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Current Fish species News and Events

Current Fish species News and Events, Fish species News Articles.
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Keep quiet or be eliminated: How cell competition modulates morphogen gradients
Tissue patterning is an important process during embryo formation, which ensures that groups of cells are arranged in an appropriate manner that allows them to function properly. (2019-10-23)
Fish more tolerant than expected to low oxygen events
Fish may be more tolerant than previously thought to periods of low oxygen in the oceans, new research shows. (2019-10-22)
Scientists discovered mechanisms that protect tapeworms from being digested by their host
A team of scientists from Tyumen together with colleagues found and described previously unknown tapeworm proteins that suppress the activity of trypsin and efficiently protect the parasites from being digested inside a host's intestinal tract. (2019-10-22)
Are humans changing animal genetic diversity worldwide?
Human population density and land use is causing changes in animal genetic diversity, according to researchers at McGill University. (2019-10-22)
New species take longer to arise in the Amazon
Amazonia is home to the greatest number of species on earth, many now threatened, but a new study published Oct. (2019-10-22)
Poor water conditions drive invasive snakeheads onto land
In a new study published Oct. 21, 2019 in the peer-reviewed journal Integrative Organismal Biology, Wake Forest researcher Noah Bressman reported for the first time the water conditions that could drive snakeheads onto land. (2019-10-22)
Fish pass 'hot genes' onto their grandchildren
Fish that are able to survive and adjust to warming waters may pass heat-tolerant genes not just onto their children, but their grandchildren too. (2019-10-22)
Underwater grandmothers reveal big population of lethal sea snakes
A group of snorkelling grandmothers is helping scientists better understand marine ecology by photographing venomous sea snakes in waters off the city of Noumea, New Caledonia. (2019-10-22)
Schools of molecular 'fish' could improve display screens
Researchers are using a type of material called liquid crystals to create incredibly small, swirling schools of 'fish.' (2019-10-21)
Forests on the radar
With freely available radar data from satellites, biodiversity in forests can be analysed very well. (2019-10-21)
How do ketogenic diets affect skin inflammation?
Not all fats are equal in how they affect our skin, according to a new study in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, published by Elsevier. (2019-10-17)
Old friends and new enemies: How evolutionary history can predict insect invader impacts
A team led by the University of Washington has developed a model that could help foresters predict which nonnative insect invasions will be most problematic. (2019-10-17)
Pitt study: Sexual selection alone could spark formation of new species
Because of imprinted preferences, strawberry poison frog females mate more with similar colored males, and less with differently colored males. (2019-10-17)
Phylogenetic analysis forces rethink of termite evolution
Despite their important ecological role as decomposers, termites are often overlooked in research. (2019-10-17)
First scientific description of elusive bird illuminates plight of Borneo's forests
Scientists with the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and collaborators surveying the birdlife of Borneo have discovered a startling surprise: an undescribed species of bird, which has been named the spectacled flowerpecker. (2019-10-17)
Scientists discover new species of wasp-mimicking praying mantis
Cleveland Museum of Natural History Director of Research and Collections Dr. (2019-10-17)
Industrial melanism linked to same gene in 3 moth species
The rise of dark forms of many species of moth in heavily polluted areas of 19th and 20th century Britain, known as industrial melanism, was a highly visible response to environmental change. (2019-10-17)
Museums put ancient DNA to work for wildlife
Scientists who are trying to save species at the brink of extinction are finding help in an unexpected place. (2019-10-17)
The composition of species is changing in ecosystems across the globe
While the identities of species in local assemblages are undergoing significant changes, their average number is relatively constant. (2019-10-17)
Global biodiversity crisis is a large-scale reorganization, with greatest loss in tropical oceans
Local biodiversity of species -- the scale on which humans feel contributions from biodiversity -- is being rapidly reorganized, according to a new global analysis of biodiversity data from more than 200 studies, together representing all major biomes. (2019-10-17)
New study uncovers 'magnetic' memory of European glass eels
