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Pretty as a peacock: The gemstone for the next generation of smart sensors
Scientists have taken inspiration from the biomimicry of butterfly wings and peacock feathers to develop an innovative opal-like material that could be the cornerstone of next generation smart sensors. (2020-05-19)
Microscopic feather features reveal fossil birds' colors and explain why cassowaries shine
Some birds are iridescent because of the physical make-up of their feathers, but scientists had never found evidence of this structural color in the group of birds containing ostriches and cassowaries -- until now. (2020-05-13)
Birds take flight with help from Sonic hedgehog
Flight feathers are amazing evolutionary innovations that allowed birds to conquer the sky. (2020-05-06)
New feathered dinosaur was one of the last surviving raptors
Dineobellator notohesperus lived 67 million years ago. Steven Jasinski, who recently earned his doctorate from the School of Arts and Sciences working with Peter Dodson, also of the School of Veterinary Medicine, described the find. (2020-03-26)
Is intensive agriculture reducing mourning dove reproduction in the eastern US?
Populations of some common bird species, including the familiar mourning dove, have been on the decline in North America. (2020-03-11)
Stanford scientists discover the mathematical rules underpinning brain growth
'How do cells with complementary functions arrange themselves to construct a functioning tissue?' said study co-author Bo Wang, an assistant professor of Bioengineering. (2020-03-11)
'PigeonBot's' feather-level insights push flying bots closer to mimicking birds
Birds fly in a meticulous manner not yet replicable by human-made machines, though two new studies in Science Robotics and Science -- by uncovering more about what gives birds this unparalleled control -- pave the way to flying robots that can maneuver the air as nimbly as birds. (2020-01-16)
New dinosaur discovered in China shows dinosaurs grew up differently from birds
A new species of feathered dinosaur has been discovered in China, and described by American and Chinese authors in The Anatomical Record. (2020-01-15)
Hummingbirds' rainbow colors come from pancake-shaped structures in their feathers
Hummingbirds are some of the most brightly-colored things in the entire world. (2020-01-10)
The mysterious case of the ornamented coot chicks has a surprising explanation
The American coot is a somewhat drab water bird with gray and black feathers and a white beak, common in wetlands throughout North America. (2019-12-30)
Siting cell towers needs careful planning
The health impacts of radio-frequency radiation (RFR) are still inconclusive, but the data to date warrants more caution in placing cell towers. (2019-12-03)
Whaling and climate change led to 100 years of feast or famine for Antarctic penguins
New research reveals how penguins have dealt with more than a century of human impacts in Antarctica and why some species are winners or losers in this rapidly changing ecosystem. (2019-12-02)
Climate change and human activities threatens picky penguins
Eating a krill-only diet has made one variety of Antarctic penguin especially susceptible to the impacts of climate change, according to new research involving the University of Saskatchewan (USask) which sheds new light on why some penguins are winners and others losers in their rapidly changing ecosystem. (2019-12-02)
Researchers study chickens, ostriches, penguins to learn how flight feathers evolved
If you took a careful look at the feathers on a chicken, you'd find many different forms within the same bird -- even within a single feather. (2019-11-27)
USC researchers show how feathers propel birds through air and history
A comparison of flight feathers shows key functional and structural differences that propelled birds through evolution and across the planet. (2019-11-27)
Puffins stay cool thanks to their large beak
Tufted puffins regulate their body temperature thanks to their large bills, an evolutionary trait that might explain their capacity to fly for long periods in search for food. (2019-11-27)
Optimal archery feather design depends on environmental conditions
When it comes to archery, choosing the right feathers for an arrow is the key to winning. (2019-11-23)
Body language key to zoo animal welfare
Watching the behavior and body language of zoo animals could be the key to understanding and improving their welfare, new research suggests. (2019-11-13)
First evidence of feathered polar dinosaurs found in Australia
A cache of 118 million-year-old fossilized dinosaur and bird feathers has been recovered from an ancient lake deposit that once lay beyond the southern polar circle. (2019-11-12)
Study addresses one of the most challenging problems in educational policy and practice
Language proficiency has an important influence on learners' ability to answer scientific questions a new joint study by Lancaster and Sheffield Universities has found. (2019-10-31)
Bird bacteria is key to communication and mating
Birds use odor to identify other birds, and researchers at Michigan State University have shown that if the bacteria that produce the odor is altered, it could negatively impact a bird's ability to communicate with other birds or find a mate. (2019-10-29)
Paleontologists discover complete Saurornitholestes langstoni specimen
The discovery of a nearly complete dromaeosaurid Saurornitholestes langstoni specimen is providing critical information for the evolution of theropod dinosaurs, according to new research by a University of Alberta paleontologist. (2019-10-17)
Why are there no animals with three legs?
