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Current Evolution News and Events

Current Evolution News and Events, Evolution News Articles.
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Fossil of smallest old world monkey species discovered in Kenya
Researchers from the National Museums of Kenya, University of Arkansas, University of Missouri and Duke University have announced the discovery of a tiny monkey that lived in Kenya 4.2 million years ago. (2019-07-15)
The path to China's 'ecological civilization' starts with national parks
President Xi Jinping staked out China's role as a committed player to tackle the climate crisis and build an 'ecological civilization.' In a review published July 10 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, researchers discuss one of the Chinese government's efforts -- reforming the management of protected areas by streamlining agencies' responsibilities and reducing functional overlaps. (2019-07-10)
Body plan evolution not as simple as once believed
Hox gene do not work alone to determine the layout of vertebrae, limbs and other body parts. (2019-07-09)
Human pregnancy dependent on cells evolved in platypus-like animal 300 million years ago
Platelet cells, which prevent mammals from bleeding non-stop, first evolved around 300 million years ago in an egg-laying animal similar to the modern duck-billed platypus, finds joint research by UCL and Yale University. (2019-07-09)
Jurassic shift: Changing the rules of evolution
Is the success of species mainly dependent on environmental factors such as climate changes or do interactions between the species have a greater role to play? (2019-07-08)
Cultural drive breeds war in new evolutionary theory
A new evolutionary model shows that a cultural drive to fight for fighting's sake, even when there is no benefit for the winner, can explain the evolution of intergroup conflict in human societies. (2019-07-08)
Scientists invent fast method for 'directed evolution' of molecules
Scientists demonstrated the technique by evolving several proteins to perform precise new tasks, each time doing it in a matter of days. (2019-07-04)
Directed evolution comes to plants
Accelerating plant evolution with CRISPR paves the way for breeders to engineer new crop varieties. (2019-06-19)
Virus genes help determine if pea aphids get their wings
Researchers from the University of Rochester shed light on the important role that microbial genes, like those from viruses, can play in insect and animal evolution. (2019-06-14)
The use of mobile phone and the development of new pathologies
Professor Raquel Cantero of the University of Malaga (UMA) has identified a generational change in the use of this finger due to the influence of new technologies. (2019-06-13)
Oxygen shapes arms and legs: Origins of a new developmental mechanism called 'interdigital cell death'
Scientists at Tokyo Tech, Yamagata University and Harvard University have discovered that environmental oxygen plays an important role shaping the hands and feet during development. (2019-06-13)
Is sex primarily a strategy against transmissible cancer?
One of the greatest enigmas of evolutionary biology is that while sex is the dominant mode of reproduction among multicellular organisms, asexual reproduction appears much more efficient and less costly. (2019-06-06)
New genes out of nothing
One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. (2019-06-04)
Fathers aid development of larger brains
The bigger the brain, the more intelligent a mammalian species is. (2019-06-03)
Godzilla is back and he's bigger than ever: The evolutionary biology of the monster
Godzilla first made his debut in 1954 as a 50-meter tall metaphor for indiscriminate destruction, particularly US hydrogen-bomb testing in the Marshall Islands, which, in the film, destroyed Godzilla's deep-sea ecosystem. (2019-05-29)
How language developed: Comprehension learning precedes vocal production
Green monkeys' alarm calls allow conclusions about the evolution of language. (2019-05-27)
Conservation goals compete at the expense of biodiversity
With an ever-growing list of threats facing biodiversity on multiple scales, conservationists struggle to determine which to address. (2019-05-23)
Ernst Haeckel: Pioneer of modern science
Evolutionary biologist Ernst Haeckel became the first person to define the term ecology in his work published in 1866, entitled 'General Morphology of Organisms'. (2019-05-17)
Galaxy blazes with new stars born from close encounter
The irregular galaxy NGC 4485 shows all the signs of having been involved in a hit-and-run accident with a bypassing galaxy. (2019-05-16)
Tooth fossils fill 6-million-year-old gap in primate evolution
UNLV geoscientist, student among international research team behind discovery of ancient monkey species that lived in Africa 22 million years ago. (2019-05-14)
