Current Facial features News and Events

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The tree of cortical cell types describes the diversity of neurons in the brain
The tree of cortical cell types provides one of the most detailed and complete characterizations of the diversity of neural types in the brain so far. (2020-12-02)

Children with dyslexia show stronger emotional responses
Children diagnosed with dyslexia show greater emotional reactivity than children without dyslexia, according to a new collaborative study by UC San Francisco neuroscientists with the UCSF Dyslexia Center and UCSF Memory and Aging Center. (2020-12-01)

A dessert-like desert: Californian lithosphere resembles crème brûlée
A model for the southeastern California lithosphere suggests that a strong upper crust overlies weaker lower rock layers. (2020-11-30)

Men tuning into Insta-spiration
New research confirms men are affected by Instagram influencers who set global benchmarks for ideal body shape, fashion and even facial trends. While perhaps not as focused on 'thinness' as women appear to be from female influencers, the Flinders University study confirms males are responding to the body image and fitness messages shared by Instagram leaders, some with millions of followers. (2020-11-29)

BICRA gene provides answers to patients, doctors and scientists
Researchers identified the BICRA gene as a new disease gene involved in a neurodevelopmental disorder and found evidence that BICRA functions in neural development in humans and flies. (2020-11-23)

Field geology at Mars' equator points to ancient megaflood
Floods of unimaginable magnitude once washed through Gale Crater on Mars' equator around 4 billion years ago - a finding that hints at the possibility that life may have existed there, according to data collected by NASA's Curiosity rover and analyzed in joint project by scientists from Jackson State University, Cornell University, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of Hawaii. (2020-11-20)

Can eating mangoes reduce women's facial wrinkles?
A new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis, finds eating Ataulfo mangoes, also known as honey or Champagne mangoes, may reduce facial wrinkles in older women with fairer skin. But too much mango may increase wrinkles. (2020-11-19)

Can facial recognition help identify congenital adrenal hyperplasia?
Investigators train computers to recognize facial features, showing promise for identifying congenital adrenal hyperplasia, a rare hormone disorder. (2020-11-18)

Computer vision predicts congenital adrenal hyperplasia
Using computer vision, researchers have discovered strong correlations between facial morphology and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a life-threatening genetic condition of the adrenal glands and one of the most common forms of adrenal insufficiency in children. The findings could have implications for phenotyping and treating patients with CAH. (2020-11-18)

Small differences, big impact
In a new study, researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have identified a handful of variations in an amino acid sequence critical for retaining the ancestral function of a gene over the course of 600 million years of evolution. (2020-11-17)

Is zoom increasing the demand for plastic surgery
Patients are seeking plastic surgery in record numbers, citing their appearance on Zoom as a cause. Of particular concern are noses and wrinkles. (2020-11-13)

Elastic-free face masks can help some with allergies stay safe during COVID-19
A University of Cincinnati fellow presents a COVID-19 related case study during the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) scientific meeting held November 13-15. (2020-11-13)

Invisible organic light-emitting diodes reach new world record
You can't see it with the naked eye, but a new fluorescent organic light-emitting diode (OLED) could shed light on the development of innovative applications in devices such as smartphone and television displays using near-infrared light. Created through the combined work of engineers from Polytechnique Montréal and chemists from Université de Montréal, this fluorescent OLED is 300% more efficient than existing OLEDs in its category. The research team published today details in the journal Advanced Functional Materials. (2020-11-11)

Empathy and perspective taking: How social skills are built
Being able to feel empathy and to take in the other person's perspective are two abilities through which we understand what is going on in the other's mind. But it is still unclear what exactly they constitute. The Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences has now developed a model which explains what empathy and perspective taking are made of: It is not one specific competence rather than many individual factors that vary according to the situation. (2020-11-10)

Get on the grid: 'Micro-doses' of Botox provide up-close improvement of facial skin
Botulinum toxin - best known by the brand name Botox - is a popular treatment to reduce facial lines and wrinkles. Over the years, plastic surgeons have explored alternative approaches to maximize effectiveness while minimizing side effects of botulinum toxin injection, including smaller doses and more-diluted concentrations. (2020-11-06)

