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Current Fibroblasts News and Events, Fibroblasts News Articles.
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Pulmonary fibrosis treatment shows proof of principle
A pre-clinical study led by scientists at Cincinnati Children's demonstrates that in mice the drug barasertib reverses the activation of fibroblasts that cause dangerous scar tissue to build up in the lungs of people with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). (2020-08-06)
New insights into wound healing
Research from a multidisciplinary team led by Washington University may provide new insights into wound healing, scarring and how cancer spreads (2020-07-29)
Mix and match: New 3D cell culture model replicates fibrotic elements of pancreatic cancer
Pancreatic cancer is a deadly cancer characterized by prominent fibrosis, which plays a crucial role in disease progression and therapeutic resistance. (2020-07-22)
Cell death in porpoises caused by environmental pollutants
Environmental pollutants threaten the health of marine mammals. This study established a novel cell-based assay using the fibroblasts of a finless porpoise stranded along the coast of the Seto Inland Sea, Japan, to better understand the cytotoxicity and the impacts of environmental pollutants on the porpoise population. (2020-07-20)
Cardiac scar tissue: A factor which regulates its size
As recently published in the journal Cell, a collaborative group including Ali Khademhosseini, Ph.D. and Samad Ahadian, Ph.D., of the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation (TIBI), has identified collagen V as an important factor in the scarring process and observed that large quantities of collagen V were found in cardiac injury scars. (2020-07-13)
Expansion stress enhances growth and migration of breast cancer cells
Expansion stress can have an alarming impact on breast cancer cells by creating conditions that could lead to dangerous acceleration of the disease, an interdisciplinary team of University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers has found. (2020-07-09)
How the body regulates scar tissue growth after heart attacks
New UCLA research conducted in mice could explain why some people suffer more extensive scarring than others after a heart attack. (2020-07-03)
A simpler way to make sensory hearing cells
Scientists from the USC Stem Cell laboratories of Neil Segil and Justin Ichida are whispering the secrets of a simpler way to generate the sensory cells of the inner ear. (2020-07-01)
One-time treatment generates new neurons, eliminates Parkinson's disease in mice
UC San Diego researchers have discovered that a single treatment to inhibit a gene called PTB in mice converts native astrocytes, brain support cells, into neurons that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. (2020-06-24)
Direct reprogramming: Defying the contemporary limitations in cardiac regeneration
Repair and regeneration of myocardium are the best possible therapy for the end-stage heart failure patients because the current therapies that can help restore the lost cardiomyocytes are limited to heart transplantation only. (2020-06-22)
Loss of lipid-regulating gene fuels prostate cancer spread
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers from the Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences identified a lipid-regulating protein that conveys what the researchers describe as ''superpowers'' onto prostate cancer cells, causing them to aggressively spread. (2020-06-16)
Prodigiosin-based solution has selective activity against cancer cells
Together with colleagues from the University of Palermo, KFU employees offer a nano preparation based on biocompatible halloysite nanotubes and bacterial pigment prodigiosin; the latter is known to selectively disrupt cancer cells without damaging the healthy ones. (2020-06-12)
Researchers identify 'hot spots' for developing lymphatic vessels
The development of the lymphatic vasculature is crucially dependent on one specific protein -- the growth factor VEGF-C. (2020-06-11)
Biochemical alterations revealed in patients with Lesch-Nyhan disease
An international study by the Institute of Neuroscience of the UAB (INC-UAB), Emory University and Hospital Universitario La Paz, published in the PNAS journal, shows that patients suffering from Lesch-Nyhan, a rare neurological disease, present biochemical alterations in skin cells (fibroblasts), urine and cerebrospinal fluid. (2020-06-04)
Researchers identify secretion mechanisms for a protein necessary for maintaining healthy connective
Researchers have discovered that a defective form of the protein aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) from patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is retained in cells and induces cellular stress. (2020-06-03)
Extracellular vesicles play an important role in the pathology of malaria vivax
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in the pathogenesis of malaria vivax, according to a study led by researchers from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) and the Germans Trias i Pujol Health Science Research Institute (IGTP). (2020-06-02)
Cancer cells cause inflammation to protect themselves from viruses
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have uncovered how cancer cells protect themselves from viruses that are harmful to tumors but not to healthy cells. (2020-06-01)
Blocking tumor signals can hinder cancer's spread
A University of Pennsylvania-led team used an inhibitor of an enzyme called p38α kinase to suppress the spread of melanoma to the lungs in a mouse model. (2020-05-28)
Rejuvenated fibroblasts can recover the ability to contract
A recent study from the Mechanobiology Institute at the National University of Singapore has shown that rejuvenated fibroblasts can recover their ability to self-contract. (2020-05-26)
