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Current Fisheries News and Events

Current Fisheries News and Events, Fisheries News Articles.
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Impact of climate change on tropical fisheries would create ripples across the world
Seafood is the most highly traded food commodity globally, with tropical zone marine fisheries contributing more than 50% of the global fish catch, an average of $USD 96 billion annually. (2020-08-06)
Identifying and contending with radioisotopes of concern at Fukushima
In this Perspective, Ken Buesseler describes the enormous challenges that remain in doing clean-up on land in Japan following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster in 2011, even as some progress has been made offshore. (2020-08-06)
Ocean heatwaves dramatically shift habitats
Marine heatwaves across the world's oceans can displace habitat for sea turtles, whales, and other marine life by 10s to thousands of kilometers. (2020-08-05)
A framework for the future
As the population grows, and the global standard of living improves, humanity's appetite for seafood is increasing. (2020-08-03)
Popular seafood species in sharp decline around the world
The first-ever global study of long-term trends in the population biomass of exploited marine fish and invertebrates for all coastal areas on the planet. (2020-07-21)
Fish reef domes a boon for environment, recreational fishing
Manmade reefs can be used in conjunction with the restoration or protection of natural habitat to increase fish abundance in estuaries, UNSW researchers have found. (2020-07-16)
Industry-made pits are beneficial for beavers and wolverines, study shows
Beavers and wolverines in Northern Alberta are using industry-created borrow pits as homes and feeding grounds, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists. (2020-07-16)
Scientists identify new species of sea sponge off the coast of British Columbia, Canada
A UAlberta research team has published a study on the discovery of a new sponge that is abundant in the region, making up nearly 20 per cent of the live sponges in the reefs off the coast of British Columbia. (2020-07-16)
Study first to show tiger sharks' travels and desired hangouts in the Gulf of Mexico
From 2010 to 2018, scientists tagged 56 tiger sharks of varying life stages to track their movements via satellite. (2020-07-15)
Social media inspired models show winter warming hits fish stocks
Mathematical modelling inspired by social media is identifying the significant impacts of warming seas on the world's fisheries. (2020-07-13)
COVID-19 and Brexit can help with the recovery of UK fish stocks
The United Kingdom has a unique opportunity to start rebuilding its fish stocks by taking advantage of the slowdown in commercial fishing caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing Brexit negotiations, new research has shown. (2020-07-13)
Chinook salmon declines related to changes in freshwater conditions
A new University of Alaska-led study provides the first evidence that declines in many of Alaska's chinook salmon populations can be attributed in part to climate-driven changes in their freshwater habitats. (2020-07-09)
Bleaching affects aquarium corals, too
A world-first study examines the temperature thresholds of Australian aquarium corals and finds they are at risk under climate change. (2020-06-29)
You are what you eat is as important for fish as it is for people
There is truth in the saying 'you are what you eat'; even more so if you are a salmon or herring swimming off the British Columbia coast, a recent University of British Columbia study discovered. (2020-06-08)
Measuring Atlantic bluefin tuna with a drone
Researchers have used an unmanned aerial system (or drone) to gather data on schooling juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna in the Gulf of Maine. (2020-06-05)
American lobster, sea scallop habitat could shift off the northeast
Researchers have projected significant changes in the habitat of commercially important American lobster and sea scallops on the Northeast U.S. continental shelf. (2020-06-05)
Fish feces reveals which species eat crown-of-thorns
Crown-of-thorns starfish are on the menu for many more fish species than previously suspected, an investigation using fish poo and gut goo reveals. (2020-05-18)
Large rockfish leave Chesapeake Bay to become ocean migrators; smaller fish remain
A new electronic tagging study of 100 Potomac River striped bass sheds light on rockfish migration in Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Coast. (2020-05-14)
'Pingers' could save porpoises from fishing nets
Underwater sound devices called 'pingers' could be an effective, long-term way to prevent porpoises getting caught in fishing nets with no negative behavioural effects, newly published research suggests. (2020-05-13)
Fishing can disrupt mating systems
In many fish species body size plays an important role in sexual selection. (2020-05-08)
Oceans should have a place in climate 'green new deal' policies, scientists suggest
The world's oceans play a critical role in climate regulation, mitigation and adaptation and should be integrated into comprehensive 'green new deal' proposals being promoted by elected officials and agency policymakers. (2020-05-05)
URI professor: Climate change increases risk of fisheries conflict
