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Artificial intelligence and farmer knowledge boost smallholder maize yields
To better deal with climate stress, farmers in Colombia's maize-growing region of Córdoba needed information services that would help them decide what varieties to plant, when they should sow and how they should manage their crops. (2019-10-15)
No soil left behind: How a cost-effective technology can enrich poor fields
Many farmers across sub-Saharan Africa try to coax crops out of sandy soils that are not ideal for holding water and nutrients. (2019-10-09)
The benefits of updating agricultural drainage infrastructure
The massive underground infrastructure that allows farmers to cultivate crops on much of the world's most productive land has outlived its design life and should be updated, according to a new study. (2019-10-07)
UMD CONSERVE Center leading effort to advance water and food security
We're running out of water to grow food and the UMD CONSERVE Center of Excellence is leading the effort to develop and adopt solutions. (2019-09-26)
Tractor overturn prediction using a bouncing ball model could save the lives of farmers
Overturning tractors are the leading cause of death for farmers around the world. (2019-09-25)
New AI app predicts climate change stress for farmers in Africa
A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool available for free in a smartphone app can predict near-term crop productivity for farmers in Africa and may help them protect their staple crops -- such as maize, cassava and beans -- in the face of climate warming, according to Penn State researchers. (2019-09-23)
Sesame yields stable in drought conditions
Research shows adding sesame to cotton-sorghum crop rotations is possible in west Texas (2019-09-18)
Study finds human hearts evolved for endurance
Major physical changes occurred in the human heart as people shifted from hunting and foraging to farming and modern life. (2019-09-16)
Hiding in plain sight
Early rice growers unwittingly gave barnyard grass a big hand, helping to give root to a rice imitator that is now considered one of the world's worst agricultural weeds. (2019-09-16)
Breeders release new flaxseed cultivar with higher yield
The crop has many uses as plant-based food and fiber. (2019-09-11)
Advanced breeding paves the way for disease-resistant beans
ETH researchers are involved in the development and implementation of a method to efficiently breed for disease-resistant beans in different regions of the world. (2019-09-11)
Researchers find earliest evidence of milk consumption
A research team, led by archaeologists at the University of York, have identified a milk protein called beta lactoglobulin (BLG) entombed in the mineralised dental plaque of seven individuals who lived in the Neolithic period around 6,000 years-ago. (2019-09-10)
Tides don't always flush water out to sea, study shows
In Willapa Bay in Washington state, scientists discovered that water washing over tidal flats during high tides is largely the same water that washed over them during the previous high tide. (2019-09-10)
Groundwater studies can be tainted by 'survivor bias'
Bad wells tend to get excluded from studies on groundwater levels, a problem that could skew results everywhere monitoring is used to decide government policies and spending. (2019-09-05)
Ancient DNA from Central and South Asia reveals movement of people and language in Eurasia
A genome-wide analysis of ancient DNA from more than 500 individuals from across South and Central Asia sheds light on the complex genetic ancestry of the region's modern people. (2019-09-05)
Wild ground-nesting bees might be exposed to lethal levels of neonics in soil
In a first-ever study investigating the risk of neonicotinoid insecticides to ground-nesting bees, University of Guelph researchers have discovered hoary squash bees are being exposed to lethal levels of the chemicals in the soil. (2019-08-26)
Optimizing fertilizer source and rate to avoid root death
Study assembles canola root's dose-response curves for nitrogen sources. (2019-08-21)
Ancient pigs endured a complete genomic turnover after they arrived in Europe
New research led by Oxford University and Queen Mary University of London has resolved a pig paradox. (2019-08-12)
Artificial intelligence helps banana growers protect the world's most favorite fruit
Using artificial intelligence, scientists created an easy-to-use tool to detect banana diseases and pests. (2019-08-12)
Alternatives to burning can increase Indian farmers' profits and cut pollution
A new study published in Science shows that farmers in northern India could increase their profits if they stop burning their rice straw and adopt no-till practices to grow wheat. (2019-08-08)
Fighting a mighty weed