If 'Why?' is the first question in science, 'Why not?' must be a close second. (2019-10-01)
Collapse of desert bird populations likely due to heat stress from climate change
Last year, UC Berkeley biologists discovered that bird populations in the Mojave Desert had crashed over the past 100 years. (2019-09-30)
Scientists identify previously unknown 'hybrid zone' between hummingbird species
We usually think of a species as being reproductively isolated -- that is, not mating with other species in the wild. (2019-09-17)
The genealogy of important broiler ancestor revealed
A new study examines the historical and genetic origins of the White Plymouth Rock chicken, an important contributor to today's meat chickens (broilers). (2019-08-27)
These migratory birds will risk their lives for a good nap
As reported in the journal Current Biology on Aug. 19, migrating birds that are low on fat reserves will tuck their heads under their feathers for a deep snooze. (2019-08-19)
How the pufferfish got its wacky spines
Pufferfish are known for their strange and extreme skin ornaments, but how they came to possess the spiky skin structures known as spines has largely remained a mystery. (2019-07-25)
Long live the long-limbed African chicken
For generations, household farmers in the Horn of Africa have selectively chosen chickens with certain traits that make them more appealing. (2019-07-16)
Blue color tones in fossilized prehistoric feathers
Examining fossilized pigments, scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered new insights into blue color tones in prehistoric birds. (2019-06-25)
Sex, lice and videotape
University of Utah biologists demonstrated real-time adaptation in their lab that triggered reproductive isolation in just four years. (2019-06-10)
Feathers came first, then birds
New research, led by the University of Bristol, suggests that feathers arose 100 million years before birds -- changing how we look at dinosaurs, birds, and pterosaurs, the flying reptiles. (2019-06-03)
New leaf shapes for thale cress
Max Planck researchers equip the plant with pinnate leaves. (2019-05-23)
In a first, researchers identify reddish coloring in an ancient fossil
Researchers have for the first time detected chemical traces of red pigment in an ancient fossil -- an exceptionally well-preserved mouse, not unlike today's field mice, that roamed the fields of what is now the German village of Willershausen around 3 million years ago. (2019-05-21)
Flamingoes, elephants and sharks: How do blind adults learn about animal appearance?
They've never seen animals like hippos and sharks but adults born blind have rich insight into what they look like, a new Johns Hopkins University study found. (2019-05-21)
Gold makes invisible surfaces visible in CT
Zoologists in Cologne and Bonn have developed a new method for displaying previously invisible surface details using computer tomography. (2019-05-08)
New Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur sheds light on origin of flight in Dinosauria
A new Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur from 163-million-year-old fossil deposits in northeastern China provides new information regarding the incredible richness of evolutionary experimentation that characterized the origin of flight in the Dinosauria. (2019-05-08)
Flies smell through a Gore-Tex system
A research group led by a scientist of the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has gained important insights into how the nanopores that allow the fruit fly to detect chemicals in the air, and has identified the gene responsible for their development. (2019-04-18)
Petting zoos could potentially transmit highly virulent drug-resistant bacteria to visitors
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that petting zoos can create a diverse reservoir of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria, which could lead to highly virulent drug-resistant pathogens being passed on to visitors. (2019-04-13)
Feather mites may help clean birds' plumage, study shows
Feather mites help to remove bacteria and fungi from the feathers of birds, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-03-28)
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