Current Fisheries News and Events

Current Fisheries News and Events, Fisheries News Articles.
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Waste fishing gear threatens Ganges wildlife
Waste fishing gear in the River Ganges poses a threat to wildlife including otters, turtles and dolphins, new research shows. (2020-11-25)

Study in Thailand identifies benefits of community-based freshwater fish reserves
Freshwater fish reserves are extraordinarily successful at protecting multiple species of fish, a new study of a network of community-based reserves in Thailand has found. Aaron Koning, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Nevada, Reno's Global Water Center, spent seven years studying a network of freshwater protected areas (fish reserves) that communities established in one branch of the Salween River Basin in northern Thailand. (2020-11-25)

Community conservation reserves protect fish diversity in tropical rivers
A collaboration between researchers from Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison has found that small, community-based reserves in Thailand's Salween River Basin are serving as critical refuges for fish diversity in a region whose subsistence fisheries have suffered from decades of overharvesting. (2020-11-25)

Not just lizards - alligators can regrow their tails too
A team of researchers from Arizona State University and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries have uncovered that young alligators have the ability to regrow their tails up to three-quarters of a foot, or 18% of their total body length. (2020-11-23)

US seafood industry flounders due to COVID-19
The pandemic is putting a hurt on the seafood industry, finds the largest study of COVID on US fisheries, suggesting that fishmongers may flounder -- or go belly up -- without government aid. Compared to last year: -Monthly fresh seafood exports declined up to 43% -Monthly imports fell up to 37% -Catches dropped 40% some months. Over the first six months of 2020: -U.S. seafood exports are down 20% -Imports are down 6% -Further losses likely as restrictions increase to address C-19.OVID (2020-11-23)

Shocks to seafood
The United States' seafood industry declined precipitously in the months following the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, and research shows that targeted federal assistance will be necessary to bring it back. (2020-11-23)

How fishermen have adapted to change over the past 35+ years
An analysis published in Fish and Fisheries notes that marine fisheries are increasingly exposed to external drivers of social and ecological change, and recent changes have had different impacts upon the livelihood strategies favored by fishermen based on the size of their boats. (2020-11-18)

Study finds some sport fish are caught repeatedly - which may throw off population count
A new study reports that, for several species of oceanic sport fish, individual fish that are caught, released and recaught are more likely to be caught again than scientists anticipated. The findings raise some interesting questions for policy makers tasked with preserving sustainable fisheries. (2020-11-17)

Seafood mislabeling is having negative impacts on the marine environment
As the most globally traded food commodity, seafood production and its supply chains are often complex and opaque. Contemporaneous with the increase in seafood consumption, evidence of mislabeling has become ubiquitous. Yet, little is known about the consequences of seafood mislabeling. New research by Advanced Conservation Strategies and colleagues show that conditions exist for mislabeling to generate negative impacts on marine populations and to support consumption of products from poorly managed fisheries. (2020-11-16)

Spiny dogfish eat Atlantic cod: DNA may provide some answers
As dogfish populations recover from overfishing, questions remain about how much Atlantic cod they are eating and its impact on the struggling cod population. Researchers at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center used innovative genetic techniques to help shed some light on the situation. (2020-11-16)

COVID-delayed Arctic research cruise yields late-season data
Researchers studying the Bering and Chukchi seas for three weeks in October found no ice and a surprisingly active ecosystem as they added another year's data to a key climate change record. The research vessel Norseman II carried scientists from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and Clark University. (2020-11-11)

Global fisheries could alleviate a global food emergency in extreme situations
A new international study argues that, if managed sustainably in advance, global fisheries could alleviate food shortages even after a nuclear war. (2020-11-09)

Workshop collaboration aims to move tidal marsh research forward
Tidal marshes play a significant role in coastal ecosystems. They are a nursery ground for juvenile fishes and a line of defense in coastal erosion. However, there is still a great deal not known about tidal marshes. In November 2019, 65 scientists, managers, and restoration practitioners converged at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab to see where tidal marsh research has been and where it needs to go. (2020-11-09)

