Current Epidemiology News and Events

Current Epidemiology News and Events, Epidemiology News Articles.
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Study finds antibiotics before age 2 associated with childhood health issues
In a retrospective case study, Mayo Clinic researchers have found that antibiotics administered to children younger than 2 are associated with several ongoing illnesses or conditions, ranging from allergies to obesity. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2020-11-16)

Decennial 2020 research sets the agenda for advancing safe healthcare
More than 700 studies, including 250 international abstracts, highlighting worldwide progress in preventing and controlling healthcare-associated infections and addressing antibiotic resistance were published today as part of the proceedings from the Sixth Decennial International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections. The Sixth Decennial, a conference co-hosted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and SHEA, was cancelled in March due to the COVID-19 pandemic. All abstracts accepted for the meeting appear in a supplement for the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. (2020-11-02)

Hospital floors are hotspot for bacteria, creating route of transfer to patients
The floors of hospital rooms are frequently contaminated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria within hours of patient admission, creating a route of transfer of potentially dangerous organisms to patients, according to a study published today as part of the proceedings from Decennial 2020: The Sixth International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections. Decennial 2020, an initiative of the CDC and SHEA, was cancelled in March due to the pandemic. (2020-10-30)

State gun laws may help curb violence across state lines: study
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers find that strong state firearm laws are associated with fewer firearm homicides--both within the state where the laws are enacted and across state lines. Conversely, weak firearm laws in one state are linked to higher rates of homicides in neighboring states. (2020-10-26)

SHEA updates guidance for healthcare workers with HIV, hepatitis
In light of the low rate of transmission and advances in treatments for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV, SHEA released updated guidance for healthcare personnel living with these bloodborne pathogens based on the latest available science. The SHEA White Paper, ''Management of Healthcare Personnel Living with Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus in United States Healthcare Institutions,'' was published online in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. (2020-10-14)

Risk of self-harm increases for boys and girls who experience earlier puberty
Boys and girls who experience puberty earlier than their peers have an increased risk of self-harm in adolescence, a study funded by the National Institute for Health Research Bristol Biomedical Research Centre (NIHR Bristol BRC) and published in the journal Epidemiology & Psychiatric Sciences today [Tuesday 6 October] has found. (2020-10-06)

Study supports airborne spread of COVID-19 indoors
New research from the University of Georgia supports growing evidence for airborne transmission of COVID-19 in enclosed spaces. (2020-09-29)

Age restrictions for handguns make little difference in homicides
In the United States, individual state laws barring 18- to 20-year-olds from buying or possessing a handgun make little difference in the rate of homicides involving a gun by people in that age group, a new University of Washington study has found. (2020-09-24)

Children who take steroids at increased risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clots
Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to Rutgers researchers. The Rutgers study is the first to quantify these complications of oral steroids in a nationwide population of children. (2020-09-17)

SHEA endorses requiring recommended vaccinations for healthcare personnel, educators and students
All healthcare personnel should be immunized against vaccine preventable diseases recommended by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (CDC/ACIP) as a condition of employment, according to a new policy statement by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The broad statement of support of the vaccination recommendations, published in the journal Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, suggests medical contraindications as the only exception to receiving recommended immunizations. (2020-09-17)

Guidance balances staph infection prevention in critically ill infants with family contact
NICUs should balance prevention of Staph infections in critically ill infants with the need for skin-to-skin contact with parents and siblings, according to a Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America white paper published in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. The paper serves as a clinical companion to the new recommendations from the CDC's Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee to help clinicians in NICUs make decisions about infection prevention, detection, and control practices. (2020-09-14)

Prior health insurance coverage disruptions linked to issues with healthcare access
A new American Cancer Society study finds health insurance coverage disruptions in the prior year led to issues with healthcare access and affordability for currently insured cancer survivors. The study appears in the Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2020-08-31)

