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Current Firefighters News and Events, Firefighters News Articles.
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Limit fire service instructors' exposures per month to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease
New research published in Experimental Physiology suggests that fire service instructors are at increased risk of cardiovascular diseases due to higher levels of inflammation in their blood, and so their exposure should be limited to nine exposures per month. (2020-05-26)
Millions of US workers at risk of infections on the job
A University of Washington researcher calculates that 14.4 million workers face exposure to infection once a week and 26.7 million at least once a month in the workplace, pointing to an important population needing protection as the novel coronavirus disease, COVID-19, continues to break out across the US. (2020-04-29)
Water replaces toxins: Green production of plastics
A new way to synthesize polymers, called hydrothermal synthesis, can be used to produce important high-performance materials in a way which is much better for the environment. (2020-04-21)
Women firefighters face high exposure to toxic PFAS chemicals
San Francisco's women firefighters are exposed to higher levels of certain toxic PFAS chemicals than women working in downtown San Francisco offices, shows a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of California, San Francisco, and Silent Spring Institute. (2020-02-26)
Comparing PFAS exposures in female firefighters and office workers
Firefighters have higher rates of some cancers than the general population, which might not be surprising given the many potential carcinogens they encounter while battling blazes. (2020-02-26)
Training the mind in resilience
Two new studies from University of Miami researchers found that offering mindfulness training in high-demand settings bolsters attention and resilience. (2020-02-19)
Sound of music: How melodic alarms could reduce morning grogginess
New research suggests melodic alarms could improve alertness, with harsh alarm tones linked to increased levels of morning grogginess. (2020-02-03)
Human-sparked fires smaller, less intense but more frequent with longer seasons
Fires started by people have steadily increased in recent decades, sparking a major shift in U.S. wildfire norms, according to a new CU Boulder-led study. (2020-01-21)
McMaster chemists find new way to break down old tires into material for new ones
A team of chemists at McMaster University has discovered an innovative way to break down and dissolve the rubber used in automobile tires, a process which could lead to new recycling methods that have so far proven to be expensive, difficult and largely inefficient. (2020-01-13)
Developed a band-aid-like sensor to detect human body conditions in real-time
DGIST announced that Professor Hyuk-Jun Kwon in the Department of Information and Communication Engineering developed a 'patch-based health diagnosis sensor system' that is easily attached to skin with Professor Sunkook Kim's research team at Sungkyunkwan University. (2020-01-08)
Research will help land managers take risk-analysis approach to new wildfire reality
New digital tools will enable land managers to better adapt to the new reality of large wildfires through analytics that guide planning and suppression across jurisdictional boundaries that fires typically don't adhere to. (2020-01-08)
Distress tolerance plays role in alcohol use and abuse among firefighters
A newly published report from a University of Houston psychology professor finds that firefighters who struggle with PTSD symptoms, and who think they cannot handle negative emotions, are likely to drink and use alcohol it to cope with negative emotions. (2019-12-03)
Mental health information in rural areas is best delivered face-to-face, study shows
Mental health is a concern in rural areas, as farmers cope with stress and uncertainty due to economic and environmental conditions. (2019-12-02)
Firefighters can ease one another's job stress, but loving spouses may increase it
Strong same-sex friendships among male firefighters can help cut down on their stress -- but loving relationships with their wives may increase anxiety for those who constantly face danger, according to a Baylor University study. (2019-11-13)
Light-based strategy effectively treats carbon monoxide poisoning in rats
Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital recently developed a phototherapy strategy that was highly effective for removing carbon monoxide in rats. (2019-10-10)
'Fire inversions' lock smoke in valleys
There's an atmospheric feedback loop, says University of Utah atmospheric scientist Adam Kochanski, that can lock smoke in valleys in much the same way that temperature inversions lock the smog and gunk in the Salt Lake Valley each winter. (2019-09-12)
Is exposure to world trade center disaster associated with cardiovascular disease risk for NY firefighters
A study of nearly 9,800 Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) male firefighters suggests an association between greater exposure to the World Trade Center disaster and long-term cardiovascular disease risk, while the results of other studies have been mixed. (2019-09-06)
9/11 World Trade Center exposure linked to heart disease among NYC firefighters
A study of New York City firefighters finds that exposure to 9/11 World Trade Center (WTC) dust is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). (2019-09-06)
Natural 'breakdown' of chemicals may guard against lung damage in 9/11 first responders
The presence of chemicals made as the body breaks down fats, proteins, and carbohydrates can predict whether Sept. (2019-09-03)
