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Current Evolution News and Events

Current Evolution News and Events, Evolution News Articles.
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Skin game
Medical University of Vienna professor Leopold Eckhart and colleagues have performed one of the largest comparative genomic studies to help determine the key molecular and evolutionary origins of mammalian adaptations seen in skin proteins. (2018-12-13)
Double the stress slows down evolution
Bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics more slowly if they also have to defend themselves against predators. (2018-12-07)
30 years of experimental evolution results in a new sex chromosome
On Dec. 3, 2018, the laboratory of Professor Axel Meyer, University of Konstanz published new findings of an experimental evolutionary project that ran for 30 years on the genomic mechanisms of sex determination in swordtail fish in the journal Nature Communications. (2018-12-05)
Evolution of the inner ear: Insights from jawless fish
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics (BDR) and collaborators have described for the first time the development of the hagfish inner ear. (2018-12-05)
In death, Lonesome George reveals why giant tortoises live so long
Genetic analysis of DNA from Lonesome George and samples from other giant tortoises of the Galapagos -- which can live more than 100 years in captivity -- found they possessed a number of gene variants linked to DNA repair, immune response, and cancer suppression not possessed by shorter-lived vertebrates. (2018-12-03)
Whales lost their teeth before evolving hair-like baleen in their mouths
Rivaling the evolution of feathers in dinosaurs, one of the most extraordinary transformations in the history of life was the evolution of baleen -- rows of flexible hair-like plates that blue whales, humpbacks and other marine mammals use to filter relatively tiny prey from gulps of ocean water. (2018-11-29)
Great apes and ravens plan without thinking
Planning and self control in animals do not require human-like mental capacities, according to a study from Stockholm University. (2018-11-28)
Elephant-sized triassic creature sheds new light on old theories
The recent discovery of the gargantuan four-legged creature Lisowicia bojani, from the Late Triassic period of Poland, has overturned established beliefs that the only giant herbivores to roam Triassic lands were dinosaurs, report Tomasz Sulej and Grzegorz Nied?wiedzki. (2018-11-22)
The taming of the dog, cow, horse, pig and rabbit
Research at the Earlham Institute into one of the 'genetic orchestra conductors', microRNAs, sheds light on our selectively guided evolution of domestic pets and farmyard animals such as dogs and cows. (2018-11-20)
The common ancestor of species was rod-shaped
There are two major shapes of bacteria, i.e., rod-shape and spherical shape. (2018-11-16)
Salmon are shrinking and it shows in their genes
Male salmon are maturing earlier and becoming smaller, and it shows in their genes. (2018-11-14)
Environmentally-inspired 'niche' features impact species evolution
Tokyo, Japan - Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have shown that the environment-driven evolution of a unique ovipositor in the female fruit fly Drosophila suzukii may have caused coevolution of the male genitalia; new features were found to cause mechanical incompatibility during reproduction with similar species, impeding crossbreeding and isolating the species. (2018-11-10)
Slow death of nearby galaxy
Astronomers from CSIRO and The Australian National University have witnessed, in the finest detail ever, the slow death of a neighbouring dwarf galaxy, which is gradually losing its power to form stars. (2018-11-09)
Loss is more: Today's budding yeasts shed traits from their 400-million-year-old ancestor
Budding yeasts are common in nearly every environment on the planet, perhaps best known for the achievements of a handful of species in the beer, wine, and bread industries or, less attractively, sending people to the drug store to treat infections. (2018-11-08)
UCI scientists simplify and accelerate directed evolution bioengineering method
In a study published today in the journal Cell, University of California, Irvine researchers reported that they have accelerated and simplified directed evolution by having live cells do most of the heavy lifting. (2018-11-08)
The teeth of Changchunsaurus: Rare insight into ornithopod dinosaur tooth evolution
The teeth of Changchunsaurus parvus, a small herbivorous dinosaur from the Cretaceous of China, represent an important and poorly-known stage in the evolution of ornithopod dentition, according to a study released Nov. (2018-11-07)
Bird feathers and shark skin: Explained by the same patterning mechanism
A patterning system that has been shown to play a role in bird feather development is also apparent in the development of sharks' tooth-like skin, new theoretical and experimental evidence finds. (2018-11-07)
Could climate change trigger the return of eradicated mosquito-related disease?
