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Current Evolution News and Events, Evolution News Articles.
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How animals understand numbers influences their chance of survival
While they can't pick out precise numbers, animals can comprehend that more is, well, more. (2020-03-30)
Snake venom evolved for prey not protection
It is estimated that every year, over 100,000 human deaths can be attributed to snakebite from the world's 700 venomous snake species -- all inflicted in self-defence when the snakes feel threatened by encroaching humans. (2020-03-25)
Small horses got smaller, big tapirs got bigger 47 million years ago
The former coalfield of Geiseltal in Saxony-Anhalt has yielded large numbers of exceptionally preserved fossil animals, giving palaeontologists a unique window into the evolution of mammals 47 million years ago. (2020-03-24)
Study: Climatic-niche evolution strikingly similar in plants and animals
Dr. LIU Hui and Dr. YE Qing from the South China Botanical Garden of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with Dr. (2020-03-23)
One of Darwin's evolution theories finally proved by Cambridge researcher
Scientists have proved one of Charles Darwin's theories of evolution for the first time -- nearly 140 years after his death. (2020-03-17)
New study reveals early evolution of cortex
Their researches on the lamprey brain has enabled researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden to push the birth of the cortex back in time by some 300 million years to over 500 million years ago, providing new insights into brain evolution. (2020-03-16)
Study finds gorillas display territorial behavior
Scientists have discovered that gorillas really are territorial -- and their behavior is very similar to our own. (2020-03-12)
A novel biofuel system for hydrogen production from biomass
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has presented a new biofuel system that uses lignin found in biomass for the production of hydrogen. (2020-03-10)
Injection strategies are crucial for geothermal projects
The fear of earthquakes is one of the main reasons for reservations about geothermal energy. (2020-03-10)
Research on soldier ants reveals that evolution can go in reverse
Turtle ant soldiers and their oddly-shaped heads suggest that evolution is not always a one-way street toward increasing specialization. (2020-03-09)
New insights into evolution: Why genes appear to move around
Scientists at Uppsala University have proposed an addition to the theory of evolution that can explain how and why genes move on chromosomes. (2020-03-04)
Re-thinking 'tipping points' in ecosystems and beyond
Abrupt environmental changes, known as regime shifts, are the subject of new research in which shows how small environmental changes trigger slow evolutionary processes that eventually precipitate collapse. (2020-03-02)
Gene loss more important in animal kingdom evolution than previously thought
Scientists have shown that some key points of animal evolution -- like the ones leading to humans or insects -- were associated with a large loss of genes in the genome. (2020-02-27)
Anthropogenic seed dispersal: rethinking the origins of plant domestication
Over the past three millennia, selective breeding has dramatically widened the array of plant domestication traits. (2020-02-27)
Early worm lost lower limbs for tube-dwelling lifestyle
Scientists have discovered the earliest known example of an animal evolving to lose body parts it no longer needed. (2020-02-27)
The discovery of ancient Salmonella
Oldest reconstructed bacterial genomes link agriculture and herding with emergence of new disease. (2020-02-25)
Paleontology: Tiny prehistoric lizard sheds light on reptile evolution
The discovery of a new species of prehistoric reptile from Germany is reported this week in Scientific Reports. (2020-02-20)
A shift in shape boosts energy storage
More efficient photocatalysts could unlock the potential of solar energy. (2020-02-17)
How gliding animals fine-tuned the rules of evolution
Since its inception in 1867, The American Naturalist has maintained its position as one of the world's premier peer-reviewed publications in ecology, evolution, and behavior research. (2020-02-17)
Heat transport property at the lowermost part of the Earth's mantle
Lattice thermal conductivities of MgSiO3 bridgmanite and postperovskite (PPv) phases under the Earth's deepest mantle conditions were determined by quantum mechanical computer simulations. (2020-02-13)
Boom and bust for ancient sea dragons
A new study by scientists from the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences, shows a well-known group of extinct marine reptiles had an early burst in their diversity and evolution - but that a failure to adapt in the long-run may have led to their extinction. (2020-02-13)
Disease found in fossilized dinosaur tail afflicts humans to this day
