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Current Fisheries News and Events

Current Fisheries News and Events, Fisheries News Articles.
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New information about the transmission of the amphibian pathogen, Bsal
Using existing data from controlled experiments and computer simulations, researchers with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture have found that host contact rates and habitat structure affect transmission rates of Bsal among eastern newts, a common salamander species found throughout eastern North America. (2020-04-08)
Study reveals strongest predictors of menhaden growth in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic
New research suggests that large-scale environmental factors influence the size of one of the ocean's most abundant forage species. (2020-04-08)
Artificial light in the arctic
A new study examine how artificial light during the polar night disrupts Arctic fish and zooplankton behavior down to 200 meters in depth, which could affect fish counts. (2020-04-06)
Study shows six decades of change in plankton communities
New research published in Global Change Biology shows that some species have experienced a 75% population decrease in the past 60 years, while others are more than twice as abundant due to rises in sea surface temperatures. (2020-04-01)
Reef manta rays in New Caledonia dive up to 672 meters deep at night
The first data collected on the diving behavior of reef manta rays in New Caledonia considerably extend the known depth range for this vulnerable species in decline, according to a study published March 18 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hugo Lassauce of the University of New Caledonia, and colleagues. (2020-03-18)
Brand new shark(s), doo doo, doo doo doo doo
Two new species of sawsharks discovered in the West Indian Ocean reinforces how much we still don't know about life in the ocean and the impact climate change is having on it. (2020-03-18)
Against overfishing: save the oldies!
Measures against overfishing tend to protect young, immature fish through measures such as minimum-landing sizes. (2020-03-16)
Climate change could threaten sea snails in mid-Atlantic waters
Climate change could threaten the survival and development of common whelk -- a type of sea snail -- in the mid-Atlantic region, according to a study led by scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. (2020-03-11)
West coast dungeness crab stable or increasing even with intensive harvest, research shows
Fishermen from California to Washington caught almost all the available legal-size male Dungeness crab each year in the last few decades. (2020-03-06)
Satellite data boosts understanding of climate change's effects on kelp
Tapping into 35 years of satellite imagery, researchers have dramatically enlarged the database regarding how climate change is affecting kelps, near-shore seaweeds that provide food and shelter for fish and protect coastlines from wave damage. (2020-03-05)
Fisherwomen contribute tonnes of fish, billions of dollars to global fisheries
Fishing (particularly commercial fishing) is considered a male-dominated realm but it turns out that the 3 million tonnes of fish per year that women catch add up to $5.6 billion or the equivalent of 12% of the landed value of all small-scale fisheries catches globally. (2020-03-04)
Billions lost as illicit fisheries trade hurting nations who can afford it least
More than eight million to 14 million tonnes of unreported fish catches are traded illicitly every year, costing the legitimate market between $9 billion and $17 billion in trade each year, according to new UBC research. (2020-02-26)
Scientists call on government to increase ambition to save our ocean
A team of marine scientists from across the UK, led by the Marine Conservation Research Group at the University of Plymouth, has called on the Government to increase its ambition to save the oceans by overhauling its approach to marine conservation management. (2020-02-25)
Spinal deformities in Sacramento-San Joaquin delta fish linked to toxic mineral selenium
Native fish discovered with spinal deformities in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in 2011 were exposed to high levels of selenium from their parents and food they ate as juveniles in the San Joaquin River, new research has found. (2020-02-24)
As oceans warm, fish flee
New research shows that nations in the tropics are especially vulnerable to the loss of fish species due to climate change. (2020-02-24)
Why do whales migrate? They return to the tropics to shed their skin, scientists say
Whales undertake some of the longest migrations on earth, often swimming many thousands of miles, over many months, to breed in the tropics. (2020-02-21)
Illuminating interactions between decision-making and the environment
Employing a game theory model, University of Pennsylvania researchers demonstrate how strategic decisions influence the environment in which those decisions are made, alterations which in turn influence strategy. (2020-02-19)
Oversight of fishing vessels lacking, new analysis shows
Policies regulating fishing in international waters do not sufficiently protect officials who monitor illegal fishing, the prohibited dumping of equipment, or human trafficking or other human rights abuses, finds a new analysis by a team of environmental researchers. (2020-02-18)
East African fish in need of recovery
