Nav: Home

Current Evolution News and Events

Current Evolution News and Events, Evolution News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Modern Melanesians harbor beneficial DNA from archaic hominins
Modern Melanesians harbor beneficial genetic variants that they inherited from archaic Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins, according to a new study. (2019-10-17)
The brain does not follow the head
The human brain is about three times the size of the brains of great apes. (2019-10-15)
Chemical evolution -- One-pot wonder
Before life, there was RNA: Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich show how the four different letters of this genetic alphabet could be created from simple precursor molecules on early Earth -- under the same environmental conditions. (2019-10-09)
Influenza evolution patterns change with time, complicating vaccine design
Skoltech scientists discovered new patterns in the evolution of the influenza virus. (2019-10-08)
New research furthers understanding about what shapes human gut microbiome
A new Northwestern University study finds that despite human's close genetic relationship to apes, the human gut microbiome is more similar to that of Old World monkeys like baboons than to that of apes like chimpanzees. (2019-10-07)
Confronting colony collapse
Researchers from the Ecology and Evolution Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) sequenced the genomes of the two Varroa mite species that parasitize the honey bee. (2019-10-03)
Understanding the genomic signature of coevolution
An international team of researchers including limnologists from the University of Konstanz shows that rapid genomic changes during antagonistic species interactions are shaped by the reciprocal effects of ecology and evolution. (2019-10-02)
CRISPR technology reveals secret in monarchs' survival
New research from Cornell University sheds light on the secret to the survival of monarch butterflies by revealing how the species developed immunity to fatal milkweed toxins. (2019-10-02)
250-million-year-old evolutionary remnants seen in muscles of human embryos
A team of evolutionary biologists have demonstrated that some limb muscles known to be present in many mammals but absent in the adult human are actually formed during early human development and then lost prior to birth. (2019-10-01)
Why are there no animals with three legs?
If 'Why?' is the first question in science, 'Why not?' must be a close second. (2019-10-01)
How fungus-farming ants could help solve our antibiotic resistance problem
For the last 60 million years, fungus-growing ants have farmed fungi for food. (2019-09-26)
Catching evolution in the act
Researchers have produced some of the first evidence that shows that artificial selection and natural selection act on the same genes, a hypothesis predicted by Charles Darwin in 1859. (2019-09-26)
Evolution experiment: Specific immune response of beetles adapts to bacteria
The memory of the immune system is able to distinguish a foreign protein with which the organism has already come into contact from another and to react with a corresponding antibody. (2019-09-24)
Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence
Researchers at Michigan State University say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but their new paper published in The American Naturalist explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same way as natural organisms did -- with implications for many fields, including artificial intelligence. (2019-09-20)
Guppies teach us why evolution happens
New study on guppies shows that animals evolve in response the the environment they create in the absence of predators, rather than in response to the risk of being eaten. (2019-09-18)
'Game-changing' research could solve evolution mysteries
An evolution revolution has begun after scientists extracted genetic information from a 1.7-million-year-old rhino tooth -- the largest and oldest genetic data to ever be recorded. (2019-09-11)
Ground-breaking method to reconstruct the evolution of all species
By looking into fossil teeth from almost 2 million years old rhinos, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Cambridge launch a new molecular method for studying the evolutionary history of fossil species dating back millions of years. (2019-09-11)
Numerical simulations probe mechanisms behind sand dune formation
After noticing how the construction of dams significantly alter the hydrodynamics of natural rivers and the resulting downstream riverbed evolution, researchers decided to apply numerical simulations to help determine what's at play in the relationship of sediment motion and flow conditions. (2019-09-10)
Sexual selection influences the evolution of lamprey pheromones
In 'Intra- and Interspecific Variation in Production of Bile Acids that Act As Sex Pheromones in Lampreys,' published in Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, Tyler J. (2019-09-03)
Undercover evolution
Our individuality is encrypted in our DNA, but it is deeper than expected. (2019-09-03)
What drives plate tectonics?
