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Current Feathers News and Events

Current Feathers News and Events, Feathers News Articles.
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Why are there no animals with three legs?
If 'Why?' is the first question in science, 'Why not?' must be a close second. (2019-10-01)
Collapse of desert bird populations likely due to heat stress from climate change
Last year, UC Berkeley biologists discovered that bird populations in the Mojave Desert had crashed over the past 100 years. (2019-09-30)
Scientists identify previously unknown 'hybrid zone' between hummingbird species
We usually think of a species as being reproductively isolated -- that is, not mating with other species in the wild. (2019-09-17)
The genealogy of important broiler ancestor revealed
A new study examines the historical and genetic origins of the White Plymouth Rock chicken, an important contributor to today's meat chickens (broilers). (2019-08-27)
These migratory birds will risk their lives for a good nap
As reported in the journal Current Biology on Aug. 19, migrating birds that are low on fat reserves will tuck their heads under their feathers for a deep snooze. (2019-08-19)
How the pufferfish got its wacky spines
Pufferfish are known for their strange and extreme skin ornaments, but how they came to possess the spiky skin structures known as spines has largely remained a mystery. (2019-07-25)
Long live the long-limbed African chicken
For generations, household farmers in the Horn of Africa have selectively chosen chickens with certain traits that make them more appealing. (2019-07-16)
Blue color tones in fossilized prehistoric feathers
Examining fossilized pigments, scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered new insights into blue color tones in prehistoric birds. (2019-06-25)
Sex, lice and videotape
University of Utah biologists demonstrated real-time adaptation in their lab that triggered reproductive isolation in just four years. (2019-06-10)
Feathers came first, then birds
New research, led by the University of Bristol, suggests that feathers arose 100 million years before birds -- changing how we look at dinosaurs, birds, and pterosaurs, the flying reptiles. (2019-06-03)
New leaf shapes for thale cress
Max Planck researchers equip the plant with pinnate leaves. (2019-05-23)
In a first, researchers identify reddish coloring in an ancient fossil
Researchers have for the first time detected chemical traces of red pigment in an ancient fossil -- an exceptionally well-preserved mouse, not unlike today's field mice, that roamed the fields of what is now the German village of Willershausen around 3 million years ago. (2019-05-21)
Flamingoes, elephants and sharks: How do blind adults learn about animal appearance?
They've never seen animals like hippos and sharks but adults born blind have rich insight into what they look like, a new Johns Hopkins University study found. (2019-05-21)
Gold makes invisible surfaces visible in CT
Zoologists in Cologne and Bonn have developed a new method for displaying previously invisible surface details using computer tomography. (2019-05-08)
New Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur sheds light on origin of flight in Dinosauria
A new Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur from 163-million-year-old fossil deposits in northeastern China provides new information regarding the incredible richness of evolutionary experimentation that characterized the origin of flight in the Dinosauria. (2019-05-08)
Flies smell through a Gore-Tex system
A research group led by a scientist of the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has gained important insights into how the nanopores that allow the fruit fly to detect chemicals in the air, and has identified the gene responsible for their development. (2019-04-18)
Petting zoos could potentially transmit highly virulent drug-resistant bacteria to visitors
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that petting zoos can create a diverse reservoir of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria, which could lead to highly virulent drug-resistant pathogens being passed on to visitors. (2019-04-13)
Feather mites may help clean birds' plumage, study shows
Feather mites help to remove bacteria and fungi from the feathers of birds, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-03-28)
Genetic tagging may help conserve the world's wildlife
Tracking animals using DNA signatures are ideally suited to answer the pressing questions required to conserve the world's wildlife, providing benefits over invasive methods such as ear tags and collars, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-03-26)
Colourful male fish have genes to thank for their enduring looks
Striking colours that are seen only in the males of some species are partly explained by gene behaviour, research into guppy fish suggests. (2019-03-22)
Ancient birds out of the egg running
