Current Family meals News and Events

Current Family meals News and Events, Family meals News Articles.
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Some parents prioritize Thanksgiving traditions over reducing COVID-19 risks
One in three parents say the benefits of gathering with family for the holidays are worth the risk of spreading or getting the virus, according to the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at Michigan Medicine. (2020-11-23)

Do meal kits tick right boxes?
During the pandemic, handy meal kit delivery services are helping to develop home cooking habits incorporating healthy ingredients such as vegetables, and a balance of less harmful fats and salt. However, it's important to understand the qualities of these recipes, which vary from week to week, before deciding whether the meal kit is a suitable service for you and your family's nutritional needs and preferences,'' Australian nutrition and dietetics researchers say in a paper in Health Promotion International. (2020-11-19)

Greater mosquito susceptibility to Zika virus fueled the epidemic
By experimentally comparing wild populations of Ae. aegypti the researchers discovered that the invasive subspecies is very effective at transmitting the Zika virus not only because it has more frequent contacts with humans for blood meals, but also as a result of its greater susceptibility to the virus relative to the African subspecies. (2020-11-19)

'Domestication' increases mosquito's zika virus susceptibility
The Aedes aegypti aegypti subspecies of mosquito, which has become a ''domestic'' pest worldwide, can acquire and transmit Zika virus more easily than its African forerunner. (2020-11-19)

UCF researcher examines benefits of supportive communities for older adults
To find out just how well the aging-in-community strategy is working, a University of Central Florida health management and informatics researcher examined three aging-in-community programs in Florida. Her study, which is among the first to examine some key variables for these programs, was recently published in the journal Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine. (2020-11-17)

How to ensure patients manage their chronic kidney disease
A Singapore study finds patients with chronic kidney disease need tailored nutrition guidance, as well as better communication with doctors and family support, to empower them to manage their condition. (2020-11-13)

Efforts needed to better integrate family caregivers into health care teams
An estimated 53 million family members and friends provide care assistance to loved ones in the United States, yet family caregivers face significant barriers coordinating their efforts with the formal health care team. A new study suggests changes the health care system can make to better integrate family members into the health care team. (2020-11-10)

Representation of female authors in family medicine academic journals is trending upward
After decades of underrepresentation in medicine, women are now entering many specialties in the United States, including family medicine, at higher rates than men. Despite the rising proportion of female physicians in family medicine, they continue to be underrepresented in the highest levels of professional attainment, particularly in academic settings. This study from the Robert Graham Center examines female authorship of research published in three leading U.S. family medicine journals over time. (2020-11-10)

Calories by the clock? Squeezing most of your calories in early doesn't impact weight loss
Time-restricted eating, which restricts eating to specific hours of the day, did not impact weight among overweight adults with prediabetes or diabetes. Adults in the 12-week study ate the same healthy, pre-prepared foods, however, one group ate the bulk of their calories before 1 p.m. each day, versus the other group that ate 50% of their calories after 5 p.m. (2020-11-09)

New UTSA research identifies link between food insecurity and unengaged distance learning
A new study by the UTSA Urban Education Institute found that 26% of local students and parents surveyed said they were experiencing food insecurity, meaning food ran out and they didn't have more. The research during pandemic distance learning indicated that food insecure students were less motivated and engaged in schoolwork compared to their peers, signifying how hunger and larger issues of family instability can harm student growth. (2020-11-02)

People with type 2 diabetes need not avoid eating potatoes based on glycemic index
People with type 2 Diabetes (T2D) are frequently told to avoid eating potatoes, and other high Glycemic Index (GI) foods, because of the longstanding perception that these foods make it difficult to control blood sugar levels. However, for the first time, a rigorously controlled clinical trial, including 24 adults with T2D, demonstrates that GI is not an accurate surrogate for an individual's glycemic response (GR) to a food consumed as part of an evening meal. (2020-10-26)

Shared religious experiences bring couples together
Couples that pray together stay together. It's a common religious saying, but a new study from the University of Georgia is giving the proverb some scientific credence. (2020-10-22)