Police less proactive after negative public scrutiny, study says
Public safety officers know that their profession could draw them into the line of fire at any moment, as it did recently for six officers wounded in a shooting standoff in Philadelphia. (2019-08-19)
Recognizing kidney injury due to burns is improved by artificial intelligence
Many burn victims suffer acute kidney injury, but early recognition of the condition can be challenging. (2019-07-12)
Exposure to others' suffering even worse than being shot at
War veterans who were not personally in life-threatening danger have more psychological problems than those who were injured by gunfire, according to a study that surveyed Norwegian veterans after their return from Afghanistan. (2019-06-21)
Burnout: Sleepless firefighters at risk of exhaustion and mental health conditions
Sleep disturbances and mental health challenges are putting close to half of America's firefighters at high risk of emotional fatigue and exhaustion, new research by Monash University in Australia shows. (2019-06-20)
Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration
On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. (2019-06-19)
Female firefighters more likely to suffer PTSD, contemplate suicide
Female firefighters are fighting for their mental health as they perform their grueling duties. (2019-05-21)
Sex sells: how masculinity is used as currency to buy sperm donors' time
Sperm banks in the United Kingdom and Australia use images and phrases associated with masculinity to attract donors because laws prohibit them from paying for sperm. (2019-05-20)
Drexel-developed safety climate scale helps fire departments reach safety goals
A new safety scale, that effectively measures the safety climate of a fire department, has been developed by researchers from Drexel's Dornsife School of Public Health, according to a paper published today in the journal Safety Science. (2019-05-16)
Fire-safety sectors call for global PFAS ban, no loopholes for toxic firefighting foam
Fluorinated firefighting foam is a leading cause of PFAS water contamination and is associated with cancer and endocrine disruption. (2019-05-01)
Predicting the uphill battle
For wildland firefighters retreating from the fire to a safety zone, predicting how long it takes to move across terrain can be a matter of life and death. (2019-04-03)
Marine protected reserves do more than restore fish
In a new analysis of the effectiveness of marine protected areas worldwide, University of Massachusetts Amherst marine ecologist Brian Cheng and colleagues report that reserves not only replenish target fish populations, they also restore ecological functioning. (2019-04-01)
Handshakes or contracts?
A new study of US fire departments has found improvements differ for property damage and personal injuries or deaths, depending on whether the collaborations were informal, formal, or based on formal contracts without any prior history of working together. (2019-03-25)
Tracking firefighters in burning buildings
McMaster researchers, working with partners at other universities, have created a motion-powered, fireproof sensor that can track the movements of firefighters, steelworkers, miners and others who work in high-risk environments where they cannot always be seen. (2019-03-01)
Federal fire grant spending could be more balanced, new model suggests
The federal government considers many factors when spending money to prevent structure fires. (2019-02-25)
Push-up capacity linked with lower incidence of cardiovascular disease events among men
Active, middle-aged men able to complete more than 40 push-ups had a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes -- including diagnoses of coronary artery disease and major events such as heart failure -- during 10 years of follow-up compared with those who were able to do less than 10 push-ups during the baseline exam. (2019-02-15)
Fort McMurray homes have normal levels of indoor toxins, U of T Engineering study reveals
U of T Engineering researchers have examined dust from homes in Fort McMurray, Alta., for evidence of harmful toxins left in the aftermath of the devastating 2016 wildfire. (2019-01-14)
Hoosier firefighters face higher risk of dying from cancer than non-firefighters
Hoosier firefighters face a significantly higher risk of dying from cancer than non-firefighters in Indiana, according to a study that shows death from malignant cancers was the leading cause of death for Indiana firefighters between 1985 and 2013. (2018-12-03)
Light pollution makes fish more courageous
Artificial light at night also makes guppies more courageous during the day, according to a behavioural study led by researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development. (2018-09-21)
Heart disease common among firefighters who die of cardiac arrest
The majority of firefighters who died from cardiac arrest had autopsy confirmed evidence of coronary artery disease, or narrowing of the arteries, and structural abnormalities, including an enlarged heart and increased wall thickness of the primary chamber for pumping blood, or left ventricle. (2018-09-05)
Natural 'breakdown' of chemicals predicts lung damage in 9/11 firefighters
Abnormal levels of more than two dozen metabolites -- chemicals produced in the body as it breaks down fats, proteins and carbohydrates -- can reliably predict which Sept. (2018-09-03)
Emergency resuscitation device increases cardiac arrest survival rate, study reports
When paramedics resuscitated cardiac arrest patients with a new type of breathing tube, their patients were more likely to survive, according to a University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston-led study in today's JAMA. (2018-08-28)
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