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Current Evolution News and Events

Current Evolution News and Events, Evolution News Articles.
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Fish that outlived dinosaurs reveals secrets of ancient skull evolution
A new study into one of the world's oldest types of fish, coelacanth, provides fresh insights into the development of the skull and brain of vertebrates and the evolution of lobe-finned fishes and land animals, as published in Nature. (2019-04-17)
Need for social skills helped shape modern human face
As large-brained, short-faced hominins, our faces are different from other, now extinct hominins (such as the Neanderthals) and our closest living relatives (bonobos and chimpanzees), but how and why did the modern human face evolve this way? (2019-04-15)
The history of humanity in your face
The skull and teeth provide a rich library of changes that we can track over time, describing the history of evolution of our species. (2019-04-15)
Quantum simulation more stable than expected
A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. (2019-04-12)
Unique look at combined influence of pollinators and herbivores reveals rapid evolution of floral traits in plants
Pollinating bumblebees and butterflies help plants grow prettier flowers, but harmful herbivores don't, a new study shows. (2019-04-11)
Interplay of pollinators and pests influences plant evolution
Brassica rapa plants pollinated by bumblebees evolve more attractive flowers. (2019-04-11)
Evolution imposes 'speed limit' on recovery after mass extinctions
It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists. (2019-04-08)
Scientists explore causes of biodiversity in perching birds
New research by a global team of scientists has resulted in significant strides in ornithological classification and identified possible causes of diversity among modern bird species. (2019-04-05)
Screw-shaped bird sperm swim faster -- but it comes at a cost
New research from the Natural History Museum in Oslo suggests that bird sperm cells with a spiral or screw-like shape swim faster than straighter sperm -- but that the spiral shape also makes them more fragile. (2019-04-04)
Noncoding DNA drives the convergent loss of flight in flightless birds
Tucked away in the noncoding regions of bird DNA, researchers have discovered molecular roots of the loss of flight seen in so many disparate paleognathous birds. (2019-04-04)
Mosses -- Dynamic and built to last
New UConn research dives deep into the genetic history of mosses. (2019-04-02)
Can technology improve even though people don't understand what they are doing?
New experimental work by an ASU research team suggests that cultural evolution can generate new adaptive knowledge even though people don't understand what they are doing. (2019-04-01)
The evolution of bird-of-paradise sex chromosomes revealed
Birds-of-paradise are a group of songbird species, and are known for their magnificent male plumage and bewildering sexual display. (2019-04-01)
What is gender equality in science? Common solutions may not be solving the problem
Despite the scientific community taking action on gender inequality, the problem persists. (2019-03-27)
Cool Earth theory sheds more light on diamonds
A QUT geologist has published a new theory on the thermal evolution of Earth billions of years ago that explains why diamonds have formed as precious gemstones rather than just lumps of common graphite. (2019-03-26)
Nature hits rewind
The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature. (2019-03-19)
Bullying evolves with age and proves difficult to escape from
An international team from the Universities of Cordoba, Cambridge and Zurich conducted a study on bullying roles among peers. (2019-03-14)
Ancient records prompt rethink of animal evolution timeline
Scientists are rethinking a major milestone in animal evolution, after gaining fresh insights into how life on Earth diversified millions of years ago. (2019-03-11)
Genes that evolve from scratch expand protein diversity
A new study published in Nature Ecology and Evolution led by scientists from the University of Chicago challenges one of the classic assumptions about how new proteins evolve. (2019-03-11)
Stars exploding as supernovae lose their mass to companion stars during their lives
Stars over eight times more massive than the sun end their lives in supernovae explosions. (2019-03-07)
Climate-driven evolution in trees alters their ecosystems
A new study explores how climate, evolution, plants, and soils are linked. (2019-03-06)
Directed evolution builds nanoparticles
Directed evolution is a powerful technique for engineering proteins. EPFL scientists now show that it can also be used to engineer synthetic nanoparticles as optical biosensors, which are used widely in biology, drug development, and even medical diagnostics such as real-time monitoring of glucose. (2019-02-27)
