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Current Evolution News and Events

Current Evolution News and Events, Evolution News Articles.
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Dull teeth, long skulls, specialized bites evolved in unrelated plant-eating dinosaurs
Herbivorous dinosaurs evolved many times during the 180 million-year Mesozoic era, and while they didn't all evolve to chew, swallow, and digest their food in the same way, a few specific strategies appeared time and time again. (2019-12-05)
How flowers adapt to their pollinators
The first flowering plants originated more than 140 million years ago in the early Cretaceous. (2019-12-05)
New cretaceous mammal provides evidence for separation of hearing and chewing modules
A joint research team led by MAO Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and MENG Jin from the American Museum of Natural History reported a new symmetrodont, Origolestes lii, a stem therian mammal from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota, in China's Liaoning Province. (2019-12-05)
A window into evolution
The C4 cycle supercharges photosynthesis and evolved independently more than 62 times. (2019-12-03)
Researchers say animal-like embryos preceded animal appearance
Animals evolved from single-celled ancestors before diversifying into 30-40 distinct anatomical designs. (2019-11-27)
New Cretaceous mammal fossil sheds light on evolution of middle ear
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) have reported a new species of multituberculate -- a type of extinct Mesozoic rodent -- with well-preserved middle ear bones from the Cretaceous Jehol Biota of China. (2019-11-27)
Genetic studies reveal how rat lungworm evolves
Rat lungworm is a parasitic disease, spread through contaminated food, which affects the brain and spinal cord. (2019-11-21)
Not so selfish after all--Key role of transposable elements in mammalian evolution
A scientist at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) has revealed a key role for 'selfish' transposable elements in the evolution of the mammary gland, a defining feature of all mammals. (2019-11-20)
An ancient snake's cheekbone sheds light on evolution of modern snake skulls
New research from a collaboration between Argentinian and University of Alberta palaeontologists adds a new piece to the puzzle of snake evolution. (2019-11-20)
New fossils shed light on how snakes got their bite and lost their legs
New fossils of an ancient legged snake, called Najash, shed light on the origin of the slithering reptiles. (2019-11-20)
How do gliomas evolve?
The Glioma Longitudinal Analysis (GLASS) Consortium characterized diffuse glioma cells both before and after therapy to characterize how they change and why this form of malignant brain cancer is so difficult to treat. (2019-11-20)
Researchers find striking variation in mechanisms that drive sex selection in frogs
Researchers from McMaster University have discovered striking variation in the underlying genetic machinery that orchestrates sexual differentiation in frogs, demonstrating that evolution of this crucial biological system has moved at a dramatic pace. (2019-11-19)
Spot the difference: Two identical-looking bird species with very different genes
While reports of species going extinct are sadly becoming common, an international team of scientists has identified a new species of bird living on the Southern coast of China, that diverged from their Northern relatives around half a million years ago. (2019-11-13)
Predicting evolution
A new method of 're-barcoding' DNA allows scientists to track rapid evolution in yeast. (2019-11-13)
Evolution can reconfigure gene networks to deal with environmental change
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have unravelled the genetic mechanisms behind tiny waterfleas' ability to adapt to increased levels of phosphorus pollution in lakes. (2019-11-13)
New catalyst efficiently produces hydrogen from seawater
Seawater is one of the most abundant resources on earth, offering promise both as a source of hydrogen and of drinking water in arid climates. (2019-11-11)
Mammals' complex spines are linked to high metabolisms; we're learning how they evolved
Mammals' backbones are weird. They're much more complex than the spines of other land animals like reptiles. (2019-11-07)
Wild animals evolving to give birth earlier in warming climate
Red deer on a Scottish island are providing scientists with some of the first evidence that wild animals are evolving to give birth earlier in the year as the climate warms. (2019-11-05)
Red deer are evolving to give birth earlier in a warming climate
Red deer living on the Isle of Rum, on the west coast of Scotland, have been giving birth earlier and earlier since the 1980s, at a rate of about three days per decade. (2019-11-05)
DNA exchange among species is major contributor to diversity in Heliconius butterflies
