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Current Erosion News and Events

Current Erosion News and Events, Erosion News Articles.
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Sea level rise requires extra management to maintain salt marshes
Salt marshes are important habitats for fish and birds and protect coasts under sea level rise against stronger wave attacks. (2019-07-17)
More 'reactive' land surfaces cooled the Earth down
In a new study, researchers from ETH Zurich, Stanford University the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences show that a paradigm on a global temperature drop that started around 15 million years ago cannot be upheld. (2019-07-03)
Methane vanishing on Mars: Danish researchers propose new mechanism as an explanation.
Wind-driven erosion of minerals on Mars may be the reason why methane disappears so rapidly on the red planet. (2019-07-02)
Zipingpu Reservoir reveals climate-tectonics interplay around 2008 Wenchuan earthquake
A new study led by Prof. JIN Zhangdong from the Institute of Earth Environment (IEE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences provided a new insight on the interplay between climate and tectonics from a sediment record in the Zipingpu Reservoir around the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. (2019-06-18)
River sediment speaks to changing climate
Studying the sediment of a mountain river can reveal thousands of years or more of a waterway's history, including new threats from more frequent wildfires and increased precipitation brought by climate change. (2019-06-11)
Rapid retreat of Arctic coastline revealed in images from the air
Drone surveys have revealed extreme erosion on the Arctic coastline, highlight the ongoing change in the region in a warming climate. (2019-06-07)
Making a splash is all in the angle
Making a splash depends on the angle of a liquid as it hits and moves along a surface, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London. (2019-06-05)
'Lubricating' sediments were critical in making the continents move
Plate tectonics is a key geological process on Earth, shaping its surface, making it unique among the Solar System's planets. (2019-06-05)
Public health leaders call for new efforts to promote vaccination acceptance
On Thursday, an international coalition of public health leaders including CUNY SPH Dean Ayman El-Mohandes and Senior Scholar Scott Ratzan issued a statement asserting its commitment to vaccine acceptance around the world and to eliminating vaccine-preventable diseases, including childhood diseases such as measles, mumps, and rubella. (2019-05-30)
Dead roots double shoreline loss in gulf
A new Duke University-led study finds that the loss of marsh-edge salt grasses and mangroves due to disturbances such as heavy oiling from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill doubles the rate of shoreline erosion in hard-hit marshes. (2019-05-24)
Fragmented turtles
Scientists looked at how fragmentation is affecting critically endangered Dahl's toad headed turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli) a forest-stream specialist found only in Colombia. (2019-05-09)
New clues to coastal erosion
New research has uncovered a missing nutrient source in coastal oceans, which could promote better water quality and sand management on popular beaches. (2019-05-01)
US Southeast Atlantic coast facing high threat of sea-level rise in the next 10 years
New research shows 75% of the Atlantic coast from North Carolina to central Florida will be highly vulnerable to erosion and inundation from rising tides by 2030, negatively impacting many coastal species' nesting habitats. (2019-04-26)
33-year study shows increasing ocean winds and wave heights
Extreme ocean winds and wave heights are increasing around the globe, with the largest rise occurring in the Southern Ocean, University of Melbourne research shows. (2019-04-25)
Minerals in mountain rivers tell the story of landslide activity upstream
Scientists have come up with a new way of analyzing sand in mountain rivers to determine the activity of landslides upstream, which has important implications for understanding natural hazards in mountainous regions. (2019-04-24)
Post-wildfire step-pool streams
Steps and pools are among the most stable and functionally important features in the mountain river landscape. (2019-04-04)
Freshwater coastal erosion alters global carbon budget
Shoreline erosion can transform freshwater wetlands from carbon-storage pools to carbon sources, according to a new study led by Illinois State Geological Survey researchers. (2019-03-27)
Watching for 'bright lines' during the Trump presidency
For the past year and a half, Bright Line Watch, a non-partisan group of political scientists, has been surveying the American public and exports to gauge the state of the nation's democracy. (2019-03-12)
A common genetic signature has been discovered among three cancer prone rare skin diseases
A group of researchers lead by a lecturer from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), Marcela del Río, from the CIEMAT, the Rare Diseases Networking Biomedical Research Centre (Initials in Spanish: CIBERER-- ISCIII) and Fundación Jiménez Díaz has identified a common genetic signature among three rare skin diseases or genodermatoses: recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, Kindler syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. (2019-03-04)
Drilling results reveal global climate influence on basin waters in young rifts
New results from the Gulf of Corinth, Greece, a continental rift zone where the first stage of ocean basin formation is taking place, show how the environmental conditions and sediment input into the rift basin changed as the Earth alternated between non-glaciated to glaciated conditions over the last 500 thousand years. (2019-02-28)
