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Current Eye disease News and Events

Current Eye disease News and Events, Eye disease News Articles.
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Using infrared eye tracking to study infant behavior
Researchers have adapted infrared technology to automate the tracking of visual tasks in infants in order to more accurately measure memory and cognitive behavior. (2020-08-14)
Artificial intelligence recognizes deteriorating photoreceptors
A software based on artificial intelligence (AI), which was developed by researchers at the Eye Clinic of the University Hospital Bonn, Stanford University and University of Utah, enables the precise assessment of the progression of geographic atrophy (GA), a disease of the light sensitive retina caused by age-related macular degeneration (AMD). (2020-08-13)
Human milk based fortifiers improve health outcomes for the smallest premature babies
More than 380,000 babies are born prematurely in the United States each year, according to the March of Dimes. (2020-08-12)
Young nearsighted kids benefit from bifocal contact lenses, study shows
Bifocal contact lenses aren't just for aging eyes anymore. In nearsighted kids as young as 7 years old, multifocal contact lenses with a heavy dose of added reading power can dramatically slow further progression of myopia, new research has found. (2020-08-11)
Multifocal contact lenses slow myopia progression in children
Children wearing multifocal contact lenses had slower progression of their myopia, according to results from a clinical trial funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health. (2020-08-11)
Researchers discover predictor of laser treatment success in patients with glaucoma
More than 70 million people worldwide suffer from glaucoma. Treatment options have traditionally included eye drops to reduce the fluid the eye produces or surgery to unclog the eye's drainage. (2020-08-05)
NASA finds an eye and a giant 'tail' in Typhoon Hagupit
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of Typhoon Hagupit in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean that showed the development of an eye as it quickly intensified. (2020-08-03)
An averted glance gives a glimpse of the mind behind the eyes
Shakespeare once wrote that the ''eyes are the window to your soul.'' But scientists have found it challenging to peer into the brain to see how it derives meaning from a look into another's eyes. (2020-08-03)
Eye-tracking tech helps aged care assessment
Memory loss among older Australians is on the rise as the Baby Boomer generation enters retirement - but a new technique tested by Flinders University researchers that investigates cognitive skills through eye-tracking technology may be used to help incorporate all older people's preferences into aged care policy and practice. (2020-08-03)
Look into the mirror
If the eyes are the mirror of the soul, then thanks to the translucent corneas, we can look deep into that soul. (2020-07-24)
Researchers capture cell-level details of curved cornea
Researchers have, for the first time, acquired optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the curved layers of a person's cornea with cell-level detail and a large viewing area. (2020-07-23)
Dual role discovered for molecule involved in autoimmune eye disease
The inflammatory molecule interleukin-17A (IL-17A) triggers immune cells that in turn reduce IL-17A's pro-inflammatory activity, according to a study by National Eye Institute (NEI) researchers. (2020-07-23)
NASA sees compact Douglas strengthening to a major hurricane
Although a compact storm, hurricane Douglas in the Eastern Pacific is mighty, as it has become the season's first major hurricane. (2020-07-23)
World's smallest imaging device has heart disease in focus
A team of researchers led by the University of Adelaide and University of Stuttgart has used 3D micro-printing to develop the world's smallest, flexible scope for looking inside blood vessels. (2020-07-21)
Study points to potential new approach to treating glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have shown for the first time that when one optic nerve in the eye is damaged, as in glaucoma, the opposite optic nerve comes to the rescue by sharing its metabolic energy. (2020-07-21)
School-based vision screening programs found 1 in 10 kids had vision problems
A school-based vision screening program in kindergarten, shown to be effective at identifying untreated vision problems in 1 in 10 students, could be useful to implement widely in diverse communities, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191085. (2020-07-20)
Insight into toddlers' awareness of their own uncertainty
Toddlers may not be able to describe their feelings of uncertainty, but a new study from the Center for Mind and Brain at UC Davis provides evidence that toddlers may experience and deal with uncertainty in decision making in the same way as older children and adults. (2020-07-20)
Glaucoma study findings emphasise need for regular eye checks
People with early-stage glaucoma see the contrast of visible objects in a very similar way to people without the condition, a new study has shown. (2020-07-17)
Study finds that special filters in glasses can help the color blind see colors better