Cell-culture based test systems for anticancer drug screening
As we know, a malignant tumor is a complex system of mutated cells which constantly interacts with and involves healthy cells in the body. (2020-05-21)
New rare disease with own facial features, cardiac defects and developmental delay
An international multicentre study describes a rare disease characterized by a series of recognizable facial features, cardiac defects and intellectual disability, which they propose to name as TRAF7 syndrome -according to the name of the gen that causes this pathology. (2020-05-19)
Why pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is so lethal
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma is a fast growing and invasive cancer, and now scientists understand the molecular dance that makes it so deadly. (2020-05-19)
A deeper connection to hyaline fibromatosis syndrome
EPFL scientists have uncovered the molecular biology behind Hyaline Fibromatosis Syndrome, a severe genetic disease. (2020-05-18)
Study reveals disparity between fibroblasts of different pancreatic diseases
Fibroblasts present in different pancreatic diseases are genetically distinct and their functions are 'programmed' by the unique environment of each disease, according to new research from the University of Liverpool (UK). (2020-05-18)
Can vaping scar your lungs? New insights and a possible remedy
Researchers report evidence that the compounds in e-cigarette liquid could potentially cause the body's tissue repair process to go haywire and lead to scarring inside the lungs. (2020-04-27)
Sanfilippo C syndrome: New brain cell models to evaluate therapies
The Sanfilippo syndrome type C is a severe neurodegenerative disease which appears during the first years of life and for which there is no treatment yet. (2020-04-24)
Interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts promote metastasis
In order to colonize other organs and grow into metastases, tumor cells that detach from the parent tumor need to manipulate their new microenvironment and create a 'metastatic niche'. (2020-03-23)
Study finds molecule in lymphatic system implicated in autoimmune diseases
A study by investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) has discovered a molecule in the lymphatic system that has the potential to play a role in autoimmune disease. (2020-03-20)
Possible treatment for breast cancer patients could roll out to clinical trial immediately
A worldwide collaborative study involving scientists at the University of Sussex has proposed a new treatment strategy for patients with a rare but aggressive subtype of cancer known as triple negative breast cancer. (2020-03-10)
'Primitive' stem cells shown to regenerate blood vessels in the eye
Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have successfully turned back the biological hands of time, coaxing adult human cells in the laboratory to revert to a primitive state, and unlocking their potential to replace and repair damage to blood vessels in the retina caused by diabetes. (2020-03-09)
Scientists show drug may greatly improve cancer immunotherapy success
A study led by the University of Southampton, funded by Cancer Research UK, has shown a new drug -- originally developed to tackle the scarring of organ tissue -- could help to significantly improve the success rate of cancer immunotherapy treatment. (2020-03-02)
A molecular atlas of skin cells
Our skin protects us from physical injury, radiation and microbes, and at the same time produces hair and facilitates perspiration. (2020-02-27)
Structural framework for tumors also provides immune protection
Aggressive colorectal cancers set up an interactive network of checkpoints to keep the immune system at bay, scientists report. (2020-02-26)
New light shed on damaging impact of infrared and visible rays on skin
New research reveals for the first time that UV combined with visible and infrared light cause damage to the skin and we need to protect our skin against all three to prevent aging. (2020-01-23)
New radiotracer offers opportunities for earlier intervention after heart attack
A new radiotracer can effectively image fibroblast activation after a heart attack, identifying a window of time during which cardiac fibrosis can be prevented and the disease course altered. (2020-01-02)
Fibroblasts involved in healing spur tumor growth in cancer
The connective tissue cells known as fibroblasts are vitally important for our recovery from injury. (2019-12-19)
Study finds common cold virus can infect the placenta
For the first time, researchers have shown that a common cold virus can infect cells derived from human placentas, suggesting that it may be possible for the infection to pass from expectant mothers to their unborn children. (2019-12-02)
How do scars form? Fascia function as a repository of mobile scar tissue
In the riddle about the origin of scar tissue, researchers have reached an important next step. (2019-11-27)
Researchers identify a molecular mechanism involved in Huntington's disease
Researchers from the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro) and the August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS) described a mechanism, the increase of proteinaceous synthesis, which takes part in the degeneration of the type of neurons that are affected in Huntington's disease, a genetic neurodegenerative disease. (2019-11-20)
New advances in the treatment of advanced lung cancer
The University of Barcelona (UB) and Hospital Clínic de Barcelona collaborate with Boehringer Ingelheim Inc. to improve the efficiency of nintedanib, an antiangiogenic and antifibrotic drug, for the treatment of lung cancer. (2019-11-19)
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