Scientists found ''switches'' between continental rupture, continental collision, and oceanic subduction initiation in the Tethyan evolution after a reappraisal of geological records from the surface and new global-scale geophysical images at depth. (2019-09-02)
How worms snare their hosts
Acanthocephala are parasitic worms that reproduce in the intestines of various animals, including fish. (2019-08-27)
Bacterial sex drives evolution of microbes to conquer and colonize the gut
Healthy mice study real-time gut colonization and discovered a pivotal role for bacterial sex in the evolution of the mammalian microbiome. (2019-08-22)
Rapid evolution: New findings on its molecular mechanisms
Evolutionary biologists from Konstanz analyze the role of microRNAs in the evolution of new species. (2019-08-14)
Astronomers reveal true colors of evolving galactic beasts
Astronomers have identified a rare moment in the life of some of the universe's most energetic objects. (2019-08-07)
New Zealand's biodiversity will take millions of years to recover
The arrival of humans in New Zealand, some 700 years ago, triggered a wave of extinction among native bird species. (2019-08-05)
Symphony of genes
One of the most exciting discoveries in genome research was that the last common ancestor of all multicellular animals already possessed an extremely complex genome. (2019-08-05)
Genes that first enabled plants to grow leaves identified by scientists
The genes that first enabled plants to grow shoots and conquer the land have been identified by University of Bristol researchers. (2019-08-02)
Genomic data reveal intense fish harvesting causes rapid evolution
For the first time, scientists have unraveled genetic changes that cause rapid fish evolution due to intense harvesting -- changes that previously had been invisible to researchers. (2019-08-01)
Study reveals how bacteria beat immune systems
The evolution of more severe infections is not necessarily driven by bacteria multiplying faster, new research shows. (2019-07-29)
Origin of life: The importance of interfaces
Tiny gas-filled bubbles in the porous rock found around hot springs are thought to have played an important role in the origin of life. (2019-07-29)
Researchers show the importance of copy-number variants in the development of insecticide resistance in malaria mosquitoes
Researchers from LSTM, working alongside colleagues from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Cambridge and the Big Data Institute, University of Oxford, have used whole genome sequencing to understand copy-number variants (CNVs) in malaria mosquitoes and their role in insecticide resistance. (2019-07-26)
Ladies' choice: What drives faster, flashier formation of new animal species
Evolution is actually a Sadie Hawkins dance, as new research shows females not only determine whether male animals develop bright colors, but also how fast new species develop. (2019-07-26)
Strange bacteria hint at ancient origin of photosynthesis
Structures inside rare bacteria are similar to those that power photosynthesis in plants today, suggesting the process is older than assumed. (2019-07-25)
Hidden genetic variations power evolutionary leaps
So-called 'cryptic' genetic variation plays an important role in evolution, despite having no immediate effect on the behavior or appearance of the organism. (2019-07-25)
Studies show the influence of environment on the evolution of weeds
Rapid increases in herbicide resistance show that weeds can undergo important genetic changes over very brief periods of time. (2019-07-22)
August's SLAS technology cover article announced
The August edition of SLAS Technology features the cover article, 'Technologies for the Directed Evolution of Cell Therapies,' a review featured in the journal's March 2019 edition. (2019-07-22)
Fossil of smallest old world monkey species discovered in Kenya
Researchers from the National Museums of Kenya, University of Arkansas, University of Missouri and Duke University have announced the discovery of a tiny monkey that lived in Kenya 4.2 million years ago. (2019-07-15)
The path to China's 'ecological civilization' starts with national parks
President Xi Jinping staked out China's role as a committed player to tackle the climate crisis and build an 'ecological civilization.' In a review published July 10 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, researchers discuss one of the Chinese government's efforts -- reforming the management of protected areas by streamlining agencies' responsibilities and reducing functional overlaps. (2019-07-10)
Body plan evolution not as simple as once believed
Hox gene do not work alone to determine the layout of vertebrae, limbs and other body parts. (2019-07-09)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.