Facing up to the reality of politicians' Instagram posts
A University of Georgia researcher used computer vision to analyze thousands of images from over 100 Instagram accounts of United States politicians and discovered posts that showed politicians' faces in nonpolitical settings increased audience engagement over traditional posts such as politicians in professional or political settings. (2020-10-29)

Cleveland Clinic-led research team identifies differences between benign and pathogenic variants
An international team of researchers led by Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute has performed for the first time a wide-scale characterization of missense variants from 1,330 disease-associated genes. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study identifies features associated with pathogenic and benign variants that reveal the effects of the mutations at a molecular level. (2020-10-27)

A wearable sensor to help ALS patients communicate
MIT researchers have designed a skin-like device that can be attached to the face and measure small movements such as a twitch or a smile. With this approach, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) could communicate a variety of sentiments with small movements that are measured and interpreted by the device. (2020-10-22)

Comparing canine brains using 3D-endocast modelling
Based on digital endocranial cast models the canine brain does not increase proportionally with body size. Researchers at ELTE Eötvös Loránd and Kaposvár University in Hungary reconstructed the surface morphology of 28 canine brains, including various dog breeds, wolves, coyotes, and jackals. The shortening of the facial skeleton greatly influences the ratio of certain brain regions, primarily the olfactory bulb and the frontal lobe. These changes might have profound implications for olfactory and problem-solving abilities. (2020-10-22)

New tool can diagnose strokes with a smartphone
A new tool created by researchers at Penn State and Houston Methodist Hospital could diagnose a stroke based on abnormalities in a patient's speech ability and facial muscular movements, and with the accuracy of an emergency room physician -- all within minutes from an interaction with a smartphone. (2020-10-22)

Nonverbal doctor-patient rapport relieved pain during acupuncture treatment
When 22 acupuncture clinicians and 23 patients seeking pain relief mirrored each other's facial expressions during acupuncture treatment, patients experienced less pain, according to a new study. Additionally, brain activity involved in representing the mental state of others, which is key for empathy and compassion, became more aligned after the doctor and (2020-10-21)

Dual brain imaging provides insight into neural basis of patient-clinician relationship
Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital have reported on an experiment using a novel magnetic resonance imaging-based approach to track the effects of different behaviors on the brain while patients and clinicians interact with one another. Their research, published in Science Advances, suggests that mirroring in both facial expressions and brain activity can affect the patient-clinician bond and treatment. In this case, the patients were receiving treatment for pain from an acupuncturist. (2020-10-21)

Monkey study suggests that they, like humans, may have 'self-domesticated'
Asif Ghazanfar led a team of scientists who determined that changing an infant monkey's verbal development also changed a physical marker of domesticity: a patch of white fur on its forehead. This is the first study linking the degree of a social trait with the size of a physical sign of domestication, in any species. (2020-10-15)

Machine learning predicts how long museum visitors will engage with exhibits
In a proof-of-concept study, education and artificial intelligence researchers have demonstrated the use of a machine-learning model to predict how long individual museum visitors will engage with a given exhibit. The finding opens the door to a host of new work on improving user engagement with informal learning tools. (2020-10-13)

Studying the sun as a star to understand stellar flares and exoplanets
New research shows that sunspots and other active regions can change the overall solar emissions. The sunspots cause some emissions to dim and others to brighten; the timing of the changes also varies between different types of emissions. This knowledge will help astronomers characterize the conditions of stars, which has important implications for finding exoplanets around those stars. (2020-10-12)

Earphone tracks facial expressions, even with a face mask
Cornell University researchers have invented an earphone that can continuously track full facial expressions by observing the contour of the cheeks - and can then translate expressions into emojis or silent speech commands. (2020-10-12)

Minimizing the movement problem in single-particle cryo-EM
While single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has enabled access to structures of proteins that were previously intractable and, most recently, has done much to inform our understanding of SARS-CoV-2 structure, the technique still has some weaknesses. (2020-10-08)

Harnessing big data and artificial intelligence to predict future pandemic spread
During COVID-19, artificial intelligence (AI) has been used to enhance diagnostic efforts, deliver medical supplies and even assess risk factors from blood tests. Now, artificial intelligence is being used to forecast future COVID-19 cases. (2020-09-29)