More extreme coastal weather events likely to increase bluff erosion, landslide activity
Unstable slopes on Oregon's coastline could see a 30 percent jump in landslide movements if extreme storms become frequent enough to increase seacliff erosion by 10 percent, a new study by Oregon State University shows. (2019-02-26)
NASA finds possible second impact crater under Greenland ice
A NASA glaciologist has discovered a possible second impact crater buried under more than a mile of ice in northwest Greenland. (2019-02-11)
Interdisciplinary approach the only way to address devastating effects of soil erosion
A major international study led by the University of Plymouth has shown that traditional pastoralist communities -- such as the Maasai in East Africa -- are abundantly aware that climate change and intensive grazing are having a marked effect on the resources they rely on for survival. (2019-02-07)
Gypsum as an agricultural product
Gypsum, a source of calcium and sulfur, can benefit crops and soils. (2019-02-06)
Sharp bends make rivers wander
Left to their own devices and given enough time, rivers wander, eroding their banks and leaving their old channels behind. (2019-02-06)
Curiosity's first attempt at gravimetry advances martian geology
By cleverly repurposing a device onboard Curiosity normally used to detect the rover's movements on Mars to measure slight variations in gravitational fields instead, researchers have refined the understanding of how Gale crater and the mountain at its center formed. (2019-01-31)
New research uses Curiosity rover to measure gravity on Mars
A team of researchers repurposed navigational sensors aboard NASA's Curiosity rover, enabling the scientists to measure gravity on the lower slopes of Mount Sharp, a peak that rises from the center of Gale Crater. (2019-01-31)
Worms can process rice straw, scientists discover
A team of scientists from I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (MSMU) discovered that earthworms efficiently process rice straw and enrich the soil with organic matter increasing its fertility and preventing the burning of the straw that takes quite long to naturally decompose. (2019-01-24)
Ancient climate change triggered warming that lasted thousands of years
A rapid rise in temperature on ancient Earth triggered a climate response that may have prolonged the warming for many thousands of years, according to scientists. (2019-01-22)
Earth and moon pummeled by more asteroids since the age of dinosaurs, say scientists
The number of asteroids colliding with the Earth and moon has increased by up to three times over the past 290 million years, according to a major new study involving the University of Southampton. (2019-01-17)
SwRI scientists study moon craters to understand Earth's impact history
Using images and thermal data collected by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), Southwest Research Institute scientists and their collaborators have calculated the ages of large lunar craters across the moon to be less than 1 billion years. (2019-01-17)
Scientists find increase in asteroid impacts on ancient Earth by studying the Moon
A team of scientists has determined the number of asteroid impacts on the Moon and Earth increased by two to three times starting around 290 million years ago. (2019-01-17)
Seagrass saves beaches and money
Seagrass beds are so effective in protecting tropical beaches from erosion, that they can reduce the need for regular, expensive beach nourishments that are used now. (2019-01-02)
Seeing double: Tropical Cyclone Kenanga same strength as other storm
The Southern Indian Ocean is seeing double. Tropical Cyclone Kenanga was one of two storms at Category 2 hurricane strength in the Southern Indian Ocean on Dec. (2018-12-20)
Cover crops may increase winter temperatures in North America
Cover crops grown in fields during winter may be warming temperatures in the northern United States and southern Canada, according to a new study by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. (2018-12-19)
Restoring canals shown as cost-efficient way to reverse wetland loss
LSU Boyd Professor of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences R. Eugene Turner has determined a cost-effective way to prevent coastal erosion and protect Louisiana's wetlands. (2018-12-19)
'Treasure trove' of dinosaur footprints found in southern England
More than 85 well-preserved dinosaur footprints -- made by at least seven different species -- have been uncovered in East Sussex, representing the most diverse and detailed collection of these trace fossils from the Cretaceous Period found in the UK to date. (2018-12-17)
NSF-supported scientists present new research results on Earth's critical zone
To develop a deeper understanding of the critical zone, the National Science Foundation (NSF) supports nine Critical Zone Observatories (CZOs) across the US NSF CZO scientists study how the critical zone responds to changes in climate and land use. (2018-12-12)
Hypoxic dead zones found in urban streams, not just at the coast
A Duke-led study finds that hypoxic dead zones occur in nutrient-laden urban streams, not just in coastal waters. (2018-12-11)
What happens when materials take tiny hits
A team of researchers at MIT has just accomplished the first detailed high-speed imaging and analysis of the microparticle impact process, and used that data to predict when the particles will bounce away, stick, or knock material off the surface and weaken it. (2018-11-29)
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