A new study led by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and at the Institute of Marine Research in Norway found that European glass eels use their magnetic sense to 'imprint' a memory of the direction of water currents in the estuary where they become juveniles. (2019-10-17)
What gives a 3-meter-long Amazonian fish some of the toughest scales on Earth
Arapaima gigas is a big fish in a bigger river full of piranhas, but that doesn't mean it's an easy meal. (2019-10-16)
Galapagos study highlights importance of biodiversity in the face of climate change
Study of wave turbulence suggests that highly mobile species and more diverse ecological communities may be more resilient to the effects of changing environmental conditions. (2019-10-16)
3-D printed coral could help endangered reefs
Threats to coral reefs are everywhere--rising water temperatures, ocean acidification, coral bleaching, fishing and other human activities. (2019-10-16)
Study helps pinpoint what makes species vulnerable to environmental change
Researchers from Princeton University affiliated with PEI reported that a bird species' ability to adapt to seasonal temperature changes may be one factor in whether it can better withstand environmental disruption. (2019-10-16)
Human medicines affect fish behavior
Human medicines that act on important signal systems in the brain make fish bolder, shows a new study on three-spined sticklebacks by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden. (2019-10-16)
Rare 'itinerant breeding' behavior revealed in California bird
Only two bird species have ever been shown to undertake what scientists call 'itinerant breeding': nesting in one area, migrating to another region, and nesting again there within the same year, to take advantage of shifting food resources. (2019-10-15)
RUDN University veterinarians developed a way to protect carp from the harmful effects of ammonia
Veterinarians from RUDN University have developed a way to increase the resistance of carp, the most common fish in fish farms, to the harmful effects of ammonia, which is found in almost all water bodies. (2019-10-15)
Dynamic pattern of Skyrmions observed
Tiny magnetic vortices known as skyrmions form in certain magnetic materials, such as Cu2OSeO3. (2019-10-15)
Peeping into the black box of AI to discover how collective behaviors emerge
For decades, scientists seeking to explain the emergence of complex group behaviors, such as schooling in fish, have been divided into two camps. (2019-10-15)
The brain does not follow the head
The human brain is about three times the size of the brains of great apes. (2019-10-15)
Piranha fish swap old teeth for new simultaneously
With the help of new technologies, a team led by the University of Washington has confirmed that piranhas lose and regrow all the teeth on one side of their face multiple times throughout their lives. (2019-10-15)
Resurrection of 50,000-year-old gene reveals how malaria jumped from gorillas to humans
For the first time, scientists have uncovered the likely series of events that led to the world's deadliest malaria parasite being able to jump from gorillas to humans. (2019-10-15)
Two new porcelain crab species discovered
Two new symbiotic porcelain crab species have been described. One of them, from the South China Sea of Vietnam, inhabits the compact tube-like shelters built by the polychaete worm with other organisms. (2019-10-15)
Investing in love and affection pays off for species that mate for life
A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by biologists at the University of Chicago and the University of North Carolina explains how sexual cooperation and bonding evolves in bird species that form pair bonds. (2019-10-14)
The makeup of mariculture: FSU researchers examine global trends in seafood farming
The process of farming seafood in the ocean, known as mariculture, is a growing trend yet little is known about the trajectories of its development. (2019-10-14)
The impact of human-caused noise pollution on birds
Anthropogenic noise pollution (ANP) is a globally invasive phenomenon impacting natural systems, but most research has occurred at local scales with few species. (2019-10-11)
New tool enables Nova Scotia lobster fishery to address impacts of climate change
Researchers use long-term survey data sets and climate models to help fishing communities plan for a warmer ocean. (2019-10-11)
Mechanism regulating species coexistence in a subtropical forest revealed
A research group led by Prof. MA Keping from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Maryland, College Park and the Institute of Microbiology, have now revealed the underlying mechanism regulating species coexistence in a subtropical forest. (2019-10-09)
A unique study sheds light on the ecology of the glacial relict amphipod Gammaracanthus lacustris
The glacial relict amphipod Gammaracanthus lacustris only occurs in deep and cold waters. (2019-10-09)
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