After election: making the endangered species act more effective
Following the presidential election, a leading group of scientists are making the case that a 'rule reversal' will not be sufficient to allow the Endangered Species Act to do its job. Instead, they're calling for deeper improvements to the rules federal wildlife agencies use to apply the law--aiming to make the Act more effective and to gain bipartisan and industry support in an era of accelerating climate change. (2020-11-05)

Large-scale study: Congolese fishermen report decline in fish stocks on Lake Tanganyika
Fishermen working on Lake Tanganyika in eastern Congo experience a lack of safety and want better enforcement of existing regulations. They also report a decline in the lake's fish stocks. These are some of the findings of a large international study led by KU Leuven (Belgium) based on 1018 interviews with stakeholders in the area. The study was published in the Journal of Great Lakes Research. (2020-11-04)

DNA in seawater can reveal fish diversity in the deep ocean
A new study demonstrates the effectiveness of a novel method for using DNA in seawater samples to determine which fish species are present in a given part of the deep sea. A team of scientists from eDNAtec Inc. and colleagues from Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Memorial University present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on November 4. (2020-11-04)

Ninety years of data shows global warming impacts on foundation of marine ecosystems
Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that underpin ocean productivity and provide 50% of the world's oxygen via photosynthesis. An investigation of a 90 year data set from a coastal station offshore from Sydney provides a unique opportunity to better predict the impact of global warming on future ocean phytoplankton communities, on biodiversity and ultimately fisheries production. (2020-11-01)

Spring-run and fall-run Chinook salmon aren't as different as they seem
Historically, spring-run and fall-run Chinook salmon have been considered as separate subspecies, races, ecotypes, or even as separate species of fish. A new genetic analysis, however, shows that the timing of migration in Chinook salmon is determined entirely by differences in one short stretch of DNA in their genomes. (2020-10-29)

Simple genetics control timing of chinook salmon migration
The complex migratory traits of northern California's Chinook salmon - which have led some to regard the early- versus late-migrating fish as different species - result from a single, small gene region, researchers report. (2020-10-29)

Fish banks
Society will require more food in the coming years to feed a growing population, and seafood will likely make up a significant portion of it. At the same time, we need to conserve natural habitats to ensure the health of our oceans. It seems like a conflict is inevitable. (2020-10-28)

Leaving more big fish in the sea reduces CO2 emissions
Leaving more big fish--like tuna, sharks, mackerel and swordfish--in the sea reduces the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the Earth's atmosphere.This is because when a fish dies in the ocean it sinks to the depths and sequestrates all the carbon it contains with it. This is a form of 'blue carbon'. Big fish are about 10 to 15 percent carbon. (2020-10-28)

Endangered vaquita remain genetically healthy even in low numbers, new analysis shows
The critically endangered vaquita has survived in low numbers in its native Gulf of California for hundreds of thousands of years, a new genetic analysis has found. The study found little sign of inbreeding or other risks often associated with small populations. (2020-10-23)

Management of exploited transboundary fish stocks requires international cooperation
Marine fish species are migratory in nature and not respectful of human-made territorial boundaries, which represents a challenge for fisheries management as policies tend to focus at the national level. With an average catch of 48 million tonnes per year, and USD $77 billion in annual fishing revenue, these species support critical fisheries, and require international cooperation to manage. (2020-10-21)

Early-arriving endangered Chinook salmon take the brunt of sea lion predation
A new University of Washington and NOAA Fisheries study found that sea lions have the largest negative effect on early-arriving endangered Chinook salmon in the lower Columbia River. The results of this study will publish Oct. 18, 2020 in the Journal of Applied Ecology. (2020-10-19)

Scientists release previously unseen footage showing environmental impacts of pot fishing
The findings of research by the University of Plymouth go against previous thinking around the damage caused by pot fishing to the seabed (2020-10-13)