A team of experts, led by a University of Rhode Island researcher, examined how climate change is affecting the ocean environment and found that the changing conditions will likely result in increased fisheries-related conflicts and create new challenges in the management of global fisheries. (2020-05-04)
Magnetic pulses alter salmon's orientation, suggesting navigation via magnetite in tissue
Researchers have taken a step closer to solving one of nature's most remarkable mysteries: How do salmon, when it's time to spawn, find their way back from distant ocean locations to the stream where they hatched? (2020-05-02)
Ocean acidification prediction now possible years in advance
CU Boulder researchers have developed a method that could enable scientists to accurately forecast ocean acidity up to five years in advance. (2020-05-01)
Learn from past to protect oceans
History holds valuable lessons -- and stark warnings -- about how to manage fisheries and other ocean resources, a new study says. (2020-04-24)
Warming climate undoes decades of knowledge of marine protected areas
A new study highlights that tropical coral reef marine reserves can offer little defence in the face of climate change impacts. (2020-04-24)
Assessing El Niño's impact on fisheries and aquaculture around the world
New report presents the main regional consequences caused by the five types of the climate pattern. (2020-04-24)
Poor coastal hypoxia and acidification policy leaves marine fisheries at risk
Current regulatory standards regarding the dissolved oxygen and pH levels of coastal waters have not kept pace with the scientific understanding of hypoxia and acidification, nor with the mounting evidence of their negative impact on coastal marine life. (2020-04-23)
Fishers livelihood measured by more than catch
Scientists throwing shade on the idea that a fisher's life is Zen, showing the arrangements before and after the fish takes the bait the must be considered to make effective and equitable policy about global fishing. (2020-04-23)
Climate change's toll on freshwater fish: A new database for science
The Fish and Climate Change Database -- or FiCli (pronounced ''fick-lee'') -- is a searchable directory of peer-reviewed journal publications that describe projected or documented effects of climate change on inland fishes. (2020-04-22)
More protections needed to safeguard biodiversity in the Southern Ocean
Current marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean need to be at least doubled to adequately safeguard the biodiversity of the Antarctic, according to a new CU Boulder study. (2020-04-22)
Return of 'the Blob' could intensify climate change impacts on Northeast Pacific fisheries
A large marine heatwave would double the rate of the climate change impacts on fisheries species in the northeast Pacific by 2050, says a recently released study by researchers from the University of British Columbia and University of Bern. (2020-04-21)
Meeting multiple management goals to maximize coral reef health
While management strategies can be effective at achieving reef fisheries' conservation goals, a new study reveals how increased human pressure makes conservation of coral reef biodiversity truly difficult to achieve. (2020-04-16)
Can coral reefs 'have it all'?
A new study outlines how strategic placement of no-fishing marine reserves can help coral reef fish communities thrive. (2020-04-16)
First Gulf-wide survey of oil pollution completed 10 years after Deepwater Horizon
Since the 2010 BP oil spill, marine scientists at the University of South Florida (USF) have sampled more than 2,500 individual fish representing 91 species from 359 locations across the Gulf of Mexico and found evidence of oil exposure in all of them, including some of the most popular types of seafood. (2020-04-15)
New information about the transmission of the amphibian pathogen, Bsal
Using existing data from controlled experiments and computer simulations, researchers with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture have found that host contact rates and habitat structure affect transmission rates of Bsal among eastern newts, a common salamander species found throughout eastern North America. (2020-04-08)
Study reveals strongest predictors of menhaden growth in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic
New research suggests that large-scale environmental factors influence the size of one of the ocean's most abundant forage species. (2020-04-08)
Artificial light in the arctic
A new study examine how artificial light during the polar night disrupts Arctic fish and zooplankton behavior down to 200 meters in depth, which could affect fish counts. (2020-04-06)
Study shows six decades of change in plankton communities
New research published in Global Change Biology shows that some species have experienced a 75% population decrease in the past 60 years, while others are more than twice as abundant due to rises in sea surface temperatures. (2020-04-01)
Reef manta rays in New Caledonia dive up to 672 meters deep at night
The first data collected on the diving behavior of reef manta rays in New Caledonia considerably extend the known depth range for this vulnerable species in decline, according to a study published March 18 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hugo Lassauce of the University of New Caledonia, and colleagues. (2020-03-18)
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