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Current Firefighters News and Events, Firefighters News Articles.
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'Fire inversions' lock smoke in valleys
There's an atmospheric feedback loop, says University of Utah atmospheric scientist Adam Kochanski, that can lock smoke in valleys in much the same way that temperature inversions lock the smog and gunk in the Salt Lake Valley each winter. (2019-09-12)
Is exposure to world trade center disaster associated with cardiovascular disease risk for NY firefighters
A study of nearly 9,800 Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) male firefighters suggests an association between greater exposure to the World Trade Center disaster and long-term cardiovascular disease risk, while the results of other studies have been mixed. (2019-09-06)
9/11 World Trade Center exposure linked to heart disease among NYC firefighters
A study of New York City firefighters finds that exposure to 9/11 World Trade Center (WTC) dust is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). (2019-09-06)
Natural 'breakdown' of chemicals may guard against lung damage in 9/11 first responders
The presence of chemicals made as the body breaks down fats, proteins, and carbohydrates can predict whether Sept. (2019-09-03)
Police less proactive after negative public scrutiny, study says
Public safety officers know that their profession could draw them into the line of fire at any moment, as it did recently for six officers wounded in a shooting standoff in Philadelphia. (2019-08-19)
Recognizing kidney injury due to burns is improved by artificial intelligence
Many burn victims suffer acute kidney injury, but early recognition of the condition can be challenging. (2019-07-12)
Exposure to others' suffering even worse than being shot at
War veterans who were not personally in life-threatening danger have more psychological problems than those who were injured by gunfire, according to a study that surveyed Norwegian veterans after their return from Afghanistan. (2019-06-21)
Burnout: Sleepless firefighters at risk of exhaustion and mental health conditions
Sleep disturbances and mental health challenges are putting close to half of America's firefighters at high risk of emotional fatigue and exhaustion, new research by Monash University in Australia shows. (2019-06-20)
Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration
On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. (2019-06-19)
Female firefighters more likely to suffer PTSD, contemplate suicide
Female firefighters are fighting for their mental health as they perform their grueling duties. (2019-05-21)
Sex sells: how masculinity is used as currency to buy sperm donors' time
Sperm banks in the United Kingdom and Australia use images and phrases associated with masculinity to attract donors because laws prohibit them from paying for sperm. (2019-05-20)
Drexel-developed safety climate scale helps fire departments reach safety goals
A new safety scale, that effectively measures the safety climate of a fire department, has been developed by researchers from Drexel's Dornsife School of Public Health, according to a paper published today in the journal Safety Science. (2019-05-16)
Fire-safety sectors call for global PFAS ban, no loopholes for toxic firefighting foam
Fluorinated firefighting foam is a leading cause of PFAS water contamination and is associated with cancer and endocrine disruption. (2019-05-01)
Predicting the uphill battle
For wildland firefighters retreating from the fire to a safety zone, predicting how long it takes to move across terrain can be a matter of life and death. (2019-04-03)
Marine protected reserves do more than restore fish
In a new analysis of the effectiveness of marine protected areas worldwide, University of Massachusetts Amherst marine ecologist Brian Cheng and colleagues report that reserves not only replenish target fish populations, they also restore ecological functioning. (2019-04-01)
Handshakes or contracts?