Researchers at Tel Aviv University have identified a benign tumor found in a fossilized dinosaur tail as part of the pathology of LCH (Langerhans cell histiocytosis), a rare and sometimes painful disease that still afflicts humans, particularly children under the age of 10. (2020-02-11)
Research sheds light on the evolutionary puzzle of coupling
A UTSA researcher has discovered that, whether in a pair or in groups, success in primate social systems may also provide insight into organization of human social life. (2020-02-03)
Butterflies can acquire new scent preferences and pass these on to their offspring
Two studies from the National University of Singapore demonstrate that insects can learn from their previous experiences and adjust their future behaviour for survival and reproduction. (2020-02-03)
How and when spines changed in mammalian evolution
Researchers compared modern and ancient animals to explore how mammalian vertebrae have evolved into sophisticated physical structures that can carry out multiple functions. (2020-02-03)
How the development of skulls and beaks made Darwin's finches one of the most diverse species
Darwin's finches are among the most celebrated examples of adaptive radiation in the evolution of modern vertebrates and now a new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has provided fresh insights into their rapid development and evolutionary success. (2020-02-03)
Immune systems not prepared for climate change
Researchers have for the first time found a connection between the immune systems of different bird species, and the various climatic conditions in which they live. (2020-01-30)
'Profound' evolution: Wasps learn to recognize faces
One wasp species has evolved the ability to recognize individual faces among their peers -- something that most other insects cannot do -- signaling an evolution in how they have learned to work together. (2020-01-27)
Traces of the European enlightenment found in the DNA of western sign languages
Sign languages throughout North and South America and Europe have centuries-long roots in five European locations, a finding that gives new insight into the influence of the European Enlightenment on many of the world's signing communities and the evolution of their languages. (2020-01-22)
New technique to study molecules and materials on quantum simulator discovered
A new technique to study the properties of molecules and materials on a quantum simulator has been discovered. (2020-01-21)
Scientists uncover how an explosion of new genes explain the origin of land plants
Scientists have made a significant discovery about the genetic origins of how plants evolved from living in water to land 470 million years ago. (2020-01-16)
Male songbirds can't survive on good looks alone, says a new study
Brightly colored male songbirds not only have to attract the female's eye, but also make sure their sperm can last the distance, according to new research. (2020-01-15)
What we're learning about the reproductive microbiome
Most research has focused on the oral, skin, and gut microbiomes, but bacteria, viruses, and fungi living within our reproductive systems may also affect sperm quality, fertilization, embryo implantation, and other aspects of conception and reproduction. (2020-01-14)
Global database of all bird species shows how body shape predicts lifestyle
A database of 10,000 bird species shows how measurements of wings, beaks and tails can predict a species' role in an ecosystem. (2020-01-13)
Directed evolution of endogenous genes opens door to rapid agronomic trait improvement
A research team led by Profs. GAO Caixia and LI Jiayang from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have engineered five saturated targeted endogenous mutagenesis editors (STEMEs) and generated de novo mutations to facilitate the directed evolution of plant genes. (2020-01-13)
Stellar heavy metals can trace history of galaxies
Astronomers have cataloged signs of nine heavy metals in the infrared light from supergiant and giant stars. (2020-01-09)
Antibiotic tolerance reduces the ability to prevent resistance under drug combination therapies
Antimicrobial tolerance can promote the evolution of antimicrobial resistance even under combination drug treatments widely used and expected to prevent it from occurring, a new study finds. (2020-01-09)
Ghost worms mostly unchanged since the age of dinosaurs
How can two species look almost exactly the same despite evolving separately for 140 million years? (2020-01-06)
Evolutionary changes in brain potentially make us more prone to anxiety
Neurochemicals such as serotonin and dopamine play crucial roles in cognitive and emotional functions of our brain. (2019-12-22)
Bark beetles control pathogenic fungi
Pathogens can drive the evolution of social behaviour in insects. (2019-12-20)
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