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Current Food production News and Events

Current Food production News and Events, Food production News Articles.
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Study: Crowdsourced data could help map urban food deserts
New research from The University of Texas at Dallas suggests food deserts might be more prevalent in the U.S. than the numbers reported in government estimates. (2020-07-02)
GPS isn't just for road trips anymore
Precision agriculture technologies can improve efficiency on smaller farms (2020-07-01)
Feeds of the future
Worldwide there is growing demand for animal products for human nutrition, despite the popularity of plant-based diets. (2020-07-01)
Food taxes and subsidies would bring major health gains, study shows
A consumer tax on the saturated fat, salt and sugar content of food, accompanied by a 20 per cent subsidy on fruit and vegetables, would bring major benefits for the health sector, researchers from Otago, Auckland and Melbourne Universities say. (2020-06-30)
Researchers print, tune graphene sensors to monitor food freshness, safety
Researchers are using high-resolution printing technology and the unique properties of graphene to make low-cost biosensors to monitor food safety and livestock health. (2020-06-29)
SNAP work requirements put low-income Americans at risk
When work requirements for a federal food safety-net program start again, many low-income Americans will lose benefits -- and Black adults will be hardest hit, according to a study published today. (2020-06-26)
Food-grade wheatgrass variety released for public use
Farmers can now grow this superfood with environmental and health benefits. (2020-06-24)
Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan in input-output analysis
Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan was examined in IOA. (2020-06-24)
COVID-19: Bacteriophage could decrease mortality
Bacteriophage can reduce bacterial growth in the lungs, limiting fluid build-up. (2020-06-24)
Not so robust: robusta coffee more sensitive to warming than previously thought
A new study of the plant that produces robusta coffee suggests its heat tolerance has been consistently overestimated. (2020-06-21)
One in four UK adults at risk of hunger and potential malnutrition following lockdown
One in four adults in the UK are experiencing food insecurity, which is likely to have left them susceptible to hunger and potential malnutrition, during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-06-20)
Researchers pioneer new production method for heterostructure devices
Researchers at the University of Exeter have developed a pioneering production method for heterostructure devices, based on 2D materials such as graphene. (2020-06-19)
Coronavirus: A wake-up call to strengthen the global food system
A new commentary in the journal One Earth highlights not only climate-related risks to the global food system, such as drought and floods, but also exposes the coronavirus pandemic as a shock to the system that has led to food crises in many parts of the world. (2020-06-19)
Scientists unlock secrets of Ethiopia's superfood in race to save it from warming climate
Teff, an ancient grain originally from Ethiopia, is a staple crop for 50 million people in the country. (2020-06-18)
International study indicates shift to raw/home-made food diet for pets over past decade
While most cats and dogs are still being fed 'conventional' wet and dry food, there has been a distinct shift in feeding practices over the past decade to include raw and home-made foods, particularly in Australia, finds an international study, published in this week's issue of Vet Record. (2020-06-18)
Crop residue decisions affect soil life
New findings share how prescribed fire and no-till management impact soil microbes. (2020-06-17)
What it means when animals have beliefs
Humans are not the only ones who have beliefs; animals do too, although it is more difficult to prove them than with humans. (2020-06-17)
Seafood helped prehistoric people migrate out of Africa, study reveals
A study, led by the University of York, has examined fossil reefs near to the now-submerged Red Sea shorelines that marked prehistoric migratory routes from Africa to Arabia. (2020-06-16)
Agroforestry is 'win win' for bees and crops, study shows
Agroforestry has long been suggested as a solution to halt the decline of pollinators, yet observational studies in temperate climates have been virtually non-existent. (2020-06-16)
As food insecurity continues to plague New Yorkers, impact on children is worrisome
One in four households with children have reported a child experiencing hunger as a result of the COVID-19 health crisis, according to the latest CUNY SPH COVID-19 tracking survey. (2020-06-15)
COVID-19 will affect the food and financial security of many for years to come
The complex food shopping patterns that financially insecure families employ have been upended by COVID-19. (2020-06-15)
Bird feeding helps females more than males