A new study of US fire departments has found improvements differ for property damage and personal injuries or deaths, depending on whether the collaborations were informal, formal, or based on formal contracts without any prior history of working together. (2019-03-25)
Tracking firefighters in burning buildings
McMaster researchers, working with partners at other universities, have created a motion-powered, fireproof sensor that can track the movements of firefighters, steelworkers, miners and others who work in high-risk environments where they cannot always be seen. (2019-03-01)
Federal fire grant spending could be more balanced, new model suggests
The federal government considers many factors when spending money to prevent structure fires. (2019-02-25)
Push-up capacity linked with lower incidence of cardiovascular disease events among men
Active, middle-aged men able to complete more than 40 push-ups had a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes -- including diagnoses of coronary artery disease and major events such as heart failure -- during 10 years of follow-up compared with those who were able to do less than 10 push-ups during the baseline exam. (2019-02-15)
Fort McMurray homes have normal levels of indoor toxins, U of T Engineering study reveals
U of T Engineering researchers have examined dust from homes in Fort McMurray, Alta., for evidence of harmful toxins left in the aftermath of the devastating 2016 wildfire. (2019-01-14)
Hoosier firefighters face higher risk of dying from cancer than non-firefighters
Hoosier firefighters face a significantly higher risk of dying from cancer than non-firefighters in Indiana, according to a study that shows death from malignant cancers was the leading cause of death for Indiana firefighters between 1985 and 2013. (2018-12-03)
Light pollution makes fish more courageous
Artificial light at night also makes guppies more courageous during the day, according to a behavioural study led by researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development. (2018-09-21)
Heart disease common among firefighters who die of cardiac arrest
The majority of firefighters who died from cardiac arrest had autopsy confirmed evidence of coronary artery disease, or narrowing of the arteries, and structural abnormalities, including an enlarged heart and increased wall thickness of the primary chamber for pumping blood, or left ventricle. (2018-09-05)
Natural 'breakdown' of chemicals predicts lung damage in 9/11 firefighters
Abnormal levels of more than two dozen metabolites -- chemicals produced in the body as it breaks down fats, proteins and carbohydrates -- can reliably predict which Sept. (2018-09-03)
Emergency resuscitation device increases cardiac arrest survival rate, study reports
When paramedics resuscitated cardiac arrest patients with a new type of breathing tube, their patients were more likely to survive, according to a University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston-led study in today's JAMA. (2018-08-28)
California's Mendocino complex of fires now largest in state's history
California has been dealing with record breaking fires for the past month and they aren't even halfway through their fire season. (2018-08-07)
People process bad news better under stress
Threat dissolves the human tendency to readily accept good news over bad, according to experiments conducted both in the lab and with on-duty firefighters. (2018-08-06)
Stress makes people better at processing bad news
Feeling stressed or anxious makes people more able to process and internalise bad news, finds a new UCL-led study. (2018-08-06)
Rice University study: How firefighters and others take leaps of faith
A study of firefighters in the United States breaks new ground in understanding how groups of workers -- especially those in high-risk occupations -- are able to take leaps of faith. (2018-08-01)
Raging fires in California creating havoc for the state
Fires across California are creating havoc statewide with homes being destroyed, people displaced, and huge amounts of noxious smoke being propelled into the atmosphere. (2018-07-31)
New model quantifies communities' vulnerability to the spread of fire
Disaster-mitigation experts in Colorado State University's Walter Scott, Jr. College of Engineering wanted to bring attention to the complexity of the so-called wildland-urban interface of fires. (2018-07-12)
UTHealth researcher reveals results of study on emergency breathing tubes
In a landmark study, researchers found that patients treated with paramedic oxygen delivery using a newer, more flexible laryngeal breathing tube may have a greater survival rate after sudden cardiac arrest than the traditional intubation breathing tube. (2018-05-16)
Understanding steam burns
Even if the wound looks superficially harmless, steam burns must be cooled persistently. (2018-05-14)
Researchers clarify the identity of brain stem cells
The human nervous system is a complex structure that sends electrical signals from the brain to the rest of the body, enabling us to move and think. (2018-05-04)
This is not a game: NIST virtual reality aims to win for public safety
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) now aim to make virtual reality simulations more of a reality for first responders, enabling firefighters, law enforcement officers and others to learn and practice how to best operate and communicate in emergencies. (2018-05-04)
Two studies, editorial report on cancer risk for firefighters at World Trade Center disaster
Two studies and a related editorial report on cancer risk for firefighters with the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) exposed to the wreckage of the World Trade Center during rescue and recovery work following the attacks on Sept. (2018-04-26)
Blood cancer precursor found in 9/11 firefighters
A study in today's issue of JAMA Oncology reports that New York City firefighters exposed to the 9/11 World Trade Center disaster site face an increased risk for developing myeloma precursor disease (MGUS), which can lead to the blood cancer multiple myeloma. (2018-04-26)
Mass. public safety, public health agencies collaborate to address the opioid epidemic
A new study shows that public health and public safety agencies established local, collaborative programs in Massachusetts to connect overdose survivors and their personal networks with addiction treatment, harm reduction, and other community support services following a non-fatal overdose. (2018-02-14)
Untimely immune cell clocks may contribute to obesity and diabetes in shift workers
About 15 million Americans don't have a typical nine-to-five workday, and many of these -- nurses, firefighters and flight attendants, among many other professions -- may see their schedule change drastically one week to the next. (2018-02-06)
Vaccines not protecting farmed fish from disease
The vaccines used by commercial fish farmers are not protecting fish from disease, according to a new study. (2018-01-22)
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