Elderly in the US: Risk of dementia has been rising for years - instead of falling
Risk of cognitive impairment increased from 1996 to 2014. (2020-08-27)

Hydroxychloroquine reduces in-hospital COVID-19 mortality
An Italian observational study contributes to the ongoing debate regarding the use of hydroxychloroquine in the current pandemic. The research, conducted on 3,451 patients treated in 33 hospitals throughout the Italian territory, shows that the use of this drug reduces by 30% the risk of death in hospitalized patients affected by Covid-19. (2020-08-25)

Low 'good' cholesterol levels found in Latin America and the Caribbean
Low levels of HDL cholesterol, the so-called 'good' cholesterol, are the most common lipid disorder in countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, a new meta-analysis published in eLife shows. (2020-08-18)

A quick, cost-effective method to track the spread of COVID-19
A group of researchers have demonstrated that, from seven methods commonly used to test for viruses in untreated wastewater, an adsorption-extraction technique can most efficiently detect SARS-CoV-2. This gives us another tool to detect the presence and spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-08-12)

Aspirin may accelerate progression of advanced cancers in older adults
For older adults with advanced cancer, initiating aspirin may increase their risk of disease progression and early death. (2020-08-10)

High COVID-19 risk among health care workers, especially those from minority backgrounds
At the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in the US and the UK, frontline healthcare workers -- Black, Asian, and minority ethnic backgrounds -- faced much higher risks of testing positive. (2020-07-31)

Laughter acts as a stress buffer -- and even smiling helps
People who laugh frequently in their everyday lives may be better equipped to deal with stressful events - although this does not seem to apply to the intensity of laughter. These are the findings reported by a research team from the University of Basel in the journal Plos One. (2020-07-30)

Racial discrimination may adversely impact cognition in African Americans
Experiences of racism are associated with lower subjective cognitive function (SCF) among African-American women. (2020-07-21)

Loss of a co-twin linked to heightened psychiatric risk
The death of a twin, especially earlier in life, can increase the risk of their surviving twin being diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder, finds a new study published today in eLife. (2020-07-14)

COVID-19: Cuba offers UK salutary lesson in 'shoe-leather' epidemiology
Cuba's successful containment of COVID-19 through door-to-door screening of every home in the country, shows how 'shoe-leather' epidemiology could have averted the dramatic failure of the UK's response to the pandemic. In Cuba there have been 2,173 confirmed cases and 83 deaths, with no reported deaths throughout the first week in June, 2020. (2020-07-14)

New model of breast cancer's causes developed by UCSF-led team
A new model of the causes of breast cancer, created by a team led by researchers at UC San Francisco, Genentech and Stanford University, is designed to capture the complex interrelationships between dozens of primary and secondary breast cancer causes and stimulate further research. (2020-07-08)

Healthcare facilities rapidly adapt & refine practices based on new evidence & supply shortages
Healthcare epidemiologists report using unprecedented methods in response to the unique circumstances resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the results of a new study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). Healthcare epidemiologists have been at the center of hospitals' responses to the challenges presented by limited supplies and emerging evidence. These professionals have used resourceful strategies to keep healthcare personnel and patients safe. (2020-06-23)

Obesity linked to higher dementia risk
Obesity is associated with a higher risk of dementia up to 15 years later, finds a new UCL study suggesting that weight management could play a significant role in reducing risk. (2020-06-23)

Pioneering research reveals certain human genes relate to gut bacteria
The role genetics and gut bacteria play in human health has long been a fruitful source of scientific enquiry, but new research marks a significant step forward in unraveling this complex relationship. Its findings could transform our understanding and treatment of all manner of common diseases, including obesity, irritable bowel syndrome, and Alzheimer's disease. (2020-06-22)

Children with developmental disabilities more likely to develop asthma
Children with developmental disabilities or delay are more at risk of developing asthma, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open led by public health researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) as part of the Center for Pediatric Population Health. (2020-06-16)