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that female birds benefit more from extra food in the winter. (2020-06-12)
Mixture and migration brought food production to sub-Saharan Africa
A new interdisciplinary study published in the journal Science Advances reports on 20 newly sequenced ancient genomes from sub-Saharan Africa, including the first genomes from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Botswana, and Uganda. (2020-06-12)
An essential sustainable farming practice faces one big limitation: Land to produce seeds
The growth in cover cropping in the United States may soon hit a ceiling: planting millions of acres of cover crops requires huge extensions of land to produce cover crop seed. (2020-06-11)
Refugee children get better health, nutrition via e-vouchers
Electronic food vouchers provided young Rohingya children in Bangladeshi refugee camps with better health and nutrition than direct food assistance, according to new research led by Cornell University, in conjunction with the International Food Policy Research Institute. (2020-06-11)
Fuel walking and cycling with low carbon diets, researchers say
Walking and cycling have many benefits and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but researchers say we need to think about what people eat to fuel their walking and cycling. (2020-06-11)
Glycolysis involved in immunosuppression by polyphenol; PCB2DG
Researchers at Shinshu University in Japan found that glycolysis is involved in immunosuppression by polyphenols. (2020-06-10)
Feeding habits differ by age and sex in Asian black bears: Data may help wildlife experts better manage bears' habitats
A ten-year study shows that Asian black bears' diets vary greatly depending on sex, stage of life, and resource availability, providing important information on foraging strategy according to age-sex classes. (2020-06-09)
Holders of negative opinions towards GM food likely to be against other novel food tech
Scientists at NTU Singapore and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health have found that people who hold negative opinions of genetically-modified (GM) food are likely to feel the same about nano-enabled food -- food with nano-additives to enhance flavor, nutrition or prolong shelf life. (2020-06-09)
Novel DNA analysis will help to identify food origin and counterfeit food in the future
Estonian scientists are developing a DNA-based method of analysis that enables them to identify food components and specify the origin of a foodstuff. (2020-06-09)
Threats to global food security from emerging fungal crop pathogens
Amongst the world's most challenging problems is the need to feed an ever-growing global population sustainably. (2020-06-08)
Research team to study food resilience in the face of catastrophic global events
An interdisciplinary team of Penn State professors has received $3 million from Open Philanthropy to study food resilience in the face of catastrophic global events such as an all-out nuclear war, a large asteroid strike or a supervolcano eruption. (2020-06-08)
Pinker flamingos more aggressive
Bright pink flamingos are more aggressive than paler rivals when fighting over food, new research shows. (2020-06-07)
Researchers develop sustainable method for extracting vanillin from wood processing waste
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have developed a new sustainable method of extracting the flavoring agent vanillin from lignin, a component of wood. (2020-06-03)
Disorder in fish shoals may reap rewards at dinner time
The advantages of animals foraging in an orderly group are well-known, but research by the University of Bristol has found an element of unruly adventure can help fish in the quest for food. (2020-06-01)
Russian scientists to improve the battery for sensors
Researchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) approached the creation of a solid-state thin-film battery for miniature devices and sensors. (2020-06-01)
Two bacteria allow spittlebugs to thrive on low-nutrient meals
A new study examines the symbiotic relationship between two types of bacteria and spittlebugs that helps the insect live on very low-nutrient food. (2020-05-28)
Birds, bees and butter -- new study shows biodiversity critical for shea crop in Africa
A new study shows that shea yields are higher in more diverse habitats in sub-Saharan Africa, which has important implications for a crop that is typically harvested and sold by women in rural areas, and which helps finance education for children. (2020-05-26)
Development of heat-tolerant annual ryegrass germplasm
Researchers develop new annual ryegrass for earlier fall planting in the southeastern US. (2020-05-21)
When plant pollen scarce, bumblebees biting leaves causes flowers to bloom early
Facing a scarcity of pollen, bumblebees will nibble on the leaves of flowerless plants, causing intentional damage in such a way that accelerates the production of flowers, according to a new study, which reports on a previously unknown behavior of bumblebees. (2020-05-21)
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