The largest ever study of the mosquito evolutionary tree, going back 195 million years, suggests that present-day climate change could result in the spread and return of dangerous mosquito-borne diseases to new places or areas where they had previously been eradicated, scientists are warning. (2018-11-05)
How cancer-causing papillomaviruses evolved
Cancer-causing human papillomaviruses (HPVs) diverged from their most recent common ancestors approximately half a million years ago, roughly coinciding with the timing of the split between archaic Neanderthals and modern Homo sapiens, according to a study published Nov. (2018-11-01)
Evolution does repeat itself after all: How evolution lets stripes come and go
A team of evolutionary biologists from the University of Konstanz, headed by Professor Dr. (2018-10-25)
The shallow-water cradle of vertebrate evolution
The first vertebrates on Earth originated and diversified in the shallow-water lagoons lining the mid-Paleozoic coastline, a new study finds. (2018-10-25)
Tortoise evolution: How did they become so big?
The evolution of giant tortoise might not be linked to islands, as had been previously thought. (2018-10-23)
Heredity matters: Ancestral protease functions as protein import motor in chloroplasts
Japanese researchers identified a large novel protein complex in the inner chloroplast membrane that functions as a motor to import proteins into the chloroplast. (2018-10-22)
MSU pioneers new course: Digital introduction to biology, evolution
Michigan State University researchers have improved an introductory biology class to make it more accessible for students not majoring in life sciences. (2018-10-19)
Novel switching valve to receive more semen in a sex-role reversed cave insect
The female of a sex-role reversed cave insect species Neotrogla has evolved a switching valve to receive more semen during mating, when a penis-like structure in the female anchors in the male 'vagina.' (2018-10-17)
A curious branch of plankton evolution
Planktonic foraminifera -- tiny, shelled organisms that float in the sea -- left behind one of the most complete fossil records of evolutionary history in deep sea deposits. (2018-10-17)
Local adaption of tuberculosis, not human migration, spread TB resistance mutations
Migration from Europe during the colonial period drove the spread of the dominant strain of tuberculosis seen today, lineage four, a new study reports. (2018-10-17)
Dry conditions in East Africa half a million years ago possibly shaped human evolution, study finds
Samples of ancient sediments from a lake basin in East Africa have revealed that arid conditions developed in the area around half a million years ago, an environmental change that could have played a major role in human evolution and influenced advances in stone technology, according to an international research team that includes geologists from Georgia State University. (2018-10-17)
Population aging and decrease may have socioeconomic and environmental benefits
Environmental scientists argue that societies should embrace population aging and decrease in an opinion appearing Oct. (2018-10-16)
Quantifying evolutionary impacts of humans on the biosphere is harder than it seems
Are human disturbances to the environment driving evolutionary changes in animals and plants? (2018-10-12)
Genetic Achilles heel hurts humans fighting hepatitis C
An antimicrobial signaling molecule called IFN╬╗4 has lower activity against the hepatitis C virus in the vast majority of humans compared with chimpanzees and African hunter-gatherer Pygmies, according to a study published Oct. (2018-10-11)
A pheromone-sensing gene that predates land-dwelling vertebrates
Scientists at Tokyo Tech have discovered a gene that appears to play a vital role in pheromone sensing. (2018-10-09)
HKBU scholar discovers strong evidence for links between drying climate and human evolution
Professor Richard Bernhart Owen of the HKBU Department of Geography has analysed African lake sedimentary cores and established connections between a drying climate and technological and evolutionary changes in early humans. (2018-10-09)
Small-brained female guppies aren't drawn to attractive males
Female guppies with smaller brains can distinguish attractive males, but they don't recognize them as being more appealing or choose to mate with them, according to a new study by UCL and Stockholm University researchers. (2018-10-08)
Dryer, less predictable environment may have spurred human evolution
Evidence of a variable but progressively drying climate coincides with a major shift in stone-tool-making abilities and the appearance of modern Homo sapiens. (2018-10-08)
The threat of Centaurs for the Earth
Astrophysicists from the University of Vienna, in collaboration with Elizabeth A. (2018-10-08)
Viruses influenced gene sharing between Neanderthals and humans
Human evolution used to be depicted as a straight line, gradually progressing from an ape-like ancestor to modern Homo sapiens. (2018-10-04)
Artificial enzymes convert solar energy into hydrogen gas
In a new scientific article, researchers at Uppsala University describe how, using a completely new method, they have synthesised an artificial enzyme that functions in the metabolism of living cells. (2018-10-04)
Could less deadly therapies be a better way to keep cancer in check?
While many cancer therapies initially can be very successful, tumors often return and spread when remaining cancer cells develop resistance to treatment. (2018-10-02)
Neglected baby beetles evolve greater self-reliance
Cambridge zoologists exposed hundreds of burying beetles to two levels of parental care, for 13 generations. (2018-09-28)
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