3D biometric authentication based on finger veins almost impossible to fool
Biometric authentication, which uses unique anatomical features such as fingerprints or facial features to verify a person's identity, is increasingly replacing traditional passwords for accessing everything from smartphones to law enforcement systems. (2020-09-28)

Talc and petroleum jelly among the best lubricants for people wearing PPE
Talcum powder, a coconut oil-cocoa butter beeswax mixture, and petroleum jelly provide the best skin protection for long-term PPE use, say scientists. (2020-09-24)

When painting reveals increases in social trust
Scientists from the CNRS, ENS-PSL, Inserm, and Sciences Po revealed an increase in facial displays of trustworthiness in European painting between the fourteenth and twenty-first centuries. The findings, published in Nature Communications on 22 September 2020, were obtained by applying face-processing software to two groups of portraits, suggesting an increase in trustworthiness in society that closely follows rising living standards over the course of this period. (2020-09-22)

Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
The study published in eLife analyzed behaviors associated with oxytocin, one of the known ''happy hormones'', and showed that these can be reverted in the individual, with or without oxytocin, depending on the social group it interacts with. (2020-09-22)

Mount Sinai researchers develop COVID-19 mortality prediction model
Using the largest development dataset yet (n=3841), and a systematic machine learning framework, Mount Sinai researchers developed a COVID-19 mortality prediction model that showed high accuracy (AUC=0·91) when applied to test datasets of retrospective (n=961) and prospective (n=249) patients. This model was based on three clinical features: patient's age, minimum oxygen saturation over the course of their medical encounter, and type of patient encounter (inpatient vs outpatient and telehealth visits). (2020-09-22)

Personal protective respirator masks (PPE) often do not fit correctly, especially for women and Asian healthcare workers
The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has put the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), including face masks, under the global spotlight. However a paper published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) reveals that masks do not always fit correctly and hospitals can lack the time and financial resources to ensure every healthcare worker has a mask that fits correctly. (2020-09-15)

New study explores if flirting is real and shows it can work
A new paper by researchers based at the University of Kansas has been published in the Journal of Sex Research examining if flirting has a particular facial cue effectively used by women to indicate interest in a man. (2020-09-14)

Botox for TMJ disorders may not lead to bone loss in the short term, but more research is needed
Botox injections to manage jaw and facial pain do not result in clinically significant changes in jaw bone when used short term and in low doses, according to researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. However, they found evidence of bone loss when higher doses were used. (2020-09-14)

Cool eyes on fever screening: Optimizing infrared thermography
A report published in the Journal of Biomedical Optics provides insights for optimizing infrared thermograph-based fever screening. Thermography using infrared thermographs (IRTs), enables increased options for temperature estimation with greater accuracy. Although the use of thermography as a stand-alone detection method for COVID-19 is unlikely to prevent spread, emerging evidence and international consensus suggest that it is indeed possible to use IRTs effectively for detecting elevated body temperatures. (2020-09-14)

Drone survey reveals large earthwork at ancestral Wichita site in Kansas
A Dartmouth-led study using multisensor drones has revealed a large circular earthwork at what may be Etzanoa, an archaeological site near Wichita, Kansas. Archaeologists speculate that the site was visited by a Spanish expedition, led by Juan de Oñate, a controversial conquistador, in 1601. The earthwork may be the remains of a so-called ''council circle,'' as it is similar to several other circular earthworks in the region, according to the study's findings published in American Antiquity. (2020-09-03)

First 3D look at an embryonic sauropod dinosaur reveals unexpected facial features
About 25 years ago, researchers discovered the first dinosaur embryos in an enormous nesting ground of titanosaurian dinosaurs. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on August 27 describe the first near-intact embryonic skull. The finding adds to our understanding of the development of sauropod dinosaurs, like the long-necked Brontosaurus, and suggests that they may have had specialized facial features as hatchlings that changed as they grew into adults. (2020-08-27)

Social media information can predict a wide range of personality traits and attributes
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology report the use of machine learning to analyze behavior on Twitter and predict a wide range of personality traits and attributes such as intelligence and extraversion. Specifically, the study uses component-wise gradient boosting to demonstrate that network features, such as the number of Tweets and the number of likes, and word usage on Twitter are predictive of social (e.g., extraversion) and mental health (e.g., anxiety) personalities, respectively. (2020-08-24)

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