A study of East African coral reefs has uncovered an unfolding calamity for the region: plummeting fish populations due to overfishing, which in turn could produce widespread food insecurity. (2020-02-06)
Alaska's national forests contribute 48 million salmon a year to state's fishing industry
Alaska's Tongass and Chugach National Forests, which contain some of the world's largest remaining tracts of intact temperate rainforest, contribute an average of 48 million salmon a year to the state's commercial fishing industry, a new USDA Forest Service-led study has found. (2020-02-06)
Colossal oysters have disappeared from Florida's 'most pristine' coastlines
Oysters have gotten smaller, resulting in economic and environmental concerns. (2020-02-05)
Updated shark tagging atlas provides more than 50 years of tagging and recapture data
A citizen science program more than 50 years old has shed new light on the movements and distribution patterns of 35 species of Atlantic sharks. (2020-01-31)
The Global Reef Expedition: Kingdom of Tonga
The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation has published their findings from extensive coral reef surveys conducted in the Kingdom of Tonga. (2020-01-29)
Study connects marine heat wave with spike in whale entanglements
Climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of marine heat waves -- warm water anomalies that disrupt marine ecosystems -- and this is creating new challenges for fisheries management and ocean conservation. (2020-01-27)
'Blob' research shows ecological effects that halted fishing and hiked whale entanglements
An ecological pileup of unprecedented changes in the ocean off the West Coast beginning about 2014 led to record entanglements of humpback and other whales, putting the region's most valuable commercial fishery at risk, new research shows. (2020-01-27)
Recreational fishers catching more sharks and rays
Recreational fishers are increasingly targeting sharks and rays, a situation that is causing concern among researchers. (2020-01-27)
A model ecosystem fish story
Have I got a fish story for you. Any angler beginning a yarn like that usually ends up spinning a tall tale, an exaggeration or bald-faced lie. (2020-01-21)
Neither fishing tales nor sailor's yarn
An international team led by Robert Arlinghaus from the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries and the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin have developed a method for combining the empirical knowledge of fishery stakeholders in such a way that the result corresponds to the best scientific understanding. (2020-01-14)
Fisheries management is actually working, global analysis shows
Nearly half of the fish caught worldwide are from stocks that are scientifically monitored and, on average, are increasing in abundance. (2020-01-13)
New study reveals international movements of Atlantic tarpon, need for protection
MIAMI--The results of an 18-year study of Atlantic tarpon by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science revealed that these large silvery fish take extensive seasonal migrations--1,000s of kilometers in distance--beyond US borders. (2020-01-13)
eDNA expands species surveys to capture a more complete picture
Tiny bits of DNA collected from waters off the West Coast allowed scientists to identify more species of marine vertebrates than traditional surveys with trawl nets. (2019-12-31)
Easy prey: The largest bears in the world use small streams to fatten up on salmon
A new study reveals a different picture of how and when brown bears in southwestern Alaska eat salmon. (2019-12-19)
Seasonal forecasts challenged by Pacific Ocean warming
Research has found global warming will make it more difficult to predict multi-year global climate variations, a consequence of changes to long-term climate variability patterns in the Pacific Ocean. (2019-12-17)
Tiny shells reveal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean
In first-of-its-kind research, NOAA scientists and academic partners used 100 years of microscopic shells to show that the coastal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean average -- with the seafood supply in the crosshairs. (2019-12-16)
Salmon lose diversity in managed rivers, reducing resilience to environmental change
The manipulation of rivers in California is jeopardizing the resilience of native Chinook salmon. (2019-12-13)
Study to help manage shark populations in Pacific Panama
A study in Pacific Panama identifies 11 potential nursery areas of locally common and migratory sharks, which could support shark conservation efforts in the region. (2019-12-11)
Killer whale grandmothers boost survival of calves
The study found that grandmothers who were no longer able to reproduce had the biggest beneficial impact on the survival chances of their grand-offspring. (2019-12-09)
New England fishermen losing jobs due to climate
For decades the biggest threat to the industry has been overfishing, but it is no longer the only threat. (2019-12-09)
Lights on fishing nets save turtles and dolphins
Placing lights on fishing nets reduces the chances of sea turtles and dolphins being caught by accident, new research shows. (2019-12-05)
Fish size affects snake river salmon returns more than route through dams
The survival and eventual return of juvenile Snake River salmon and steelhead to spawning streams as adults depends more on their size than the way they pass through hydroelectric dams on their migration to the ocean, new research shows. (2019-11-25)
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