ModGraProDep: Artificial intelligence and probabilistic modelling in clinical oncology
Improving the prediction of survival indicators in patients with breast cancer using tools from artificial intelligence and probabilistic modelling is the aim of ModGraProDep, an innovative system presented in a study led by Ramon Clèries, lecturer at the Department of Clinical Sciences of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the University of Barcelona and member of the Oncology Master Plan/ICO-IDIBELL. The study has been published in the journal Artificial Intelligence in Medicine. (2020-06-11)

Northern California's COVID-19 epidemic resulted from multiple virus strains entering state
Distinct from virus transmission patterns identified elsewhere, analysis of SARS-CoV-2 genomes from a small number of California-based patients suggests the virus arrived in northern California through a complex series of introductions, not only from state to state but also from international travel. (2020-06-08)

Assessing cancer diagnosis in children with birth defects
In this study, led by Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, researchers provide a better understanding of cancer risk in children with birth defects. (2020-05-29)

SHEA helps hospitals navigate legal aspects of antibiotic
The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America today released a white paper outlining strategies for documenting the recommendations of antibiotic stewardship programs (ASP) and clarifying the stewardship team's role in patient care from a legal and quality improvement standpoint. The white paper, titled Legal Implications of Antibiotic Stewardship Programs, was published in the journal, Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. (2020-05-13)

Revealing links between education and a good diet
Educational status appears to have positive influence on a healthy diet, particularly in low income countries, according to new research examining European nutritional data. (2020-05-07)

Children born with a cleft lip unlikely to be genetically inclined to do poorly at school
New research has found that children born with a cleft lip, either with or without a cleft palate, are not likely to be genetically predisposed to do less well at school than their peers. The study by the Cleft Collective research team at the University of Bristol is published today in the International Journal of Epidemiology. (2020-05-06)

Researchers release COVID-19 symptom tracker app
Early use of the app by more than 2.5 million people in the US and the UK has generated valuable data about COVID-19 for physicians, scientists, and public officials to better fight the viral outbreak. (2020-05-05)

COVID-19 symptom tracker smartphone app could predict outbreak hotspots
Daily symptoms logged by more than two and a half million users of the COVID-19 Symptom Tracker, a mobile application launched in March 2020, suggest the tool could help to predict geographical hotspots of COVID-19 incidence up to a week in advance of official public health reports. (2020-05-05)

Scientists provide new insight on how bacteria share drug resistance genes
Researchers have been able to identify and track the exchange of genes among bacteria that allow them to become resistant to drugs, according to a new study published today in eLife. (2020-04-14)

Hong Kong study shows best practices protect healthcare workers from COVID-19
Health systems can protect healthcare workers during the COVID-19 outbreak when best practices for infection control are diligently applied along with lessons learned from recent outbreaks. Researchers from Queen Mary Hospital in Hong Kong reported that zero healthcare workers contracted COVID-19 and no hospital-acquired infections were identified after the first six weeks of the outbreak, even as the health system tested 1,275 suspected cases and treated 42 active confirmed cases of COVID-19. (2020-03-05)

Poor cleaning can jeopardize sterilization of medical tools
Vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP) failed to completely sterilize surgical tools 76% of the time when the tools were soiled with salts or blood and not cleaned prior to sterilization, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2020-02-26)

Drinking alcohol during pregnancy: #DRYMESTER the only safe approach
Drinking alcohol during pregnancy leads to poorer cognitive functioning in children, according to the most comprehensive review on the issue to date. The University of Bristol research published today [29 January] in the International Journal of Epidemiology, reviewed 23 published studies on the topic and found evidence that drinking in pregnancy could also lead to lower birthweight. (2020-01-28)

Tennessee review: 2% of providers account for 25% of pediatric antibiotic prescriptions
Fewer than 2% of providers accounted for 25% of antibiotic prescriptions for children in Tennessee, with the highest number of prescriptions coming from general pediatricians and those who graduated prior to 2000, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2020-01-15)

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