Using their own laser imaging technology, Dr Michael Pittman from the Department of Earth Sciences at The University of Hong Kong and Thomas G Kaye from the Foundation for Scientific Advancement in the USA determined the lifestyle of a special hatchling bird by revealing the previously unknown feathering preserved in the fossil specimen found in the ~125 million-year-old Early Cretaceous fossil beds of Los Hoyas, Spain. (2019-03-21)
University of Utah biologists experimentally trigger adaptive radiation
Using host-specific parasites isolated on individual pigeon 'islands,' the scientists showed that descendants of a single population of feather lice adapted rapidly in response to preening. (2019-03-05)
Cracking feather formation could lead to cooler birds
Scientists have revealed how bird feathers form in a wave-like motion, creating a regular pattern in the skin. (2019-02-21)
Earliest known seed-eating perching bird discovered in Fossil Lake, Wyoming
The 'perching birds,' or passerines, are the most common birds in the world today -- they include sparrows, robins, and finches. (2019-02-07)
Poor diet may have caused nosedive in major Atlantic seabird nesting colony
The observed population crash in a colony of sooty terns, tropical seabirds in one of the UK Overseas Territories, is partly due to poor diet, research led by the University of Birmingham has found. (2019-02-03)
Imperceptible movements guide juvenile zebra finch song development
New research from Cornell University shows zebra finches engage in socially guided vocal learning, where they learn their songs by watching their mothers' reactions to their immature songs. (2019-01-31)
Structural colors, without the shimmer
Structural colors, like those found in some butterflies' wings, birds' feathers and beetles' backs, resist fading because they don't absorb light like dyes and pigments. (2019-01-30)
Birds-of-paradise genomes target sexual selection
Researchers provide genome sequences for 5 birds-of-paradise species: 3 without previous genome data and 2 with improved data. (2019-01-28)
Molecular analysis of anchiornis feather gives clues to origin of flight
An international team of researchers has performed molecular analysis on fossil feathers from a small, feathered dinosaur from the Jurassic. (2019-01-28)
Study shows flight limitations of earliest feathered dinosaurs
Anchiornis, one of the earliest feathered dinosaurs ever discovered, was found to have the ability to fly. (2019-01-28)
Jellyfish map could be the future to protecting UK waters and fish
A University of Southampton research team has developed a map of chemicals found in Jellyfish caught across 1 million square-kilometres of UK waters. (2019-01-16)
Feathers: better than Velcro?
The structures zipping together the barbs in bird feathers could provide a model for new adhesives and new aerospace materials, according to a study by an international team of researchers publishing in the Jan. (2019-01-16)
HKU fossil imaging helps push back feather origins by 70 million years
In a new study published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, an international team led by Professor Baoyu Jiang of Nanjing University and including Dr Michael Pittman of the Department of Earth Sciences, the University of Hong Kong, shows that pterosaurs had at least four types of feathers in common with their close relatives the dinosaurs, pushing back the origin of feathers by some 70 million years. (2018-12-18)
Dive-bombing for love: Male hummingbirds dazzle females with a highly synchronized display
Male Broad-tailed Hummingbirds perform dramatic aerial courtship dives to impress females. (2018-12-18)
New discovery pushes origin of feathers back by 70 million years
An international team of palaeontologists, which includes the University of Bristol, has discovered that the flying reptiles, pterosaurs, actually had four kinds of feathers, and these are shared with dinosaurs -- pushing back the origin of feathers by some 70 million years. (2018-12-17)
More 'heatwave' summers will affect animals
Heatwaves similar to those experienced in Europe in 2018 can have a very negative impact on animals. (2018-12-12)
Scientists discover how birds and dinosaurs evolved to dazzle with colourful displays
Iridescence is responsible for some of the most striking visual displays in the animal kingdom. (2018-12-10)
33-million-year-old whale from Oregon had neither teeth nor baleen
A study reported in Current Biology on Nov. 29 describes a 33-million-year-old fossil whale named Maiabalaena, which means 'mother whale.' The ancient whale from Oregon is especially remarkable in that it had neither teeth nor baleen. (2018-11-29)
Indian peafowls' crests are tuned to frequencies also used in social displays
Indian peafowl crests resonate efficiently and specifically to the same vibration frequencies used in peacock social displays, according to a paper published November 28, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Suzanne Amador Kane from Haverford College, USA, and colleagues. (2018-11-28)
Rare fossil bird deepens mystery of avian extinctions
Today's birds descend from a small number of bird species living before the dinosaur extinction. (2018-11-13)
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