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Current Fibroblasts News and Events

Current Fibroblasts News and Events, Fibroblasts News Articles.
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CU researchers identify potential target for cardiac fibrosis treatment
A research team led by scientists at the University of Colorado School of Medicine has identified a potential target for treating heart failure related to fibrosis. (2019-09-17)
New cardiac fibrosis study identifies key proteins that translate into heart disease
The formation of excess fibrous tissue in the heart, which underlies several heart diseases, could be prevented by inhibiting specific proteins that bind to RNA while its code is being translated. (2019-09-12)
CAR T-cell therapy may be harnessed to treat heart disease
CAR T-cell therapy, a rapidly emerging form of immunotherapy using patients' own cells to treat certain types of cancers, may be a viable treatment option for another life-threatening condition: heart disease. (2019-09-11)
Bioengineers explore cardiac tissue remodeling after aortic valve replacement procedures
Researchers have developed biomaterial-based 'mimics' of heart tissues to measure patients' responses to an aortic valve replacement procedure, offering new insight into the ways that cardiac tissue re-shapes itself post-surgery. (2019-09-11)
Key to targeting the spread of pancreatic cancer
Targeting the tissue around pancreatic cancer cells may be the key to stopping their spread and improving chemotherapy outcomes. (2019-08-12)
How cigarette smoke makes head and neck cancer more aggressive
A change in the tumor metabolism due to tobacco exposure could open new treatment avenues in head and neck cancer. (2019-08-08)
'Promising' antibody therapy extends survival in mice with pancreatic cancer
Scientists have found a way to target and knock out a single protein that they have discovered is widely involved in pancreatic cancer cell growth, survival and invasion. (2019-07-31)
Signals from skin cells control fat cell specialization
When cells change to a more specialized type, we call this process cellular differentiation. (2019-07-25)
Disrupting immune cell behavior may contribute to heart disease and failure, study shows
A new study, led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, provides evidence that when circulating anti-inflammatory white blood cells known as monocytes fail to properly differentiate into macrophages -- the cells that engulf and digest cellular debris, bacteria and viruses -- certain forms of heart disease may result. (2019-07-24)
Rare inherited enzyme disorder yields insight into fibrosis
St. Jude investigators have discovered an association between a deficiency in the enzyme neuraminidase 1 and the build-up of connective tissue in organs, suck as the muscle, kidney, liver, heart and lungs. (2019-07-17)
Scientists make single-cell map to reprogram scar tissue into healthy heart cells
Annually, about 790,000 Americans suffer a heart attack, which leaves damaged scar tissue on the heart and limits its ability to beat efficiently. (2019-06-20)
Repurposing existing drugs or combining therapies could help in the treatment of autoimmune diseases
Research has found that re-purposing already existing drugs or combining therapies could be used to treat patients who have difficult to treat autoimmune diseases. (2019-06-17)
Special fibroblasts help pancreatic cancer cells evade immune detection
A subpopulation of fibroblasts called apCAFs can interact with the immune system to help pancreatic cancer cells avoid detection. (2019-06-13)
New radiotracer can identify nearly 30 types of cancer
A novel class of radiopharmaceuticals has proven effective in non-invasively identifying nearly 30 types of malignant tumors. (2019-06-07)
Key link discovered between tissue cell type and different forms of arthritis
Research shows, for the first time, that different types of fibroblasts -- the most common cells of connective tissue in animals -- are organized in different layers in the joint and are responsible for two very different forms of arthritis; osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. (2019-05-29)
New understanding of how cells form tunnels may help in treating wounds, tumors
'A major aspect of our research is that it just really illustrates how complex all these different components are going on inside a person's body,' said Andrew Ford. (2019-05-23)
The Estée Lauder Companies showcases new research on combating aging at 2019 SID Meeting
The Estée Lauder Companies Inc. Research & Development (R&D) team will present research focused on new findings in skin defense and anti-aging research at the 2019 Society for Investigative Dermatology Meeting (SID) in Chicago from May 8th - 11th. (2019-05-08)
Missing molecule hobbles cell movement
Cells are the body's workers, and they often need to move around to do their jobs. (2019-05-03)
Changes in the metabolism of normal cells promotes the metastasis of ovarian cancer cells
A systematic examination of the tumor and the tissue surrounding it -- particularly normal cells in that tissue, called fibroblasts -- has revealed a new treatment target that could potentially prevent the rapid dissemination and poor prognosis associated with high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC), a tumor type that primarily originates in the fallopian tubes or ovaries and spreads throughout the abdominal cavity. (2019-05-01)
IDIBELL -- ICO researchers set new bases to develop therapies against colorectal cancer