Right- or left-handed? Gene expression tells the story of snail evolution
Snails, like humans, can be right-handed or left-handed and the swirl etched into the shell of a snail can reveal a lot about them, down to their genetic makeup. (2019-02-26)
How plants learned to save water
Plants that can manage with less water could make agriculture more sustainable. (2019-02-21)
New insights into phenotypic complexity and diversity among cichlids
Researchers from the University of Konstanz, the University of California-Los Angeles, Tel Aviv University and the Inter-University Institute for Marine Sciences in Eilat gain new in-sights into how phenotypic complexity influences diversification among Lake Malawi cichlid fish. (2019-02-19)
How our plants have turned into thieves to survive
Scientists have discovered that grasses are able to short cut evolution by taking genes from their neighbors. (2019-02-18)
Genetic tricks of rabbits resistant to fatal viral disease
Underlying genetic variation in the immune systems of rabbits allowed them to rapidly evolve genetic resistance to the myxoma virus, a deadly rabbit pathogen introduced into Europe and Australia during the 1950s, according to a new study. (2019-02-14)
Hop to it: Researchers evaluate rabbits' evolved resistance to myxoma virus
Partnering with the University of Cambridge and several other research institutes, Biodesign researchers, as part of Grant McFadden's Center of for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy, validated the role of specific rabbit genes in contributing to this acquired resistance in research published in Science Magazine. (2019-02-14)
Exceptional new titanosaur from middle Cretaceous Tanzania: Mnyamawamtuka
An exceptional sauropod dinosaur specimen from the middle Cretaceous of Tanzania represents a unique species and provides new insights into sauropod evolution, according to a study published Feb. (2019-02-13)
Anther rubbing, a new movement discovered in plants, promotes prior selfing
Most plants have developed mechanisms to prevent self-fertilization and its detrimental effects of inbreeding depression. (2019-02-08)
How one gene in a tiny fish may alter an aquatic ecosystem
Variations in a single gene in a tiny fish alter how they interact with their environment, according to research led by the University of Pennsylvania's Seth Rudman, a postdoctoral researcher. (2019-02-06)
Optimized binding cavity
The impressively high conversion rates of natural enzymes partly result from increasing the catalytic activity of a selected few amino acid side chains through precise positioning within the protein binding cavity. (2019-02-01)
How new species emerge
International research team reconstructs the evolutionary history of baboons. (2019-01-31)
A small fish provides insight into the genetic basis of evolution
Genetic analysis of sticklebacks shows that isolated populations in similar environments develop in comparable ways. (2019-01-30)
Bird beaks did not adapt to food types as previously thought
A study, led by the University of Bristol, has shed some new light on how the beaks of birds have adapted over time. (2019-01-22)
Size matters -- To livebearer fish, big fins are a big deal
In a new paper, biologists from the University of California, Riverside, studied the evolution of 40 molly and Limia species, and concluded dorsal fin displays arose first for males to compete with other males, only later being used in courtship displays to females. (2019-01-17)
Let's prepare now so farming insects as food is environmentally friendly, say scientists
As whole-roasted crickets gain traction as a protein-rich snack and restaurants experiment with mealworms on the menu, there's still 'an overwhelming lack of knowledge' concerning the ecological sustainability of the emerging, multi-million-dollar insects-as-food industry, say researchers at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. (2019-01-14)
Arbitrary quantum channel simulation for a superconducting qubit
Recently, a research team led by Prof. Luyan Sun from Tsinghua University has successfully demonstrated the arbitrary quantum channel simulation for a single qubit in a superconducting quantum circuits, which could be used for simulating the evolution of a quantum bit in arbitrary physical environment. (2019-01-11)
A new mechanism helps explain differences between eukaryotic and bacterial proteomes
The study, published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, has been headed by Lluís Ribas, at IRB Barcelona. (2019-01-11)
Evolution used same genetic formula to turn animals monogamous
According to a new study that looked at 10 species of vertebrates, evolution used a kind of universal formula for turning non-monogamous species into monogamous species -- turning up the activity of some genes and turning down others in the brain. (2019-01-07)
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