Multiple sclerosis: Discovery of a mechanism responsible for chronic inflammation
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease. The defense system that usually protects patients from external aggression turns on its own cells and attacks them for reasons that are not yet known. (2019-05-10)
New Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur sheds light on origin of flight in Dinosauria
A new Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur from 163-million-year-old fossil deposits in northeastern China provides new information regarding the incredible richness of evolutionary experimentation that characterized the origin of flight in the Dinosauria. (2019-05-08)
Oxygen variation controls episodic pattern of Cambrian explosion: study
A multidisciplinary study, published on May 6, 2019 in Nature Geoscience by a joint China-UK-Russia research team, gives strong support to the hypothesis that the oxygen content of the atmosphere and ocean was the principal controlling factor in early animal evolution. (2019-05-07)
Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet
Scientists at the University of Washington have discovered that two major forces have shaped bat skulls over their evolutionary history: echolocation and diet. (2019-05-02)
Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs
The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs. (2019-05-02)
Middle Pleistocene human skull reveals variation and continuity in early Asian humans
A team of scientists led by LIU Wu and WU Xiujie from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first ever Middle Pleistocene human skull found in southeastern China, revealing the variation and continuity in early Asian humans. (2019-04-30)
What the vibrant pigments of bird feathers can teach us about how evolution works
A UA team shows that evolution is driven by dependency on other species within ecological communities - testing a long-held idea of the UA's late, great George Gaylord Simpson. (2019-04-24)
Research sheds light on genomic features that make plants good candidates for domestication
New research details how the process of domestication affected the genomes of corn and soybeans. (2019-04-24)
Island lizards are expert sunbathers, and researchers find it's slowing their evolution
If you've ever spent some time in the Caribbean, you might have noticed that humans are not the only organisms soaking up the sun. (2019-04-22)
Geomagnetic jerks finally reproduced and explained
The Earth's magnetic field experiences unpredictable, rapid, and intense anomalies that are known as geomagnetic jerks. (2019-04-22)
The kids are alright
A new study reveals the surprising way that family quarrels in seeds drive rapid evolution. (2019-04-22)
Fish that outlived dinosaurs reveals secrets of ancient skull evolution
A new study into one of the world's oldest types of fish, coelacanth, provides fresh insights into the development of the skull and brain of vertebrates and the evolution of lobe-finned fishes and land animals, as published in Nature. (2019-04-17)
Need for social skills helped shape modern human face
As large-brained, short-faced hominins, our faces are different from other, now extinct hominins (such as the Neanderthals) and our closest living relatives (bonobos and chimpanzees), but how and why did the modern human face evolve this way? (2019-04-15)
The history of humanity in your face
The skull and teeth provide a rich library of changes that we can track over time, describing the history of evolution of our species. (2019-04-15)
Quantum simulation more stable than expected
A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. (2019-04-12)
Unique look at combined influence of pollinators and herbivores reveals rapid evolution of floral traits in plants
Pollinating bumblebees and butterflies help plants grow prettier flowers, but harmful herbivores don't, a new study shows. (2019-04-11)
Interplay of pollinators and pests influences plant evolution
Brassica rapa plants pollinated by bumblebees evolve more attractive flowers. (2019-04-11)
Evolution imposes 'speed limit' on recovery after mass extinctions
It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists. (2019-04-08)
Scientists explore causes of biodiversity in perching birds
New research by a global team of scientists has resulted in significant strides in ornithological classification and identified possible causes of diversity among modern bird species. (2019-04-05)
Screw-shaped bird sperm swim faster -- but it comes at a cost
New research from the Natural History Museum in Oslo suggests that bird sperm cells with a spiral or screw-like shape swim faster than straighter sperm -- but that the spiral shape also makes them more fragile. (2019-04-04)
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