Exchange of genetic material among species played a major role in the wide diversity of Heliconius butterflies, according to a new study, results of which inform a centuries-long debate about the value of hybridization to species evolution. (2019-10-31)
Differences in human and non-human primate saliva may be caused by diet
Humans are known to be genetically similar to our primate relatives. (2019-10-31)
Nature: Scientists present new data on the evolution of plants and the origin of species
There are over 500,000 plant species in the world today. (2019-10-23)
Evolving alongside other bacteria keeps hospital bug potent
Bacteria that evolve in natural environments -- rather than laboratory tests -- may become resistant to phage treatments without losing their virulence, new research shows. (2019-10-23)
Single mutation dramatically changes structure and function of bacteria's transporter proteins
Swapping a single amino acid in a simple bacterial protein changes its structure and function, revealing the effects of complex gene evolution, finds a new study published in the journal eLife. (2019-10-22)
Modern Melanesians harbor beneficial DNA from archaic hominins
Modern Melanesians harbor beneficial genetic variants that they inherited from archaic Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins, according to a new study. (2019-10-17)
The brain does not follow the head
The human brain is about three times the size of the brains of great apes. (2019-10-15)
Chemical evolution -- One-pot wonder
Before life, there was RNA: Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich show how the four different letters of this genetic alphabet could be created from simple precursor molecules on early Earth -- under the same environmental conditions. (2019-10-09)
Influenza evolution patterns change with time, complicating vaccine design
Skoltech scientists discovered new patterns in the evolution of the influenza virus. (2019-10-08)
New research furthers understanding about what shapes human gut microbiome
A new Northwestern University study finds that despite human's close genetic relationship to apes, the human gut microbiome is more similar to that of Old World monkeys like baboons than to that of apes like chimpanzees. (2019-10-07)
Confronting colony collapse
Researchers from the Ecology and Evolution Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) sequenced the genomes of the two Varroa mite species that parasitize the honey bee. (2019-10-03)
Understanding the genomic signature of coevolution
An international team of researchers including limnologists from the University of Konstanz shows that rapid genomic changes during antagonistic species interactions are shaped by the reciprocal effects of ecology and evolution. (2019-10-02)
CRISPR technology reveals secret in monarchs' survival
New research from Cornell University sheds light on the secret to the survival of monarch butterflies by revealing how the species developed immunity to fatal milkweed toxins. (2019-10-02)
250-million-year-old evolutionary remnants seen in muscles of human embryos
A team of evolutionary biologists have demonstrated that some limb muscles known to be present in many mammals but absent in the adult human are actually formed during early human development and then lost prior to birth. (2019-10-01)
Why are there no animals with three legs?
If 'Why?' is the first question in science, 'Why not?' must be a close second. (2019-10-01)
How fungus-farming ants could help solve our antibiotic resistance problem
For the last 60 million years, fungus-growing ants have farmed fungi for food. (2019-09-26)
Catching evolution in the act
Researchers have produced some of the first evidence that shows that artificial selection and natural selection act on the same genes, a hypothesis predicted by Charles Darwin in 1859. (2019-09-26)
Evolution experiment: Specific immune response of beetles adapts to bacteria
The memory of the immune system is able to distinguish a foreign protein with which the organism has already come into contact from another and to react with a corresponding antibody. (2019-09-24)
Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence
Researchers at Michigan State University say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but their new paper published in The American Naturalist explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same way as natural organisms did -- with implications for many fields, including artificial intelligence. (2019-09-20)
Guppies teach us why evolution happens
New study on guppies shows that animals evolve in response the the environment they create in the absence of predators, rather than in response to the risk of being eaten. (2019-09-18)
'Game-changing' research could solve evolution mysteries
An evolution revolution has begun after scientists extracted genetic information from a 1.7-million-year-old rhino tooth -- the largest and oldest genetic data to ever be recorded. (2019-09-11)
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