NUS study reveals severe air pollution drives food delivery consumption and plastic waste
When the air outside is bad, office workers are more likely to order food delivery than go out for lunch, which in turn increases plastic waste from food packaging, according to a study by researchers from the National University of Singapore. (2020-10-19)

Therapy plus medication better than medication alone in bipolar disorder
A review of 39 randomized clinical trials by scientists from UCLA and their colleagues from other institutions has found that combining the use medication with psychoeducational therapy is more effective at preventing a recurrence of illness in people with bipolar disorder than medication alone. (2020-10-14)

Kegels: Underused by women to treat and prevent urinary incontinence
Kegels are underused to treat and prevent urinary incontinence, especially during pregnancy and the postpartum period. This woman-controlled, non-invasive muscle exercise should be taught and the use of Kegels encouraged by providers (2020-10-13)

Foreign election interference: A global response
The increasing threat of foreign interference in elections has driven six nations to take similar approaches to combat this pervasive threat. A review of the details to their responses brings out valuable differences and insights. (2020-10-13)

Mosquitoes' taste for blood traced to four types of neurons
The female mosquito has an amazing ability to detect blood using her syringe-like ''tongue.'' Now scientists have identified the neurons that give her blood-seeking powers. (2020-10-12)

USC study underscores the gut-brain connection, shows hunger hormone impacts memory
Rats that lacked the hormone ghrelin tended to eat more frequently and gained more weight. They also showed signs that they could not remember when they had last eaten. (2020-10-12)

Welsh-medium school pupils underperform in tests despite more advantaged backgrounds
Secondary schools in Wales that teach pupils through the medium of Welsh are outperformed by their English-speaking counterparts in maths, reading and science tests, according to a new study by Lancaster University. The average results of pupils attending Welsh-language secondary schools are markedly lower than pupils in English-language schools - despite Welsh-medium school pupils having more books available at home, spending more time on their studies outside of school and fewer qualifying for free school meals. (2020-09-29)

ASU study finds association between screen time use, diet and other health factors
In a study recently published in BMC Public Health, Arizona State University researchers found that heavy users of screens -- defined as those who use screens an average of 17.5 hours per day -- reported the least healthful dietary patterns and the poorest health-related characteristics compared with moderate and light users, who averaged roughly 11.3 and 7 hours of screen use per day, respectively. (2020-09-28)

Reusing tableware can reduce waste from online food deliveries
In China, approximately 10 billion online food orders were served to over 400 million customers in 2018. All of these orders came in single-use plastic packaging, with single-use plastic tableware. Together with colleagues from China and the UK, Yuli Shan, an environmental scientist at the University of Groningen, found that reusable tableware can substantially reduce packaging waste and life cycle environmental emissions. The analysis was published in the journal Nature Food on 15 September. (2020-09-25)

Sweet success: Heavy consumption of sugary beverages declined in the US from 2003 to 2016
According to a new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, the percentage of heavy sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumers - those who drink more than 500 calories of SSBs daily - trended downwards in the United States between 2003 and 2016. (2020-09-24)

Feeding indoor cats just once a day could improve health
New University of Guelph research has found that feeding cats one large meal a day may help control hunger better than feeding them several times a day. (2020-09-23)

More than a billion school meals not served during pandemic: Study
A new study estimates that more than 1.15 billion breakfasts and lunches for low-income children were not served in school as a result of school closures between March 9 and May 1. States and school districts have developed innovative solutions to meet the nutritional needs of low-income children and respond to the rapidly growing food insecurity crisis, yet the number of replacement meals is likely far short of what they provided prior to the pandemic. (2020-09-18)

Gene therapy corrects the cardiac effects of Friedreich's ataxia
Gene therapy was successfully used to overcome the cardiac effects of Freidreich's ataxia (FA) in a mouse model of the disease (2020-09-18)

