demonstrated leadership through involvement in environmental engineering and science outreach activities to the global community. Sabatini will receive the Steven K. Dentel Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors Award for Global Outreach at the Water Environment Federation's Annual Technical Exhibition and Conference in New Orleans on Sept. 26. (2016-08-24)

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