A new UC Davis Eye Center study, conducted in collaboration with France's INSERM Stem Cell and Brain Research Institute, found that special patented glasses engineered with technically advanced spectral notch filters enhance color vision for those with the most common types of red-green color vision deficiency ('anomalous trichromacy'). (2020-07-13)
Scientists use nanoparticle-delivered gene therapy to inhibit blinding eye disease in rodents
In experiments in rats and mice, two Johns Hopkins scientists -- an engineer and an ophthalmologist -- report the successful use of nanoparticles to deliver gene therapy for blinding eye disease. (2020-07-07)
Scientists discover a new connection between the eyes and touch
Tiny eye movements can be used as an index of humans' ability to anticipate relevant information in the environment independent of the information's sensory modality. (2020-07-06)
New eye drops may prevent a common cause of blindness
New eye drops could prevent vision loss after retinal vein occlusion, a major cause of blindness for millions of adults, a study by Columbia University researchers has found. (2020-06-29)
Towards an AI diagnosis like the doctor's
Artificial intelligence is an important innovation in diagnostics, because it can learn to recognize abnormalities that a doctor would also label as a disease. (2020-06-24)
Satellites have drastically changed how we forecast hurricanes
The powerful hurricane that struck Galveston, Texas on September 8, 1900, killing an estimated 8,000 people and destroying more than 3,600 buildings, took the coastal city by surprise. (2020-06-22)
UAlberta clinician-scientists identify pink eye as possible primary symptom of COVID-19
A case of pink eye is now reason to be tested for COVID-19, according to University of Alberta researchers. (2020-06-18)
Seeing corneal degeneration in a new light
The molecular changes that lead to Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) occur decades before the disease causes blurry vision and other noticeable symptoms in patients, new research by UT Southwestern scientists shows. (2020-06-17)
The mystery of visual stability
We move our eyes several times per second. These fast eye movements, called saccades, create large image shifts on the retina -- making our visual system work hard to maintain a stable perceptual world. (2020-06-11)
Scientists rescue mini retinas from eye disease via new gene therapy approach
Scientists have developed a new gene therapy approach that offers tremendous promise for one day treating an eye disease that leads to blindness and affects thousands of people across the globe. (2020-06-11)
Researchers model human stem cells to identify degeneration in glaucoma
More than 3 million Americans have glaucoma, a serious eye condition causing vision loss. (2020-06-11)
A vitamin A analog may help treat diabetic retinopathy
Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among the working-age population. (2020-06-11)
HKUST scientists develop world's first spherical artificial eye with 3D retina
An international team led by HKUST scientists has developed the world's first 3D artificial eye with capabilities better than existing bionic eyes and in some cases, even exceed those of the human eyes, bringing vision to humanoid robots and new hope to patients with visual impairment. (2020-06-10)
Eye scanner detects molecular aging in humans
People often say that eyes are windows to the soul. (2020-06-09)
Gene found that causes eyes to wither in cavefish
In a new study led by University of Maryland researchers, scientists discovered a gene that prevents blood flow to blind cavefish eyes during development. (2020-06-02)
'Single pixel' vision in fish helps scientists understand how humans can spot tiny details
Recently discovered 'single-pixel vision' in fish could help researchers understand how humans are able to spot tiny details in their environment -- like stars in the sky. (2020-05-29)
Avalanche photodiode from UVA and UT-Austin breaks performance record for LiDAR receivers
Electrical and computer engineers at the University of Virginia and University of Texas-Austin have developed an avalanche photodiode that achieved record performance and has the potential to transform next generation night-vision imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) receivers. (2020-05-27)
Eye injury sets immune cells on surveillance to protect the lens
The discovery further challenges the accepted scientific dogma that the lens is shut out from the immune protection. (2020-05-26)
Inexpensive retinal diagnostics via smartphone
Retinal damage due to diabetes is now considered the most common cause of blindness in working-age adults. (2020-05-25)
Cutting edge two-photon microscopy system breaks new grounds in retinal imaging
In a recent breakthrough, a team of HKUST scientists developed an adaptive optics two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy using direct wavefront sensing for high-resolution in vivo fluorescence imaging of mouse retina, which allow in vivo fundus imaging at an unprecedented resolution after full AO correction. (2020-05-20)
Noninvasive brain stimulation with ultrasonic waves controls monkeys' choices
Noninvasive pulses of ultrasound waves aimed at specific regions in the brains of macaque monkeys can give some control over the monkeys' choices, scientists report. (2020-05-20)
NASA-NOAA satellite sees Amphan's eye obscured
Early on May 18, 2020, Tropical Cyclone Amphan was a Category 5 storm in the Northern Indian Ocean. (2020-05-19)
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