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Current Fluorescent protein News and Events, Fluorescent protein News Articles.
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Molecules in urine allow doctors to monitor skin cancer
What if you could simply provide a urine sample rather than undergo a painful surgical procedure to find out if your cancer was responding to treatment? (2020-08-11)
Recipe for success -- interaction proteomics become a household item
A research team from University of Helsinki introduces a new optimised and integrated interaction proteomics protocol that combines two state-of-the art methods to allow rapid identification of protein-protein interactions and more. (2020-08-11)
Research exposes new vulnerability for SARS-CoV-2
Using nanometer-level simulations, the researchers discovered a positively charged site (known as the polybasic cleavage site) located 10 nanometers from the actual binding site on the spike protein. (2020-08-11)
Researchers find new potential treatment for prion diseases
A new study in Nucleic Acids Research suggests a possible effective treatment strategy for patients suffering from prion disease. (2020-08-10)
Nanocatalysts that remotely control chemical reactions inside living cells
POSTECH professor In Su Lee's research team develops a magnetic field-induced heating 'hollow nanoreactors'. (2020-08-09)
Success in promoting plant growth for biodiesel
Scientists of Waseda University in Japan succeeded in promoting plant growth and increasing seed yield by heterologous expression of protein from Arabidopsis (artificially modified high-speed motor protein) in Camelina sativa, which is expected as a useful plant for biodiesel. (2020-08-07)
Chemists create the brightest-ever fluorescent materials
By formulating positively charged fluorescent dyes into a new class of materials called small-molecule ionic isolation lattices (SMILES), a compound's brilliant glow can be seamlessly transferred to a solid, crystalline state, researchers report August 6 in the journal Chem. (2020-08-06)
Locking down shape-shifting spike protein aids development of COVID-19 vaccine
Publishing in the journal Nature, researchers from the Univ. of Texas at Austin, Moderna and the NIH explain how they developed the COVID-19 vaccine candidate mRNA-1273 and report strong positive results on its effectiveness in mice. (2020-08-05)
Better at binding SARS-CoV-2: A variant of the human receptor for the virus as a powerful decoy
By exploring variants of a soluble version of the receptor that SARS-CoV-2 uses to binds human cells - which are being considered as therapeutic candidates that neutralize COVID-19 infection by acting as a decoy - researchers identified one that binds the virus's spike protein tightly enough to compete with spike binding by monoclonal antibodies. (2020-08-04)
Identification of a new mechanism in the immune system provides knowledge about diseases
A recently identified mechanism in the immune system reveals a previously unknown protein that could provide an opening to a better understanding of infections and autoimmune diseases. (2020-08-04)
How a gooey slime helps bacteria survive
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that the bacterium C. perfringens modulates the structure of its biofilm at different temperatures by regulating the expression of the novel extracellular protein BsaA. (2020-08-03)
Rapid test for the determination of antibodies against Sars-Cov-2
To determine immunity to Sars-Cov-2 and the effectiveness of potential vaccines, the amount of neutralising antibodies in the blood of recovered or vaccinated individuals must be determined. (2020-07-30)
Researchers describe structure of SARS-CoV-2 proteins suitable for design of new drugs
Group of researchers at IOCB Prague determined and analyzed the precise structure of the Nsp16 and Nsp10 protein complex of the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. (2020-07-30)
Bringing RNA into genomics
By studying RNA-binding proteins, a research consortium known as ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) has identified genomic sites that appear to code for RNA molecules that influence gene expression. (2020-07-29)
Researchers discover 'Marie Kondo' protein which aids in organizing fruit fly embryos
Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have discovered a protein in fruit fly embryos, dubbed Marie Kondo, that destroys maternal proteins. (2020-07-28)
Studying COVID-19's envelope protein
A likeness between genes of the SARS and COVID-19 viruses could inform research into potential treatments. (2020-07-27)
Temporary salt crystals may provide a permanent solution to Alzheimer's
Researchers at Osaka University have demonstrated that precipitation of a salt crystal occurs even at concentrations much lower than its solubility due to local density fluctuation and this repeated precipitation-dissolution of salt crystals significantly accelerates the production of neurotoxic aggregates of amyloid-β peptides. (2020-07-27)
Not just light: The sensitivity of photoreceptors to mechanical stimuli is unveiled
''We thought we knew almost everything about photoreceptors, but we have proved that is not the case''. (2020-07-27)
Study shows three medications currently on the market may have unexpected effects
A new study of 1,443 medications found that three prescription drugs currently on the market caused unexpected changes in worms that could point to potential, unrecognized effects in humans. (2020-07-27)
SARS-CoV-2 infection of non-neuronal cells, not neurons, may drive loss of smell in patients with COVID-19
A new study of human olfactory cells has revealed that viral invasion of supportive cells in the nasal cavity might be driving the loss of smell seen in some patients with COVID-19. (2020-07-24)