Weeds are pesky in any situation. Now, imagine a weed so troublesome that it has mutated to resist multiple herbicides. (2019-08-07)
Cover crops, compost and carbon
Comparing techniques in organic farming that influence soil health. (2019-08-07)
Fertilizer feast and famine
Research led by the University of California, Davis identifies five strategies to tackle the two-sided challenge of a lack of fertilizer in some emerging market economies and inefficient use of fertilizer in developed countries. (2019-08-05)
Scientists propose environmentally friendly control practices for harmful tomato disease
Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD) is the most destructive disease of tomato, causing severe damage to crops worldwide and resulting in high economic losses. (2019-08-05)
Cheater, cheater: Human Behavior Lab studies cheating as innate trait
The Texas A&M Human Behavior Lab took a closer look at cheating during periods of relative economic abundance and scarcity to determine whether cheating for monetary gain is a product of the economic environment. (2019-08-01)
Overturning the truth on conservation tillage
Conservation tillage does not lower yield in modern cropping systems. (2019-07-31)
To conserve water, Indian farmers fire up air pollution
A measure to conserve groundwater in northwestern India has led to unexpected consequences: added air pollution in an area already beset by haze and smog. (2019-07-30)
New, portable tech sniffs out plant disease in the field
Researchers have developed portable technology that allows farmers to identify plant diseases in the field. (2019-07-29)
The democratic governance of agricultural multinationals is essential for environmental sustainability
An international team of researchers investigate how partnering works to achieve sustainability in agri food supply chains using using a pioneer case study: Barilla Sustainable Farming (BSF) (2019-07-26)
Garlic on broccoli: A smelly approach to repel a major pest
New University of Vermont study offers a novel framework to test strategies for managing invasive pests. (2019-07-23)
Long live the long-limbed African chicken
For generations, household farmers in the Horn of Africa have selectively chosen chickens with certain traits that make them more appealing. (2019-07-16)
More farmers, more problems: How smallholder agriculture is threatening the western Amazon
Small-scale farmers are posing serious threats to biodiversity in northeastern Peru -- and the problem will likely only get worse. (2019-07-15)
Yield-boosting stay-green gene identified from 118-year-old experiment in corn
A corn gene identified from a 118-year-old experiment at the University of Illinois could boost yields of today's elite hybrids with no added inputs. (2019-07-11)
Participating in local food projects may improve mental health
A new study soon to be available in the Journal of Public Health, published by Oxford University Press, suggests that participating in local food projects may have a positive effect on psychological health. (2019-07-09)
Plant nutrient detector breakthrough
Findings from La Trobe University-led research could lead to less fertilizer wastage, saving millions of dollars for Australian farmers. (2019-07-06)
Millet farmers adopted barley agriculture and permanently settled the Tibetan Plateau
The permanent human occupation on the Tibetan Plateau was facilitated by the introduction of cold-tolerant barley around 3600 years before present, however, how barley agriculture spread onto the Tibetan Plateau remains unknown. (2019-07-02)
Irrigated farming in Wisconsin's central sands cools the region's climate
Irrigation dropped maximum temperatures by one to three degrees Fahrenheit on average while increasing minimum temperatures up to four degrees compared to unirrigated farms or forests, new research shows In all, irrigated farms experienced a three- to seven-degree smaller range in daily temperatures compared to other land uses. (2019-07-02)
Fairtrade benefits rural workers in Africa, but not the poorest of the poor
A new study from the University of Göttingen and international partners has analysed the effects of Fairtrade certification on poor rural workers in Africa. (2019-07-01)
'Planting green' cover-crop strategy may help farmers deal with wet springs
Allowing cover crops to grow two weeks longer in the spring and planting corn and soybean crops into them before termination is a strategy that may help no-till farmers deal with wet springs, according to Penn State researchers. (2019-07-01)
Natural biodiversity protects rural farmers' incomes from tropical weather shocks
A big data study covering more than 7,500 households across 23 tropical countries shows that natural biodiversity could be effective insurance for rural farmers against drought and other weather-related shocks. (2019-06-27)
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