Study shows how climate impacts food webs, poses socioeconomic threat in Eastern Africa
For the first time, a research team has obtained high resolution sedimentary core samples from Lake Tanganyika. The samples show that high frequency variability in climate can lead to major disruptions in how the lake's food web functions. The changes could put millions of people at risk who rely on the lake for food security. The team says the findings are a critical building block toward research-informed policymaking in the Lake Tanganyika region. (2020-10-09)

Broken promises: Almost 80% of threatened species lack sufficient protection
A failure by governments to deliver on commitments under a global nature conservation treaty, the Convention on Biological Diversity, could have devastating effects. The warning comes after a consortium of scientists, led by Dr Sean Maxwell and Professor James Watson from The University of Queensland, reviewed national area-based conservation efforts, including protected areas. (2020-10-07)

For red abalone, resisting ocean acidification starts with mom
Red abalone mothers from California's North Coast give their offspring an energy boost when they're born that helps them better withstand ocean acidification compared to their captive, farmed counterparts, according to a study from the Bodega Marine Laboratory at the University of California, Davis. (2020-10-05)

Predator-prey interaction study reveals more food does not always mean more consumption
Decades of data allow researchers at the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center to look at predator-prey interactions in a different way: among multiple species throughout the water column. They have developed an unusually rich picture of who is eating whom off the Northeastern United States. (2020-09-30)

Marine biodiversity reshuffles under warmer and sea ice-free Pacific Arctic
Climate warming will alter marine community compositions as species are expected to shift poleward, significantly impacting the Arctic marine ecosystem. (2020-09-29)

Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
Feeding rates of blue mussels slow down under ocean acidification conditions, and the cause may be the slowing beat of gill cilia, similar to a known response in human lung cells. (2020-09-29)

Jellyfish with your chips?
Jellyfish could replace fish and chips on a new sustainable takeaway menu to help keep threatened species off the plate. University of Queensland researchers found 92 endangered and 11 critically endangered species of seafood were caught in oceans around the world after analysing global industrial fishing records. (2020-09-21)

Loggerhead turtles record a passing hurricane
Caught in an Atlantic hurricane, satellite-tagged loggerhead turtles changed their dive behavior and movement patterns as the storm passed. The tags also recorded changes in the environment. (2020-09-01)

New analysis reveals where marine heatwaves will intensify fastest
High-resolution ocean modelling has found the world's strongest ocean currents, which play key roles in fisheries and ocean ecosystems, will experience more intense marine heatwaves than the global average over the coming decades. (2020-08-28)

Native desert bighorn sheep in ecologically intact areas are less vulnerable to climate change
In the American Southwest, native desert bighorn sheep populations found in landscapes with minimal human disturbance, including several national parks, are less likely to be vulnerable to climate change. (2020-08-26)

Scientists catalogue shark and ray distribution in Florida lagoon
A study is the first long-term, in-depth analysis of the elasmobranch community in Florida's Indian River Lagoon and develops capacity to understand how these species may respond to further environmental changes. From 2016 to 2018, researchers caught 630 individuals of 16 species, including two critically endangered smalltooth sawfish. Results showed that many elasmobranchs use the southern Indian River Lagoon throughout their life histories and the area may serve as an important nursery habitat for multiple species. (2020-08-25)

Food from the sea
Demand for food is set to rise substantially in the coming decades, which raises a question: How well can the ocean fill the gap between current supply and future need? (2020-08-19)

Seafood could account for 25% of animal protein needed to meet increases in demand
Policy reforms and technological improvements could drive seafood production upward by as much as 75% over the next three decades, research by Oregon State University and an international collaboration suggests. (2020-08-19)

Contaminants from Mount Polley tailings spill continue to affect Quesnel lake
Natural mixing of lake waters may resuspend contaminants deposited in a catastrophic mine spill six years ago, according to a new paper led by a University of Alberta scientist. (2020-08-13)

How fish stocks will change in warming seas
New research out today highlights the future effects of climate change on important fish stocks for south-west UK fisheries. (2020-08-10)

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