Engineered SARS-CoV-2 protein offers better stability and yields for vaccine researchers
A team of scientists has engineered the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus - a critical component of potential COVID-19 vaccines - to be more environmentally stable and generate larger yields in the lab. (2020-07-23)
Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, linked to lower risk of death
Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, are associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, finds an analysis of the latest evidence published by The BMJ today. (2020-07-22)
Influenza virus-induced oxidized DNA activates inflammasomes
In this study, a research group at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) observed nucleus- and mitochondria-derived double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in extracellular web-like structures in the cytoplasm and extracellular space around influenza virus-infected macrophages. (2020-07-21)
Researchers develop new tools to rapidly test activity of anti-coronavirus antibodies
Researchers at The Rockefeller University in New York have developed new tools to rapidly test the ability of antibodies to neutralize SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-07-21)
Scientists present pre- and postfusion cryo-em structures of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein
Scientists report two new cryo-EM structures representing the pre- and postfusion conformations of the full-length SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein, an essential viral component responsible for host cell entry and the spread of infection. (2020-07-21)
Formation of quadruple helix DNA tracked in live human cells for the first time
The formation of four-stranded DNA has been tracked in living human cells, allowing scientists to see how it works, and its possible role in cancer. (2020-07-20)
Cheese making relies on milk proteins to form structure
Cheese production relies on coagulation of milk proteins into a gel matrix after addition of rennet. (2020-07-20)
COVID-19: Viral shutdown of protein synthesis
Researchers from Munich and Ulm have determined how the pandemic coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 inhibits the synthesis of proteins in infected cells and shown that it effectively disarms the body's innate immune system (2020-07-17)
Close-up of SARS-CoV-2 protein shows how it interferes with host anti-viral immunity
A detailed study of a SARS-Cov-2 protein, Nsp1, with a central role in weakening the host anti-viral immune response shows that it effectively shuts down production ofproteins in the host. (2020-07-17)
Un-natural mRNAs modified with sulfur atoms boost efficient protein synthesis
A group of Japanese scientists has succeeded in the development of modified messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that contain sulfur atoms in the place of oxygen atoms of phosphate moieties of natural mRNAs. (2020-07-16)
Self-eating decisions
Harvard Medical School researchers systematically surveyed the entire protein landscape of normal and nutrient-deprived cells to identify which proteins and organelles are degraded by autophagy. (2020-07-16)
Pioneering method reveals dynamic structure in HIV
The method reveals that the lattice, which forms the major structural component of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is dynamic. (2020-07-16)
Slow growth the key to long term cold sensing
In this study which appears in Nature, researchers Yusheng Zhao and Rea Antoniou-Kourounioti in the groups of Professor Dame Caroline Dean and Professor Martin Howard at John Innes Centre show that slow growth is used as a signal to sense long-term changes in temperature. (2020-07-15)
Messages sent by osteoblasts to osteoclasts are enclosed in an extracellular vesicle
Both osteoblasts and osteoclasts are necessary for fracture repair. While osteoblasts are known to control the formation and activity of osteoclasts, the inter-cellular signaling involved in this process is not fully understood. (2020-07-14)
How to map brain connections using DNA barcodes
Detailed wiring diagrams--connectomes--for the brain are critical for understanding brain development, function, and disease. (2020-07-14)
Green is more than skin-deep for hundreds of frog species
The through-and-through greenness of hundreds of frog species that can be found deep in their lymphatic fluid, soft tissues and even bones, comes from a clever biochemical workaround that combines a normally virus-fighting type of protein with a toxic byproduct of blood breakdown. (2020-07-13)
An early morning whey protein snack increases morning blood sugar level in healthy people
Consuming protein at night increases blood sugar level in the morning for healthy people, according to new research presented this week at The Physiological Society's virtual early career conference called Future Physiology 2020. (2020-07-10)
X-ray scattering shines light on protein folding
KAIST researchers have used an X-ray method to track how proteins fold, which could improve computer simulations of this process, with implications for understanding diseases and improving drug discovery. (2020-07-09)
OPTN-ATG9 interaction accelerates autophagic degradation of ubiquitin-labeled mitochondria
Damaged mitochondria are selectively eliminated via autophagy (called mitophagy). Parkin and PINK1, proteins mutated in hereditary Parkinson's disease, amplify ubiquitin signals on damaged mitochondria with the subsequent activation of autophagic machinery. (2020-07-09)
Glowing worms provide live-action movies of the body's internal scaffolding
Duke researchers have made the first time-lapse movies of the sheet-like mesh that surrounds and supports most animal tissues. (2020-07-08)
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