The key to happiness: Friends or family?
Think spending time with your kids and spouse is the key to your happiness? You may actually be happier getting together with your friends, a new SMU study finds. (2020-09-17)

Algorithm boosts efficiency, nutrition for food bank ops
Cornell University systems engineers examined data from a busy New York state food bank and, using a new algorithm, found ways to better allocate food and elevate nutrition in the process. (2020-09-17)

Devi mangiare! Why culture may be contributing to disordered eating among women
'You have to eat!' It's a sentiment that illustrates how central food is to Italian culture, but the woman who uttered these words also happens to be struggling with bulimia nervosa. (2020-09-16)

Point-of-care biomarker assay for traumatic brain injury
Intracranial abnormalities on CT scan in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be predicted by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels in the blood. (2020-09-16)

A novel approach to childhood obesity prevention
A novel taxonomic approach to obesity prevention using existing U.S. obesity prevention (2020-09-16)

The public charge rule: What physicians can do to support immigrant health
Physicians from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine summarize current knowledge on the public benefits included in the 'public charge' rule and offer suggestions for family physicians to support the health of their immigrant patients and families. The authors conclude that 'family physicians can effectively respond to patient and immigrant community concerns about these changes by providing outreach education, access to primary health care, and referrals to legal and social services.' (2020-09-15)

Pesco-Mediterranean diet, intermittent fasting may lower heart disease risk
A Pesco-Mediterranean diet rich in plants, nuts, whole grains, extra-virgin olive oil, and fish and/or seafood is ideal for optimizing cardiovascular health, according to a cumulative review published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Intermittent fasting is recommended as part of this diet. (2020-09-14)

To recreate ancient recipes, check out the vestiges of clay pots
UC Berkeley archaeologists have discovered that unglazed ceramic cookware can retain the residue of not just the last supper cooked, but earlier meals as well, opening a window onto gastronomic practices possibly going back millennia. (2020-09-11)

Firearm ownership among LGBT adults
Nearly 16% of LGBT adults in California own a gun or live in a household with a gun (2020-09-08)

COVID-19 and the threat to American voting rights
The COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated three main pathologies of American voting rights. The pandemic has revealed the lack of systematic and uniform protection of voting rights in the United States. (2020-09-02)

Toxicity of dorsal root ganglia is widely associated with CNS AAV gene therapy
A meta-analysis of non-human primate (NHP) studies showed that adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy often caused dorsal root ganglion (DRG) pathology. There were no clinical effects. (2020-09-02)

Familial incarceration negatively impacts mental health for African American women
More than half of all African American women in the United States report having at least one family member who is incarcerated, causing higher levels of depressive symptoms and psychological distress than previously understood. (2020-09-02)

Study examines the heart risks and benefits of today's most popular fad diets
In a review of existing scientific studies on trendy ketogenic and intermittent fasting diets, researchers at National Jewish Health concluded these diets do seem to help people lose weight in the short-term, and modest evidence suggests they may contribute to cardiovascular health. However, these diets also allow consumption of foods that are known to increase cardiovascular risk and are unlikely to be as effective at preventing heart disease as well-established nutritional guidelines recommended by experts. (2020-08-31)

Archaeology: Ceramic cooking pots record history of ancient food practices
Analysing three components of ceramic cooking pots -- charred remains, inner surface residues and lipids absorbed within the ceramic walls -- may help archaeologists uncover detailed timelines of culinary cooking practices used by ancient civilizations. The findings, from a year-long cooking experiment, are published this week in Scientific Reports. (2020-08-27)

Research finds people who eat pasta have better overall quality diets than those who don't
Good news for pasta eaters! New research published in Frontiers in Nutrition this month, analyzing the diets of adults and children who eat pasta, has revealed good news about one of America's favorite foods. The research found that pasta consumption in both children and adults is associated with a better diet quality and better nutrient intakes than that of those adults and children who do not eat pasta. Furthermore, In adult women, pasta-eaters showed a beneficial weight-related outcome. (2020-08-26)

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