IDIBELL -- ICO researchers in Barcelona have found that inactivation of two proteins make tumoral cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. (2019-04-17)
Study: Protein linked to cancer growth drives deadly lung disease
A protein associated with cancer growth appears to drive the deadly lung disease known as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, according to new research from Cedars-Sinai. (2019-03-20)
New 'tracers' improve diagnosis of cancer and may be useful for treatment
Researchers have identified two new nuclear medicine tracers that make it easier to diagnose and potentially treat multiple types of cancer, providing high-quality images with less patient preparation and shorter acquisition times. (2019-03-11)
Anti-inflammatory drug is the key to boosting cardiac reprogramming
University of Tsukuba researchers and colleagues developed a high-throughput screening system to identify the NSAID diclofenac as a factor responsible for enhancing cardiac reprogramming in postnatal and adult fibroblasts. (2019-03-06)
Plasma protein may hold promise for wound scaffolds
Researchers in Germany have employed a plasma protein found in blood to develop a new method for making wound-healing tissue scaffolds. (2019-03-04)
Mobile bedside bioprinter can heal wounds
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists have created such a mobile skin bioprinting system -- the first of its kind -- that allows bi-layered skin to be printed directly into a wound. (2019-02-28)
Media alert: New articles in the CRISPR Journal
The CRISPR Journal announces the publication of its February 2019 issue. (2019-02-21)
Pioneering study could offer protection to patients with rare genetic disease
Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A (AVA) radiation in laboratory tests, than those from a healthy population, according to new research from the University of Bath. (2019-02-21)
Advancing therapy by measuring the 'games' cancer cells play
Despite rapid advances in targeted therapies for cancer, tumors commonly develop resistance to treatment. (2019-02-18)
Vitamin D and immune cells stimulate bone marrow disease
The bone marrow disease myelofibrosis is stimulated by excessive signaling from vitamin D and immune cells known as macrophages, reveals a Japanese research team. (2019-02-08)
UCI-led study reveals how blood cells help wounds heal scar-free
New insights on circumventing a key obstacle on the road to anti-scarring treatment have been published by Maksim Plikus, an associate professor in development and cell biology at the UCI School of Biological Sciences and colleagues in Nature Communications. (2019-02-08)
Gene-edited disease monkeys cloned in China
National Science Review, a leading journal from China that reports on significant advances in natural sciences, publishes on-line two research articles in tandem on the generation of macaque monkeys with phenotypes of circadian disorders by gene-editing of monkey embryos, and the generation a group of cloned monkeys using somatic cells from one of the gene-edited monkeys, showing that macaque monkey disease models with uniform genetic background could now be produced for biomedical research. (2019-01-23)
Research confirms nerve cells made from skin cells are a valid lab model for studying disease
Researchers from the Salk Institute, along with collaborators at Stanford University and Baylor College of Medicine, have shown that cells from mice that have been induced to grow into nerve cells using a previously published method have molecular signatures matching neurons that developed naturally in the brain. (2019-01-15)
Life-threatening lung disease averted in experimental models
Combining cutting-edge single-cell sequencing with novel computational techniques, UC San Francisco researchers identified a new type of immune cell that infiltrates lung tissue and initiates fibrosis. (2019-01-14)
Powerful microscope captures first image of nanoscaffold that promotes cell movement
Using one of the most powerful microscopes in the world, scientists from SBP and UNC-Chapel Hill have identified a dense, dynamic and disorganized actin filament nanoscaffold -- resembling a haystack -- that is induced in response to a molecular signal. (2019-01-11)
NYUAD study suggests that 'Actin' is critical in genome regulation during nerve cell formation
One of the most fascinating questions in biology is how genes are regulated during development and differentiation when cells acquire a specific identity. (2018-12-31)
UC San Diego researchers identify how skin ages, loses fat and immunity
Some dermal fibroblasts can convert into fat cells that reside under the dermis, giving skin a youthful look and producing peptides that fight infections. (2018-12-26)
Age is more than just a number: Machine learning may predict if you're in for a healthy old age
A collaborative team at the Salk Institute analyzed skin cells from the very young to the very old and looked for molecular signatures that can be predictive of age. (2018-12-20)
Can stem cells help a diseased heart heal itself? Researcher achieves important milestone
A team of Rutgers scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices. (2018-12-14)
Breast cancer recruits bone marrow cells to increase cancer cell proliferation
Tel Aviv University researchers have discovered that breast cancer tumors boost their growth by recruiting stromal cells that originate in bone marrow. (2018-12-10)
The 'wrong' connective tissue cells signal worse prognosis for breast cancer patients
In certain forms of cancer, connective tissue forms around and within the tumour. (2018-12-04)
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